The Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University
 

Tell it like it is: Sharing your child’s story

August 1, 2012 by cpehrson

No one knows a child better than a parent.  A parent knows his favorite toys, what he likes to eat, his favorite color, what makes him laugh.  A parent knows and loves him for the unique person that he is and the role that he has within their family.

Parents are asked to tell their child’s medical history over and over again, to different providers.  A parent knows many things that a doctor will never know about a child; things that would help him understand and work better with his patient.

It would be helpful if a parent could share that information with the doctor in a concise,  efficient way, similar to a resume.  This could be a great tool to hand to a doctor that could also include the child’s medical history and current treatment status.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has developed just such a tool, simply called My Child’s Story. It’s short, it’s informative, and it’s helpful.

CDC recommends that when you are ready to create your own child’s story, remember to include this information:

  • name and birth date;
  • social history, including other family members and pets and where your child goes to school;
  • birth record;
  • medical history including any hospitalizations, contact information for all doctors, medications currently taking, allergies and reaction to any materials; and
  • information about who your child is, including his or her hobbies and favorite things.

You can view a fictional example of one child’s story online.

When you have your child’s story done, make copies and share them with everyone who has a hand in the medical care of your child.

 

 

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