It is our vision that individuals
and their family members excercise
independence and self-determination
across their lifespans as communities
support full participation
and informed choices

Center for Persons with Disabilities

2004 Annual Report

Accomplishments
Directors
Advisory Board
Council on Consumer Affairs
Organization
Awards, Leadership & Collaboration
Fiscal Information
Proposals Submitted
Proposals Funded
Consumer Services
Student Support
Courses & Practica
Publications & Products
Training, TA & Consultation
National & International Presentations
Project Directory
Project Descriptions










Accomplishments 2004

"Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there. "

-Will Rogers

froo froo THE MISSION of the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) makes this commitment: "Faculty and staff of the Center will engage with consumers with disabilities and their family members, consumer organizations, and local and state agencies to address the quality of life throughout the lifespan." That mission continues to seem like the "right track" for the CPD. The engagement of our faculty and staff is unparalleled. Thus, this report describes ongoing projects, familiar to readers, that we believe continue to promote quality of life. Along with those projects, this report describes new ones. Clearly, the Center has not stood still in the past year. Among the highlights reported are:

Doctor Sarah Rule, C.P.D. Director Dr. Sarah Rule
CPD Director
I welcome your thoughts about the CPD's "track ", how fast we are going, and where. We are always ready to change to benefit the lives of people with disabilities and their families.


signature

"I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones. "

-John Cage


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Directors

C.P.D. Division Director photos

Cyndi Rowland, PhD; CPD Associate Director
Judith Holt, PhD; Interdisciplinary Training
Richard N. Roberts, PhD; Research & Development
J. Dennis Odell, MD; Biomedical
John Copenhaver, ME; Technical Assistance
Anthony R. Torres, MD; Biomedical
Richard Baer, PhD; Outreach & Dissemination
Alan Hofmeister, PhD; Technology
Susan Nittrouer, PhD; Exemplary Services
Nancy Yonk; Business Office Manager

Directors Top

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Advisory Board

UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVES

Gerry Giordano, CHAIR
Dean, College of Education and Human Services
Utah State University

Brent Miller, Vice President
Office of Research
Utah State University

David Stein, Department Head
Department of Psychology, College of Education and Human Services
Utah State University

Ben Lingnugaris/Kraft,Department Head
Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, College of Education
Utah State University

James Blair,Department Head
Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education
Utah State University

AGENCY / COMMUNITY REPRESENTATIVES

Fraser Nelson, Executive Director
Disability Law Center

Alison Lozano, Executive Director
Governor's Council for People with Disabilities

Ernest Rendon, Executive Director
Logan Regional Hospital Foundation

Kirk Allen, Director Special Education
Logan City School District

EX OFFICIO

Sarah Rule,Director
Center for Persons with Disabilities

Cyndi Rowland,Associate Director
Center for Persons with Disabilities

Gordon Richins,Consumer Liason
Center for Persons with Disabilities

Carol Strong,Associate Dean
College of Education and Human Services

 

CONSUMER REPRESENTATIVES

Matt Maw
Laurie Ballam
Marsha Rawlins
Vickie Brenchley
Blake Savage
Bill Salerno
Don Uchida
Helen Post

Advisory Board Top

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Council on Consumer Affairs

 

PARENT/FAMILY REPRESENTATIVES

Sandra Anderson
Jamie Verburg
Gilbert Duncan
Marsha Rawlins

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE

Matt Maw

PRIMARY CONSUMER REPRESENTATIVES

Ron Mecham

Jane Nielsen

Helen Roth

Bill Salerno,
Vice Chair

Blake Savage, Chair

 

EX OFFICIO

Gordon Richins, Consumer Liason
Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University

Cyndi Rowland, Associate Director
Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University

Sarah Rule, Director
Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University

DIVISION REPRESENTATIVES

Catherine Benitz
Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center

Marvin Fifield
Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University

Rod Price
Utah Assistive Technology Project

Sachin Dev Pavithran
Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University

COCA Top

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Organization

Graphic Version

organization chart

Flash version

TEXT VERSION:

  1. Utah State University
  2. College of Education; Dean Gerry Giordano
  3. Center for Persons with Disabilities; Sarah Rule, Director

Organization Top

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Awards, Leadership & Collaboration



Center for Persons with Disabilities Alan Hofmeister Anthony R. Torres Dennis Odell Gerry Olvey Georgiana Clausen Gordon Richins Jeanie Peck Jeff Sheen John Copenhaver Judith Holt Karen Hansen
Carol Winn
Sherry Joy
Karen Hansen Kathryn Bezzant
Keith Christensen Lisa Boyce Mark S. Innocenti Marilyn Hammond Martin Blair Marvin Fifield Mónica Jimenez Richard Roberts Rod Price Sarah Rule Sherry Joy Susan Nittrouer Sue Olsen
Vonda Jump

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Awards Top










Fiscal Information

Total CPD Funding $15,689,807

Sources of Funding

OVER 80 percent of CPD funding comes from external sources. For every dollar received from Utah State University more than five additional dollars are generated through CPD grants and contracts with state, federal, and private agencies.
pie chart
  • FIPSE-2%
  • IHS-4%
  • HHS-4%
  • Fees-5%
  • NIDRR-9%
  • University-15%
  • MCH-8%
  • NIH-3%
  • OSEP-1%
  • NICHD-3%
  • OSERS-11%
  • BIA-4%
  • States Services / Training 31%


Distribution of Funding

MANY CPD projects address multiple areas of emphasis. For instance, although the main thrust of a project may be research, dissemination activities may also be an ongoing activity within the project. The end result is that most projects perform more than one function.
pie chart
  • FIPSE-2%
  • Instructional Development 10%
  • Training 26%
  • Technical Assistance 19%
  • Dissemination 5%
  • Research 10%
  • Services 28%

Fiscal Top

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Proposals Submitted $16,788,069

line-chart

TITLE AMOUNT SOURCE PI
ABC's of Transitioning from Nursing Homes- subcontract $29,450 Baylor University Judith Holt
Adaptive Computer Laboratory: Hardware Upgrade $24,994 R. Harold Burton Foundation
The Arc of Utah
Martin Blair
Adaptive Computer Laboratory: Training Hardware $10,000 M. Bastian Foundation Martin Blair
Adventures in Public Health-Version II $15,000 Utah Dept. of Health Judith Holt
Jeff Sheen
Arizona Center for Professions in Education $183,339 State of Arizona John Copenhaver
Assist Utah Women w/Disabilities Who are Victims of Violence $349,983 U.S. Dept. of Justice Richard Baer
Marilyn Hammond
Wyoming in Revising Part C and Part B619 Monitoring $123,545 State of Wyoming John Copenhaver
Assisitive Technology Adaptive Computer Laboratory $13,350 Ashton Family Foundation Martin Blair
Assistive Technology Adaptive Computer Training Center $23,907 Dumke Foundation Martin Blair
AUCD Core Administration- continuation $428,463 Health & Human Services/ Administration on Developmental Disabilities Sarah Rule
Bear River Activity and Skill Center $250,000 Division of Services for People with Disabilities Richard Baer
Beyond Access: Inclusive Outdoor Play Spaces for Children with Disabilities $133,903 Health & Human Services/ Administration on Developmental Disabilities Judith Holt
Keith Christensen
BIA Schoolwide Monitoring Part B Application $473,880 Bureau of Indian Affairs John Copenhaver
BIA Consolidated School Reform Part B Application $105,312 Bureau of Indian Affairs John Copenhaver
Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support - year 4 $359,493 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Mark Innocenti
Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support Supplements $118,506 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Mark Innocenti
Bottom-Up Modeling of Mass Pedestrian Flows: Implications for the Egress of Individuals with Disabilities $500,000 National Science Foundation Keith Christensen
Bottom-Up Modeling of Mass Pedestrian Flows: Implications for the Effective Egress of Individuals with Disabilities $450,000 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Keith Christensen
Boys and Girls Club Helping Children with Disabilities-year 2 $138,072 Health & Human Services/ Administration on Developmental Disabilities Richard Baer
Building Capacity to Improve Services to Students w/Disabilities $920,160 State of New Mexico John Copenhaver
Center to Improve Access to General Ed Curriculum for Students with Disabilities $37,675 American Institute for Research John Copenhaver
CHAMP Supplement $300,000 Health & Human Services
Maternal & Child Health Bureau
Richard Roberts
Champions for Progress - continuation $1,100,000 Health & Human Services / Maternal & Child Health Bureau Richard Roberts
Child Nutrition Program $137,419 Utah State Office of Education Jeanie Peck
Collaborative Early Childhood Education Program $193,479 Utah State Office of Education Marlene Deer
Construction of an Autism HLA-Haptotype $201,550 Sorenson Foundation Anthony R. Torres
Cost and Outcomes of Early versus Delayed Hearing Detection and Intervention for Infants Diagnosed with Hearing Loss $149,994 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Linda Goetze
Effects of Inclusion on Outcomes for Youth in Transition $149,999 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Linda Goetze
Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Cost Analysis $71,447 Utah Dept. of Health Linda Goetze
Karl White
Election Worker Training Curriculum $10,000 Utah State Office of Elections Martin Blair
Kathryn Bezzant
Emergency Preparedness in Rural Areas $45,000 USU Extension/Dept. of Justice Judith Holt
Evaluating Choose to Work $99,909 Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Marilyn Hammond
Richard Baer
Evaluating Piute Children's Project $6,742 Cedar Band of Piutes Glenna Boyce
Evaluating Utah One-Stop Enhancement Project $53,100 Utah Department of Workforce Services Richard Baer
Getting it Together: Community Based Implementation Plan for One-Stop Family Support Center in Salt Lake City $100,000 Health & Human Services/Administration on Developmental Disabilities Judith Holt
Martin Blair
IBM Accessibility Course $58,564 Computer Task Groups, Inc. Cyndi Rowland
Independent Living Modules $50,274 Baylor University Jeff Sheen
Judith Holt
Indian Children & rsquo;s Program $691,281 Indian Health Services Marvin Fifield
ILRU Development $4,000 Baylor University Judith Holt
LENDlinks $28,001 Riley Child Development Center Judith Holt
Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center $1,300,000 Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services John Copenhaver
National Institute for Keeping Web Accessibility in Mind K-12 Education $246,736 U.S. Dept. of Education Cyndi Rowland
Northern Utah Area Health Education Center $70,000 Weber State University Judith Holt
Jeanie Peck
Online Training-subcontract $21,262 Baylor University Judith Holt
Jeff Sheen
Online Course Instruction $44,010 Baylor University Jeff Sheen
Judith Holt
Opening Utah & rsquo;s Doors-continuation $150,000 Health & Human Services / Maternal & Child Health Bureau Richard Roberts
Online Training Subcontract-augmentation $21,262 Baylor University Jeff Sheen
Judith Holt
Online Course Instruction Education Subcontract- augmentation $44,010 Baylor University Jeff Sheen
Judith Holt
Outcomes Project-year 3 $179,998 U.S. Dept. of Education Richard Roberts
RESEED Center for Persons with Disabilities
Self-Employment Project
$13,378 Rehabilitation Services Agency Gordon Richins
Rocky Mountain Public Health Consortium: MCH Certification $6,750 University of Arizona Adrienne Akers
Strategic Planning and Needs Assessment $12,619 Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Richard Baer
The Ontogeny of Segmental Speech Organization $210,000 National Institute on Deafness & Other Communicative Disorders Susan Nittrouer
Technical Assistance Center for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support $50,000 University of Oregon John Copenhaver
Training for Law Enforcement Officers, Prosecutors and Court Officers in Abuse Against Individuals w/Disabilities and/or the Elderly $298,000 U.S. Department of Justice Marilyn Hammond
Richard Baer
ULEND Training Grant subcontract- year 3 $121,000 University of Utah Judith Holt
Universal Access to Indoor Environments through Distributed Tracking & Guidance $900,000 National Science Foundation V.A. Kulyukin
Martin Blair
Up-to-3 Early Intervention Project $757,120 Utah Department of Health Susan Olsen
Utah Alternative Financing Program $388,928 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Martin Blair
Marilyn Hammond
Utah Assistive Technology Program $370,276 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Martin Blair
Marilyn Hammond
Utah Early Intervention Project $150,000 Utah State Office of Education Linda Goetze
Utah Kids Link Project $52,557 Utah State Department of Health Richard Roberts
Utah Multi University Consortium: Statewide Preparation of Early Childhood Specialists and K-12 Teachers in Vision and Hearing Impairments $1,249,995 University of Utah
Utah State University
Jan Day
Judith Holt
Andrea McDonald
Utah One-Stop Enhancement Project $97,452 Utah Department of Workforce Services Judith Holt
Utah Preschool Cost Quality and Outcomes- continuation $150,000 Utah State Office of Education Linda Goetze
Mark Innocenti
Utah Rural Frontiers Project-continuation $290,540 Utah Dept. of Human Services Glenna Boyce
Utah Statewide Implementation Traumatic Brain Injury Grant $356,000 Division of Services to People with Disabilities Judith Holt
Utah Telework Fund Program $862,074 National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research Martin Blair
Marilyn Hammond
Utah Work Incentives Training and Information- Year 3 $224,321 Utah Department of Health Judith Holt
Workability Videos $10,000 Utah Department of Health Judith Holt

Proposals Top

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Proposals Funded $15,274,519

line-chart

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Consumer Services


photo THE CPD provides direct services and supports aimed at improving the lives of consumers with disabilities, their families, and communities. Services included diagnosis, evaluation, intervention, and service coordination for children and adults with disabilities. These services help in minimizing disparities in health care, enhancing educational opportunities, developing working skills, and enriching daily living. Assistance is also provided by linking consumers and their families with other community resources.

The CPD also helps to improve the lives of people with disabilities through assistive technology. Projects at the Center help those who need it to obtain the equipment necessary to read, hear, speak, write, learn, work, play, and fully participate in community life.

CPD model and demonstration services include implementation of individualized service plans, family support services, neurotherapy, feeding and nutrition , and inclusionary and transition services.

Direct Services # of participants
ADHD/Medical Clinic 435
Assessment/Evaluation 209
Feeding & Nutrition Clinic 19
Neurology Clinic 57

Community-Based Services # of participants
Bear River Activity Skill Center 68
ASSERT 5
Child Care Nutrition Program 166
Medical Home Project 100
Utah Assistive Technology Program 210
Utah Assistive Technology Foundation 400
Up-to-3 508
Assistive Technology Lab 468
TOTAL CONSUMERS 2,645

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Student Support


photo
CRITICAL to the quality of life for individuals with disabilities is the availability of well-trained professionals. The CPD delivers high quality training in a collaborative, coordinated and interdisciplinary fashion to address issues affecting people throughout their lifespan across health, education, employment, and social service systems. Numerous activities offered through the Center are aimed at preparing professionals and paraprofessionals to work in the field of developmental disabilities. The Interdisciplinary Training Division provides opportunities for students to increase their awareness, knowledge and skills by working as part of an interdisciplinary team. Other projects offer both inservice and preservice training, with a growing emphasis on continuing and distance education, as well as minority populations. Trainees include university students from multiple disciplines with an emphasis on leadership; practicing professionals; direct care providers; and individuals and families.

Teaching
CPD Interdisciplinary Training Stipends 14
Interdisciplinary Training in Assistive Technology 85
Project Stipends / Undergraduate Certification 9
ULEND Long-Term Interdisciplinary Trainees 19
Distance Student Advisement 62
Practicum / Clinical Experience 42
Supervised Training Experience 18
Internships 5
Postdoctoral Fellowship 1
University Courses Taught by CPD Staff
      Number of Courses 23
      Number of Departments 8
      University Credit Hours Generated 1,584
      Number of Students 643

Graduate Student Advisement
Doctoral Committees Served 8
Masters Committes Chaired 1
Masters Committees Served 8

Student Support
Graduate Assistantships 25
Student Employees 147

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Courses & Practica


 
UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY
Family, Consumer, & Human Development
Instructor # of Students Total Credits
Survey of human development research Jump 14 42
Abuse and neglect Jump 37 111
Parenting and child guidance Boyce 50 150
Infancy and early childhood Boyce 25 75
Instructional Technology      
Developing instruction using Macromedia Flash Smith 17 45
Digital video editing* Blair 21 63
Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning      
Environmental dimension of site analysis Christensen 45 135
Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication      
Spanish* Jimenez 88 264
Psychology      
Developmental psychology Jump 88 264
Developmental psychology: Lifespan Wooton 18 54
Special Education      
Higher educatin learning skills for students with visual disabilities Jones
Price
6 18
Interdisciplinary training* Holt
Fiechtl
38 93
Utah law institute Benitz 112 112
Teaching infants and young children with disabilities Deer
Fiechtl
22 66
Assistive and adaptive technology for young children with disabilities Deer 9 18
Preschool practicum / Assessment Deer 11 11
ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONSORTIUM      
Systems of care for children with special health care needs Roberts 3 27
Leadership seminar Roberts
Behl
10 30
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH      
Children with special health needs Roberts 10 24
BOX ELDER ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL      
Exploration in disabilities Baer 19 10

 
*indicates courses taught more than one semester

Courses & Practica Top

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Publications & Products

Books/Chapters

Baer, R.D. (2003). Aging and disability. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.). Disability-related careers: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M. (2003). Introductions and expectations. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.). Disability-related careers: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M. (2003). Learning disabilities. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.). Disability-related careers: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M. (2003). Hearing impairments. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.). Disability-related careers: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Jump, V. K. (2004). Massage therapy effects on illness symptoms in infants living in Ecuadorian Orphanages. In T. Field (Ed) Touch and Massage in Early Child Development. Johnson & Johnson Pediatric Institute, LLC ,227-237.


Refereed Articles

Bohman, P. (2003). Fast track to web accessibility. Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2003 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.

Buysse, V., & Boyce, L. (Co-Editors) (2003). Evaluating programs that serve infants and families: The quest for quality. Zero to Three Special Issue.

Hammond, M. (2003). The Utah Assistive Technology Foundation Program: Features and initiatives. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 14 (2),95-97.

Hofmeister, A. (2004). Education reform in mathematics: A history ignoredfi Journal of Direct Instruction, 4(1), 5-11.

McGowan, R.S., Nittrouer, S., & Manning, C. (2004). Development of [ ] in young, midwestern, American Children. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 112 , 711-719.

Nittrouer, S. (2004). The role of temportal and dynamic signal components in the perception of syllable-stop voicing by children and adults. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 115, 1777-1790.

Opitz, C., Savenye, W., & Rowland, C. (2003). Accessibility of state department of education home pages and special education pages. TAM; CEC, 18(1), 17-28.

Roggman, L. A., & Boyce, L. K., Cook, G. A., Christiansen, K., & Jones, D. (2004). Playing with Daddy: Social toy play, early Head Start, and developmental outcomes. Fathering, 2, 83-108.

Roberts, R.N., Behl, D. & Akers, A. (2004). Building a system of care for children with special health care needs. Infants and Young Children,17(3), 213-222.

Rowland, C. (2004). The National Center on Disability and Access to Education. Proceedings of Ed-Media 2004, World conference on educational multimedia, hypermedia and telecommunications. (Cantoni and McLoughlin Eds.) Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 5218-5219.

Smith, J. (2004). Captioning web multimedia-an overview of processes, technologies, resource and tools. Proceedings of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference.

Torres AR. (2003). Is fever suppression involved in the etiology of autism and neurodevelopmental disordersfi BMC Pedi-atrics,3(9).


Nonrefereed Articles

Ball, W. (2003). What works for schools. Defining what it means to improve access to the general education curriculum. The Utah Special Educator, 24(3), 3.

Benitz, C. (2003). Four roles of leadership for the IEP team. The Utah Special Educator, 25(2).

Benitz, C. (2004). Courage to teach. The Utah Special Educator, 24(4).

Blair, M.E. (2004). Tech scapes: Assistive technology act, statewide grant program, bene fits for families. Exceptional Parent, 34, 34-35.

Boyce, Glenna (2003). InReach Project: Supporting the parent-infant relationship in the NICU. Utah Association for Infant Mental Health Newsletter, 2.

Dughman, R. (2004). IDEA '97: A reason to celebrate. The Utah Special Educator, 24(6), 8-9.

Gallegos, E. (2004). What works for students in assessmentfi The Utah Special Educator, 24(5).

Hofmeister, A. (2004). What works for students at risk of academic failurefi The Utah Special Educator, 24(5), 12-13.

Hofmeister, A. (2003). Special education and Reading First. The Utah Special Educator, 24(1), 14-16.

Holt, J.M., Sheen, J., & Chambless, C. (2003). Work incentives and the transition to work in rural areas. Conference Proceedings, Salt Lake City, UT: American Council on Rural Special Education National Conference.

Jimenez, J. (2004). Information for the Latin community of Cache Valley: Services provided by UATP, UATF, and Telework. Latinos & iexcl;Hoy!,4, 6.

Jimenez, J. (2004). Making a difference in our community. Latinos & iexcl;Hoy!,2, 8-9.

Mariger, H., & Rule, S. (2004). NCDAE: Accessibility in higher education and practice. ACRES Conference Proceedings, 186-194.

Olsen, S. (2004). Celebrate: Utah Up-To-3 Wins 2004 National Exemplary Program Award. The Utah Special Educator, 24(6).

Rule, S. (2004). Advisory board members. RCE Newsletter, 5 (2),3.

Winn. C. (2004). Home visits and teenage parents. AAHBEI News Exchange, 9(2),2.


Other

Anderson, S., Pavithran, S., & Bohman, P. (2004). Accessible taxesfi A blind man's experience with the United States' tax system. Online publication available at: www.webaim.org/techniques/articles/taxes.

Baer, R.D. (2004). Choose to work Utah: Evaluation of a state partnership grant. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Baer, R.D., & Althouse, B. (2003). Estimator-NJ: Version 2.0 [guide/software]. Logan, UT:DB Enterprises.

Baer, R.D., & Loving, S. (2004). Continuing follow-up of Utah students exiting special education in 1996-97 [monograph/re-port]. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Baer, R.D. (2004). VR strategic planning revsited. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Blair, P. (2004). A review of free, online accessibility tools. Online publication available at: www.webaim. org/techniques/articles/freetools/.

Blair, P. (2004). Keeping web accessibility in mind: The state of web accessibility in United States K-12 education [CD]. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Blair, P., & Lyman, M. (2004). No Child Left Behind: Is your website accessiblefi [CD]. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Blair, M. E., Goldmann, H., & Relton J. (April 2004). Access to electronically-mediated education for students with disabilities: Policy issues. Online publication available at: www.ncdae.org/papers/policy.htm.

Bohman, P. (2004). University web accessibility policies: A bridge not quite far enough. Online publication available at: www.webaim.org/coordination/articles/policies-pilot

Bohman, P. (2004). Fast track to web accessibility. Online publication.

Bohman, P. (2004). An accessible method of hiding HTML content. Online publication available at: www.webaim.org/ techniques/articles/hiddentext.

Bohman, P. (2003). Visual vs. cognitive disabilities. Online publication available at: www.webaim. org/techniques/articles/vis_vs_cog.

Bohman, P. (2003). Using Opera to check for accessibility. Online publication available at: http:// www.webaim.org/techniques/articles/opera.

Bohman, P. (2003). Do accessible web sites have to be boringfi Online publication available at: www. webaim.org/techniques/articles/boring.

Bohman, P., Anderson, S., Smith, J., Varanasi, B., & Sharma, S. (2003). WAVE v. 3.0:Web Accessibility Versatile Evaluator. Online publication available at: www.wave.webaim.org/index.jsp.

Christensen, K.M. (2004) Inclusive outdoor learning environments: An introductory guide. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Copenhaver, J. (2003). Teacher Assistance Team (TAT)-Primer for school staff and administrators. [guide/handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Copenhaver, J. (2003). Special educational advisory panel [guide]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Copenhaver, J. (2004). Extended school year services [monograph/report]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Collins, B., Menlove, R., & Salzerg, C. (2004). Issues in distance education technology and the preparation of professionals to serve persons with disabilities [online publication/report]. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M., & Blair, M. (2003). Annual Report of the Utah Assistive Technology Program. Submitted to the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Washington, D.C.

Hammond, M. (2003). Final report of the Utah Alternative Financing Program. Submitted to the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Washington, D.C.

Hammond, M. (2004). Marketing alternative finance programs. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M. (2004). Features and bene fits of the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hofmeister, A.M. (2003). The Cibeque Community School Project: Year 1 [annual evaluation report]. Submitted to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, D.C.

Hofmeister, A.M. (2003). Special education NCLB reading staff development [technical report]. Submitted to the Utah State Of fice of Education.

Hofmeister, A.M. (2003). A personnel development model for meeting NCLB and AYP requirements [technical report]. Submitted to the Utah State Of fice of Education.

Holt, J.M., Blair, M., & Sheen, J. (2003). Salaries and work experience of Centers for Independent Living directors: National survey results. ( final report) Houston, TX.: Independent Living Research Utilization.

Holt, J.M., Chambless, C., & George, C. (2004). Olmstead and advocacy: Six training modules[DVD]. Houston, TX: Independent Living Research Utilization/TIRR/Baylor University.

Holt, J.M., Chambless, C., Pusch, B., George, C., & Gleaves, D. (2004). Orientation modules for new independent living staff [DVD]. Houston, TX: Independent Living Research Utilization/TIRR/Baylor University.

Holt, J.M., & Records, T. (2004). ABCs of transitioning from nursing homes. Houston, TX:Independent Living Research Utiliza-tion/TIRR/ Baylor University.

Holt, J.M., & Sheen, J. (2003). E-PAS for mental health consumers: Training modules for employers and employees. Salt Lake City, UT: Valley Mental Health.

Holt, J.M., & Warren, C. (2004). Public Health 101 [DVD]. Salt Lake City, UT:Utah Department of Health.

Holt, J.M. & Warren, C. (2003). Resource DVD for bene fit planners. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health.

Innocenti, M.S., & Price, C. (2003). The relationship between Part C eligibility criteria and receipt of special education services in Kindergarten and first grade. Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP)-A data brief for decision makers. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Innocenti, M.S., & Price, C. (2003). Five years later: The status of children once served in preschool special education programs (Section 619). Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP)-A data brief for decision makers. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Lyman, M. (2004). Web accessibility resource planner (WARP): A modular curriculum for web accessibility teacher development in K-12 education [CD/online publication]. Center for Persons with Disabilities: Logan, UT.

Lyman, M., Rowland, C., & Bohman, P. (2004).

Assessing assessments: The inequity of electronic testing. Online publication available at: http://www.webaim.org/coordination/articles/as-sessment.php.

Menlove, R., Collins, B., & Salzberg, C. (2004). Issues in distance education technology and the preparation of professionals to serve persons with disabilities. Online publication available at: www.ncdae.org/papers/personnedev.htm.

Roberts, R. N., Akers, A., & Behl, D. (2004). Champions for Progress: Making it happen. Early Intervention Research Institute, Utah State University, Logan, UT.

Rowland, C. (2004). The National Institute for Keeping Web Accessibility in Mind in K-12 Education: Project WebAIM: Year 2 [annual evaluation report]. Submitted to the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Washington, D.C.

Rowland, C. (2003). Development of a curriculum template for applied problem-solving in distance dducation learning

communities [final evaluation report]. Submitted to the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, Washington, DC.

Rowland, C., Burgsthaler, S., Smith J., & Coombs, N. (April 2004). Issues in accessing distance education technologies for individuals with disabilities. Online publication available at: www.ncdae.org/papers/technology.htm.

Rule, S., Mariger, H., & Cook, R. (2003). SPIES Outreach: Curiculum and internet support for use of naturalistic intervention strategies with young children [ final report]. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Smith, J. (2004). Captioning on-demand and real-time multimediafi Easy-to-use tools for educators. Online publication.

Smith, J., Lyman, M., Anderson, S., Dance, J., Varanasi, B., Sharma, S., Blair, P., & Rowland, C. (2003). WARP: Web Accessibility Resource Planner. Online publication available at www.webaim.org/warp/.

Smith, J. (2004). Evaluating web site accessibility. Online publication available at: www.webaim.org/techniques/evaluating/.

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Training, T A & Consultation

 

EVERY YEAR, Thousands of individuals from local, state, and national agencies and organizations receive training or technical assistance from project personnel at the CPD. Topics range from evaluation to serving culturally diverse populations to providing accessibility of web-based educational opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Training and technical assistance is provided in many forms, including consultation, workshops, written or audiovisual products, and distance education.

 

Activities by Participants & Durationpie chart

(Individuals may participate in multiple activities, with each activity being counted separately)
Type of Participant Number of Participants
Students* 3,873
Professionals / Paraprofessionals 59,995
Family Memebers / Caregivers 3,625
Adults with Disabilities 3,740
Legislators / Policy Makers** 2,068
General Public 30,691
Other 1,564
Total Participants 105,556
Total Hours 14,183

* Students attending training who are not formally enrolled as CPD trainees or enrolled in USU courses taught by CPD staff.

** This category includes federal, state, local, and agency personnel who address policy impacting persons with disabilities

Activities by Area of Emphasis

Quality of Life 16%
Recreation 7%
Housing 5%
Employment 15%
Quality Assurance 7%
Transportation 5%
Education 25%
Child Care 6%
Health 14%


CPD Website Activities

Total Number of Visitors 1,062,837
Average Duration 18 minutes
Total Duration of Visits 335,839
These figures are compiled from the CPD home website, as well as various project websites

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National & International Presentations




Akers, A.L., Roberts, R., & Russon, T. (2004, April). A web-based application process for families. Catch the Technology Wave Conference, Memphis, TN.

Akers, A.L. (April, 2004). A web-based interagency application process for CSHCN. Champions for Progress Multi-State Meeting, Alexandria, VA.

Akers, A.L. (2004, May). A web-based interagency application process for CSHCN. Champions for Progress Multi-State Meeting, Snowbird, UT.

Akers, A.L., Akers, J., & Boyce, G. (2003, September). Using concepts from infant mental health for continuous quality improvement. International Society for Early Intervention, Rome, Italy.

Akers, A.L., Roberts, R.N., & Johnson, T. (2003, September). Improving family access to services: A web-based interagency application process. International Institute on Family Center Care, Boston, MA.

Akers, A.L., Roberts, R.N., & Johnson, T. (2003, October). Improving family services via a web-based interagency application process. Children with Special Health Care Needs Conference, Groton, CT.

Anderson, S., & Bohman, P. (2003, December). Update on accessibility projects around the world: The WebAIM Project. OZeWAI, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.

Anderson, S., & Bohman, P. (2003, December). WAVE - Software for evaluating and reporting on resource accessibility. OZeWAI, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.

Asher, C., Roggman, L.A., Boyce, L.K., Cook, G. A., & Christiansen, K. (2004, April). Parent-toddler book reading: Fostering a love of reading. Society for Research in Human Development, Park City, Utah.

Baer, R.D., Hammond, M., & Price, R. (2003, November). Boys & Girls Club helping children with disabilities: Preliminary results. Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Bailey, V., Logston, C., Elder, K., Robinson, Z., Thayn, W. R., Boyce, G. C., Akers, J., & Flake, M. (2004, May). Where kids go: A look at the trajectories of youth living situations. Family Strengths Conference, Portland, OR.

Behl, D.D. (2003, October). Medical Home: Providing comprehensive, coordinated care for children with special health needs. Division for Early Childhood, Washington, DC. Behl, D.D., Akers, A.L., & Roberts, R.N. (2003, October). Measuring and monitoring community-based systems of care in the United States. National Association of Pediatric Home and Community Care, Groton, CT.

Behl, D.D., Goetze, L., Roberts, R.N., & Johnson, R. (2003, November). New methods to evaluate different service coordination models for infants and toddlers with special needs. American Evaluation Association, Reno, NV.

Blair, M. (2003, November). Assistive technology: Real people, real independence and the future. National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities, Salt Lake City, UT.

Blair, P. (2004, February). Keeping web accessibility in mind: The state of web accessibility in United States K-12 education. Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Blair, P., & Lyman, M. (2004, March). No Child Left Behind: Is your web site accessiblefi WebAIM's research, resources, and tools. Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Bohman, P., & Anderson, S. (2004, March). WAVE Toolbar: A browser-based web accessibility tool for designers. CSUN Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Bohman, P., & Anderson, S. (2004, June). Progress on WAVE: A multilingual open source accessibility tool. EDMEDIA 2004 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, Lugano, Switzerland.

Boyce, G. (2004, February). InReach technology: To support the transition from NICU to EI. Conference for Research Innovations in Early Intervention, San Diego, CA.

Boyce, G., Akers, A.L., Anderson, J., & Pond, L. (2003, September). NICU and early intervention collaborate to support

parent-infant transition to community services. International Conference on Family-Centered Care, Boston, MA.

Boyce, G.C., Akers, A.L., & Risk, T. (2003, July). Developing technologies to support baby and family in the NICU and beyond. OSEP Project Directors' Meeting, Washington, DC.

Boyce, G.C., Dubrino, T., Sheehan, A., & Soler, R. (2004, June). Using your evaluation data. Training Institutes 2004, San Francisco, CA.

Boyce, G.C., & Risk, T. (2003, November). InReach: Using technology to support the parent-infant dyad during transition to community services. Sixth Technology Project Director's Meeting, Washington, DC. Boyce, L. K. Roggman, L. A., Cook, G. A., & Christiansen, K. (2004, May). Poverty and mother-toddler pretend play: Do mothers make a differencefi International Conference on Infant Studies, Chicago, IL.

Boyce, G., Sampers. J., Browne, J., & Parkee, C. (2004, January). Supporting baby and family in the NICU and beyond. World Association for Infant Mental Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Cheney, D., O'Leary, E., & Williams, J. (2004, April). Transition planning for youth with behavior disorders. Council for Exceptional Children, 2004 Convention & Expo, New Orleans, LA.

Christensen, K. (2004, March). Socially inclusive playground design. Landscape Architecture Student Association, Gainsville, FL.

Christensen, K. (2003, October). Beyond Access: Socially inclusive playground design. National Recreation and Parks Association, St. Louis, MO.

Christensen, K. (2003, September). Beyond Access: Socially inclusive playground design. National Institute on Inclusive Recreation, Bloomington, MN.

Cook, G. A., Boyce, L. K., & Innocenti, M.S. (2004, April). Shared book reading: Promoting literacy strategies in Hispanic families. Society for Research in Human Development, Park City, Utah.

Cook, G.A., Boyce, L. K., Jump, V. K., Roggman, L. A., & Innocenti, M.S. (2004, May). Hispanic mother's warmth and support: A look at context and stability. International Conference on Infant Studies, Chicago, IL.

Cook, G. A., Roggman, L. A. (2004, June). Promoting language development in an Early Head Start home visiting program: What makes it workfi Head Start Research Conference, Washington, DC.

Copenhaver, J. (2003, November). MPRRC and small states. National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Louisville, KY.

Copenhaver, J. (2003, May). The role and function of State Special Education Advisory Panels in Office of Special Education large-scale initiatives. OSEP Leadership Conference, Washington DC.

Copenhaver, J. (2004, June). Scaling up: The Regional Assessment System for the evaluation of school-based sign language interpreters. RAS Advisory Board Meeting, CO.

Copenhaver, J. (2004, June). Creating a comprehensive system of special education general supervision. Bureau of Indian Affairs Monitoring Conference, Albuquerque, NM.

Copenhaver, J. (2003, May). Creating the perfect consolidated school reform plan amendment. Bureau of Indian Affairs Agency CSRP National Training, Albuquerque, NM.

Fifield, M., McClain, C., Carroll, R., & Canizales, F. (2003, November). Indian Children's Program. Association of University Centers on Disability, Washington DC.

Gimpel, G., & Ehrlick, A. (2003, August). Maternal and parental attributions for children's compliant and noncompliant behavior. American Psychological Association, Toronto, Canada.

Gimpel, G., & Ehrlick, A. (2003, November). Parental perceptions of children's behavior. Association of Advancement of Behavior, Boston, MA.

Hansen, K. (2004, April). Correlation between infant reactivity and maternal emotional well-being. Society for Research in Human Development, Park City, UT.

Hammond, M., Jimenez, M., & Summers, L. (2004, March). Marketing and outreach to underserved populations. Pacific Rim Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, HI.

Hatch, T., Roggman, L.A., Jones, D., & Cook, G. A. (2004, April). Are foods femininefi Father, toddler-play, gender, and toy preference. Society for Research in Human Development, Park City, Utah.

Hofmeister, A.M. (2003, November). The paraeducator as an effective math instructor. Paraeducator National Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.

Holt, J., & Sheen, J. (2003, November). Participatory action research, diversity, and the Utah work incentive initiative. Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Innocenti, M.S. (2004, February). A wolf in sheep's clothing: Are we really doing social marketing in early interventionfi Conference for Research Innovations in Early Intervention, San Diego, CA.

Innocenti, M.S. (2003, October). Quality indicators in group experimental research. International Conference on Young Children with Special Needs and their Families, Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children, Washington, DC.

Innocenti, M.S., & Boyce. L. (2003, November). Linking to pre-literacy: Predictors of Spanish-speaking children's language skills. International Dyslexia Association, San Diego, CA.

Innocenti, M.S., Cora Price, & Jesinoski, M. (2000, January). A longitudinal study of children once enrolled in special education. Conference for Research Innovations in Early Intervention, San Diego, CA.

Innocenti, M.S., Risk, T., & Alsop, L. (2003, November). Project RIITE. Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Johnson, T., Benward, M., Boyce, G.C., Price, C., & Pasmann, G. (2004, May). Does the work of a family facilitator increase the effectiveness of mental health servicesfi Family Strengths Conference, Portland, OR.

Jump, V. (2003, October). Infant massage: Effects on illness in infants in Ecuadorian and Haitian orphanages. American Massage Therapy Association National Conference, Richmond, VA.

Lyman, M. (2004, March). Web Accessibility Resource Planner (WARP): A modular curriculum for web accessibility teacher development in K-12 education. Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education 2004 International Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Lyman, M., & Anderson, S. (2004, March). A reform model and curriculum for web accessibility in K-12 education. CSUN Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Lyman, M., & Anderson, S. (2004, June). Web accessibility resource planner: A modular curriculum for web accessibility teacher development in K-12 education. EDMEDIA 2004, World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, Lugano, Switzerland.

Mariger, H. (2004, April). Creating a useful website by including families as participant-developers. Catch the Technology Wave, Memphis, TN. Nittrouer, S. (2004, February). Early development of children with hearing loss. National Meeting of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, Washington, DC.

Nittrouer, S. (2004, February). Crossing the research/clinical divide. AGBell Summit on Deafness, Washington, DC.

Nittrouer, S. (2004, May). From ears to cortex and back again: The co-dependent relationship between speech perception and language. Hearing Research Foundation Conference, Providence, RI. Odom, S.L., Wolery, M., McWillian, R., & Innocenti, M.S. (2003, October). Research methods for establishing evidence-based practice in early intervention/early childhood special education. Division for Early Childhood, Washington, DC.

Olvey, G. (2004, June.) Challenges to access to the general curriculum for secondary students with intellectual disabilities. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities, Montpellier, France.

Olvey, G., & Massanari, C. (2003, December). Responsiveness to intervention. National Research Center on Learning Disabilities, Kansas City, MO.

Pavia, T. (2003, October). Stimulating relevant research interest in the academic business community. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.

Pavia, T. (2004, January). Evaluation and revision of LEND health administration curriculum. Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Washington, DC.

Price, R., & Price, K. (2004, March). Sensory impairment training. Pacific Rim Conference, Honolulu, HI.

Price, C., Innocenti, M.S. & Jesinoski, M.J. (2003, October). The school career of Utah children once enrolled in early childhood special education. International Conference on Young Children with Special Needs and their Families, the Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children, Washington, DC.

Roberts, R.N. (2004, April). Taking the first steps: Critical practices in EI/ECSE for infants and young children with deaf-blindness. National Technical Assistance Consortium, Tampa, FL.

Roberts, R. N. (2004, March). Bringing everyone to the table in systems change: Developing a system of care. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.

Roberts, R. N., Behl, D.D., Read, D., & Watters, K. (2004, March). Champions for Progress Center: Leadership development for implementation of systems of care for CYSHCN. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.

Roberts, R. N. (2004, February). R. T. research is like a carnival gopher game: How do you keep the unexplained variables from popping upfi Annual Conference on Research Innovation in Early Intervention, San Diego, CA.

Roberts, R. N., Behl, D.D. D., Goetze, L. D., & Johnson, R. (2004, February). An outcomes-based approach to evaluating Part C service coordination models. Annual Conference on Research Innovation in Early Intervention, San Diego, CA.

Roberts, R. N., Akers, A.L., & Behl, D.D. (2003, October). The Champions for Progress Center. Annual Federal/State Partnership Meeting, Washington, DC.

Roberts, R. N., Behl, D.D., & Akers, A.L. (2003, October). Breathing action into research! Using participatory models to improve community-based systems. Division for Early Childhood Conference, Washington, DC.

Roberts, R. N., Akers, A.L., & Johnson, T. (2003, October). Universal Application System: A family-friendly web-based interagency application process. Division for Early Childhood Conference, Washington, DC.

Roberts, R. N., Akers, A.L., & Behl, D.D. (2003, September). Using participatory action research to affect service integration strategies at the community level. International Society on Early Intervention, Rome, Italy.

Roberts, R.N., & Behl, D.D. (2004, March). Champions for Progress: Systems of care for CYSHCN. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.

Roggman, L. A., & Boyce, L. K., Cook, G. A., Christiansen, K., & Jones, D. (2004, May). Playing with daddy: Social toy play, Early Head Start, and developmental outcomes. International Conference on Infant Studies, Chicago, IL.

Roggman, L.A., Cook, G. A., Christiansen, K., Boyce, L. K., & Callow-Huesser, C. (2004, April). Three generations of attachment. Society for Research in Human Development, Park City, Utah.

Roggman, L. A., Cook, G. A., & Akers, J. F. (2004, May). Attachment Q-set measures: Reliability and stability in three samples. International Conference on Infant Studies, Chicago, IL.

Roggman, L. A., & Cook, G. A., (2004, June). Who drops out of Early Head Start home visiting programsfi Head Start Research Conference, Washington, DC.

Rowland, C. (June, 2004). The National Center on Disability and Access to Education. EDMEDIA 2004 World Con ference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, Lugano, Switzerland.

Rowland, C. (April, 2004). Oh what a terrible web we weave . . . .A primer on web accessibility. Catch The Wave Technology Conference, Memphis, TN.

Rowland, C. (March, 2004). National Center on Disability and Access to Education: Present and future. Pacific Rim 2004 Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, HI.

Rowland, C. (March, 2004). Keeping web accessibility in mind in K-12 education. Pacific Rim 2004 Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, HI.

Rowland, C. (Sept., 2003). Understanding legal issues with online courses, online materials, and students with disabilities. Webcast for the Instructional Technology Council: The Community College Distance Learning Organization.

Rowland, C. (July, 2003). Accessibility to e-learning technologies for individuals with disabilities. Western Cooperative for Educational Telecommunications' Institute for Managing and Developing e-Learning, Park City, UT.

Rowland, C. (July, 2003). Conversations on using distance learning methods to deliver technical assistance and education. Education Line Office Summer Institute on Special Education, sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Center for School Improvement. Albuquerque, NM.

Rowland, C., & Blair, M. (March 2004). The present and future: National Center on Disability and Access to Education. CSUN Technology and Disability Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Rowland, C. (Jan., 2004). Web accessibility: Our legal obligation in education. Keynote address at the Johns Hopkins Mini-Conference on Web Accessibility, Baltimore, MD.

Rowland, C. (Dec., 2003). Keeping web accessibility in mind (WebAIM). FIPSE 2003 Project Directors Meeting, Denver, CO.

Rule, S., Holt, J. Copenhaver, J., Peck, J., Nielsen, J., Richins, G., Smith, K., & Rowland, C. (2004, November). CPD: Building stronger communities through diversity. Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Rule, S., Mariger, H., Benitz, C., Blair, M., Menlove, R., Rowland, C., & Salzberg, C. (2004, March). NCDAE: Accessibility in higher education and practice. American Council on Rural Special Education, Orlando, FL.

Rous, B., & Innocenti, M.S. (2003, November). Opening doors to success: The National Early Childhood Transition Center. Association of University Centers on Disabilities Annual Meeting, Bethesda, MD.

Sheen, J. (2003, November). Coordinated family supports: A rural medical home project. Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Sheen, J. (2004, March). The medical home learning collaborative: Building medical homes for children with special health care needs. National Initiative for Children's Healthcare, San Diego, CA.

Smith, J. (2004, March). Captioning web multimedia - an overview of processes, technologies, resources, and tools. Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Smith, J. (2004, June). Captioning on-demand and real-time web multimediafi Easy-to-use tools for educators. EDMEDIA 2004 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, Lugano, Switzerland.

Smith, J., & Rowland, C. (Feb., 2004). Maximizing accessibility of synchronous audio/video instruction. EASI Interactive, Synchronous, Voice Web Conference Clinic.

Torres, A.R. (2004, March). Autoimmune associations in autism. International Neurology Conference, Santiago, Cuba.

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Project Directory

ADMINISTRATIVE PROJECTS
Administrative Support Services
Program Development and Administration

TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROJECTS
ABC's of Nursing Home Transition
Addressing New Staff Training in Independent Living Centers
Agrability Utah
Arizona ACPE/SIG Activities
Arizona Center for Professions in Education
Arizona General Supervision (Data Collection)
Arizona Transition to Teaching Project
Autism Support Services: Education, Research & Training
Beyond Access
Boys & Girls Club Helping Children with Disabilities
Bureau of Indian Affairs Complaint Investigation
Bureau of Indian Affairs Due Process/Mediation Procedures
Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Education ISEP Verification Audits
Bureau of Indian Affairs Part B Application/CRSP Revision
Bureau of Indian Affairs Schoolwide Monitoring
Champions for Progress Center
Child Care Nutrition Program
Collaborative Early Childhood Special Education Program
Coordinated Family Support: A Medical Home for Children with Special Health Care Needs
Election Worker Training
Estimator '03-'04
Evaluation of Utah One-Stop Enhancement Project
Getting it Together
Hispanic Paraeducator Initiative
Independent Living Staff Orientation Module Development
Indian Children's Program
Interagency Outreach Training Initiative
Interdisciplinary Training
Leisure and Recreation for Differently-Abled Kids
Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center
Multi-University Consortium Teacher Training Progam
New Mexico-Building Capacity to Improve Services to Students with Disabilities
Northern Utah Area health Education Center (NUAHEC)
On-Line Courses for Independent Living Center Staff
Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support
Providing On-Line courses for Independent Living Staff
Public Health 101: Introduction to Public Health
Regional Education Interpreter Assessment System (RAS)
Rocky Mountain Public Health Education Consortium
Strategic Planning & Needs Assessment Technical Assistance/Utah State Office of Rehabilitation
The Utah Traumatic Brain Injury Implementation Grant
Utah ADA Steering Committee
Utah Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Regional Program (ULEND)
Utah Legislative Coalition for Persons with Disabilities
Utah One-Stop Enhancement Project
WebAIM K-12
Workability Utah Work Incentive Initiative-Training (UWIN)

DISSEMINATION PROJECTS
CPD Publications
Family Resource Library
IBM Advanced Web Accessibility Education Course
LENDlinks
Reading for All Learners Program
Repurposing Olmstead Training Materials
Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Settings (SPIES)
K-SAR Video Production and Distance Learning

DIRECT SERVICE PROJECTS
Bear River Activity and Skill Center
Clinical Services
CPD Feeding and Nutrition Clinic
Medical Clinic
Specialty Clinics
Telework
Up-to-3 Early Intervention
Utah Alternative Financing Program
Utah Assistive Technology Program

RESEARCH PROJECTS
An Outcomes-based Approach to Evaluating Part C Service Coordination Models
Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support
Bottom-up Modelling of Mass Pedestrian Flows
Continuing Follow-up of Utah Students Exiting Special Education
Cost of EHDI Programs
Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss
Effects of Infant Massage in Haitian Orphanages
InReach Technology Project
Measuring and Monitoring Community-based Integrated Systems of Care
System for Assisted navigation in Dynamic and Complex Environments
The Ontogeny of Segmental Speech Organization
Utah Early Collaborative Medical Home Project Evaluation
Utah Early Intervention Project Followup
Utah Frontiers Project

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Project Descriptions

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES



Contact Person: Sarah Rule

Funding Source & Amount: Utah State Legislature, Overhead from Grants and Contracts, $1,235,685

Description:
University funds support both the work of divisions and the administrative functions that assist all programs operated by the CPD. They provide the match required for externally funded research, education, services, and dissemination projects. The administrative support necessary to conduct these projects includes computer networking, hardware and software consultation, media development, information dissemination, accounting and purchasing services, procedural assistance with university reporting and regulations, and assistance to consumers and families.


PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Contact Person: Sarah Rule

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administation on Developmental Disabilities, $397,973

Description:
The Center for Persons with Disabilities seeks to support the independence, community inclusion, exercise of choices, and improvements in the quality of life of consumers with disabilities and their families. Since 1972, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities has provided core support for the administration and program development activities of the CPD. The core functions include interdisciplinary education, dissemination of information, exemplary services, and research and evaluation to promote independence and inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities into all aspects of community life. CPD faculty and staff who receive support from ADD core funding engage with other agencies and organizations of consumers with developmental disabilities to provide technical assistance and consultation to federal, state, and local service agencies; to help link resources; and to promote systems change. They generate external funding for these activities, currently conducted through approximately 70 programs and projects.


TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROJECTS



ABC'S OF NURSING HOME TRANSITION

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Department of Education, Office of Special Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, $29,450

Description:
This project is working to develop and test pilot a training module for Nursing Facility Transition. The training is not about 'why' - it is about 'how'. Training and technical assistance will focus on a hands-on approach, using real case studies, examples and problem-solving techniques in order to build skills, not just awareness and knowledge. Materials will include a variety of checklists designed to guide the individual through each phase of transition. Training will be conducted in small 'transition team' settings designed to teach problem-solving and facilitation skills. The training must be state-specific (Medicaid) and state/locality-specific (housing). Trainee recipients will complete assignments to investigate available resources and programs within their specific states. Materials will include reference identifiers in each state. Trainees will be able to demonstrate internet search skills and use a multimedia approach to include written materials, CD Rom, DVD, and audio tape/CD. Materials will be developed in accessible formats and written in language that is 'readable' to frontline staff. Trainees will be evaluated based on demonstrated skills and knowledge of the transition steps. Periodic conference call follow-up can be facilitated to determine obstacles faced by participants and sharpen skills.


ADDRESSING NEW STAFF TRAINING IN INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS

Contact Person: Jeff Sheen

Funding Source & Amount: Independent Living Research Utilization, $4,000

Description:
This project involved developing learning objectives/content requirements for an IL-NET Olmstead training course, establishing a workplan for development of the training modules, reviewing/identifying existing materials and resources for training, and conducting a strategic planning meeting with three content experts in Houston, Texas.


AGRABILITY UTAH

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source & Amount: Subcontract with project funded by U.S. Department of Agriculture, $6,975

Description:
Agrability Utah serves farmers and ranchers with disabilities as well as other members of the agribusiness community and their families. The project's primary goal is to assist individuals to remain employed in agribusiness. It is a cooperative effort between Utah State University's Agricultural Systems Technology and Education Department (ASTE) and Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) as well as Utah's four independent living centers. Project staff engage in extensive outreach efforts, as well as providing direct information and referral, assistive technology, and peer counseling services. CPD staff cooperated with ASTE in writing the original proposal to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. They have also played a continuing role in providing program evaluation and other technical assistance. During the July 1, 2003 to May 1, 2003 period, they continued to fulfill this role, and, in addition, made a presentation at the National Agrability Training Work in Omaha, Nebraska. Following the workshop staff have continued to participate in a national workgroup focused on issues in working with minority cultures. Finally, CPD staff participated in Agrability Utah's annual meeting held in Price UT on May 29, 2004.


ARIZONA ACPE/SIG ACTIVITIES

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Arizona Department of Education, $92,799

Description:
The MPRRC will work with the Arizona Department of Education to improve the education system by implementing a number of objectives and activities to meet three goals: (1) To provide sufficient numbers of certified special ed teachers; (2) To ensure that students with disabilities in charter schools have access to quality programs; and (3) To attain statistically significant reading gains through the use of scientifically-based research validated strategies.


ARIZONA CENTER FOR PROFESSIONS IN EDUCATION

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Arizona Department of Education $183,339

Description:
This project addresses the national shortage of educators who serve children with disabilities. The MPRRC will be working in conjunction with the Arizona Center for Professions in Education, a recruitment and retention program for staffing special education, regular education, and administrative personnel throughout the state of Arizona.


ARIZONA GENERAL SUPERVISION (DATA COLLECTION)

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Arizona Department of Education $10,000

Description:
The MPRRC is working with the Arizona Department of Education to shape the accountability of special education system in ways that drive and support improved results for children with disabilities and their families and will focus on establishing ongoing and reliable statewide systems that will document and enhance accountability through the CIMP.


ARIZONA TRANSITION TO TEACHING PROJECT

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Arizona Department of Education $53,298

Description:
The MPRRC will work with the Arizona Department of Education to design new comprehensive customized and effective models of long-distance learning, alternative routes to certification, marketing and benefits, programs, teacher and principal training, and mentoring follow-up.


AUTISM SUPPORT SERVICES: EDUCATION, RESEARCH & TRAINING

Contact Person: Thomas Higbee

Funding Source & Amount: Utah State Office of Education, CPD , Fees for Service, $40,000

Description:
The national increase in individuals identified as having autism spectrum disorders is also occurring in rural Utah. However, intensive treatment programs are limited, especially in the northern area of the state. ASSERT (Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training) provides services to preschool children with autism. Its goal is to promote the development of critical communication and social skills so that children will succeed in inclusive school classrooms. Intervention procedures are data based, derived from research in applied behavior analysis, and incorporate validated curriculum materials. The program also serves as a training site for graduate and undergraduate students from three disciplines and for personnel from education agencies in Utah. In the program's first year, 16 undergraduate and 8 graduate students participated in service delivery. Inservice education included a summer workshop for special education and related service personnel from education agencies statewide. Families participate in supports and serve on a community advisory board along with agency and university representatives. The program is a collaborative effort of several university departments and the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities.


BEYOND ACCESS: INCLUSIVE OUTDOOR PLAY SPACES FOR CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

Contact Person: Keith Christensen

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Developmental Disabilities, $133,839

Description:
The Beyond Access project is a project of national significance emphasizing the inclusion of children with disabilities in public play environments. Supported by the Administration on Developmental, through 2004, the Beyond Access project provides technical assistance to both consumers and designers and manufacturers of outdoor playground equipment and environments. The project's educational tools focus on ability rather than disability, emphasizing accessibility (physical access) as well as inclusion (social access) in outdoor play environments. In addition to direct technical assistance, a variety of educational materials and guidance is available at www.beyondac-cess.org.


BOYS & GIRLS CLUB HELPING CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Developmental Disabilities, $138,072

Description:
The project is a cooperative effort between Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD), the Lincoln Center Boys & Girls Club (B & G Club), and Box Elder School District. Using a modified educational research and development model, curriculum materials are being developed to teach minority/disadvantaged youth about disabilities and careers in disabilities fields. Over 50 students wishing to participate will be identified through the B & G Club and school districts. They will be trained through a series of classroom and practicum experiences incorporating opportunities to work with people with disabilities in a variety of inclusive settings. Service learning/citizenship credit, university credit, and a variety of prizes for training completion will be offered as incentives for participation. As a result of the project, students will:
  1. Gain knowledge of disabilities and careers in the disability field;
  2. Show improved attitudes toward individuals with disabilities;
  3. Be more likely to plan or consider planning a career in the disabilities field; and
  4. Express a high level of satisfaction with the training program.
Materials developed will allow for replication and be disseminated via a web page, publications, conference presentations. Thus, the project will have the potential for impacting communities across the nation. During the July 1, 2003 -May 1, 2004 period, training was provided for several groups of students. An initial group from the Dale Young Community High School and a group from the Lincoln Cen ter Boys & Girls Club participated in field trips and practicum experiences during July and August. Data on these groups indicated that as a result of the complete training experience:
  1. Knowledge about disabilities increased dramatically;
  2. Attitudes toward people with disabilities improved moderately;
  3. Plans to work with people with disabilities after completing education increased for a few participants; and
Satisfaction with the program was high. These data were presented at AUCD's annual meeting and conference. Based on experiences with the first two groups the curriculum and scope and sequence for the program were revised as were some of the evaluation instruments. A second group from the high school participated in the revised training between August and December. The program proved so popular at the high school that the principal requested it be repeated during each of the school's trimesters. It was also repeated during the summer for members of the Boys & Girls Club and youth from Workforce Incentive Act (WIA) program. Preliminary plans have been made for project continuation and dissemination. . A project webpage can be accessed at www.disability-careers.org. Finally, articles have been drafted that will appear in two CPD publications, CPD News and Parent News.


BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS COMPLAINT INVESTIGATION

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, $92,180

Description:
The purpose of this project is to provide technical assistance to ensure that the Bureau of Indian Affairs/Office of Indian Education Programs meets the legal responsibility specified in CRR 300.660.300.552 by establishing process and training staff to address complaints in a timely and effective manner.


BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS DUE PROCESS/MEDIATION PROCEDURES

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Bureau of Indian Affairs, $104,465

Description:
The MPRRC will provide technical assistance for ensuring the Bureau of Indian Affairs /Office of Indian Education Programs meets the legal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for due process mediation procedures. The purpose of the project is to recruit and train contract due process hearing officers and mediators to handle requests under the direct supervision of BIA/OIEP staff.


BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS SPECIAL EDUCATION ISEP VERIFICATION AUDITS

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Bureau of Indian Affairs, $311,746

Description:
The MPRRC works with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to develop and implement a new BIA special education monitoring process that focuses on positive results for children with disabilities in BIA operated, grant, and contract schools.


BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS PART B APPLICATION/CSRP REVISION

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Bureau of Indian Affairs, $105,312

Description:
This project assists in compliance monitoring and evaluation at Bureau of Indian Affairs funded schools.


BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS SCHOOLWIDE MONITORING

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: Department of Interior, $473,880

Description:
Conduct required compliance monitoring and evaluation at Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) funded schools throughout the country.


CHAMPIONS FOR PROGRESS CENTER

Contact Person: Richard Roberts

Funding Source & Amount: Maternal & Child Health Bureau $1,100,000

Description:
Children with special health care needs typically receive disjointed services from a number of public and private agencies, making it difficult for families to access the services they need. The Champions for Progress Center provides support to state Title V Children with Special Health Care Needs Programs in the implementation of community based systems of services for children and youth with special health care needs. Activities will assist in accomplishing the President's New Freedom Initiative. The Center will develop the capacity of State Title V leadership to coordinate and integrate systems building efforts as described in the President's New Freedom Initiative, working in partnership with families, communities, and other agencies and organizations. The objectives are to: 1) Develop and maintain the public/private partnerships through a participatory action approach; 2) Coordinate state plans and activities with partners around the six core measures for CSHCN; 3) Implement community-based service integration strategies; and 4) Apply measurement and monitoring strategies to more accurately demonstrate progress. Community-based systems will be measured by six national outcomes: Family Participation and Satisfaction, Access to Medical Home, Access to Affordable Insurance, Early and Continuous Screening, Easy-to-Access Community-based Service Systems, and Services Necessary to Transition to Adulthood.


CHILD CARE NUTRITION PROGRAM

Contact Person: Jeanie Peck

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Education, $137,419

Description:
This project administers the child care nutrition program for family home child care providers. Children form healthy eating habits in their early childhood years. The lessons they learn in childhood may last a lifetime. Good eating habits do not just happen-they must be learned. Presenting children with a variety of nutritious foods can help them learn to make nutritionally sound food choices. All child care providers are encouraged to support positive eating habits by introducing children to new foods, encouraging favorable attitudes toward food and encouraging children to eat a variety of foods.
The Nutrition Program is a federally funded program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Child and Adult Care Food Program. It is designed to offer aid to assist day care homes provide nutritious meals to children ages 12 and under, or to adults with a verified disability who receive care in a licensed day care home. Funding is disseminated through the Utah State Office of Education Child Nutrition Programs. Licensed child care providers receive training in standards of quality day care and nutrition program guidelines. Providers must attend food program training every year, and they also receive support and technical assistance. Family day care providers can be reimbursed for a maximum of two meals and one snack for each child each day. The provider submits a monthly claim to the Child Care Nutrition Program for the meals they have served and is reimbursed at one of two levels. The higher level of reimbursement is assigned when the provider is located in a low-income area, is a low-income household, and/or serves children who are from low-income households.


COLLABORATIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM THROUGH DISTANCE EDUCATION

Contact Person: Marlene Deer

Funding Source & Amount: Utah State Office of Education, Services for Students, $199,842

Description:
CECSEP is an off-campus, distance education program which is housed at the Center for Persons with Disabilities. CECSEP provides the necessary coursework to prepare educators to work with children who have disabilities from birth to age five and their families. Many CECSEP students live far from one of the two institutions of higher education in Utah that offer coursework leading to an early childhood special education (ECSE) teaching certificate (i.e., Utah State University and the University of Utah). As a result, there is a shortage of properly credentialed ECSE teachers in our state, particularly in rural districts. To ameliorate this problem, the Utah State Office of Education has partnered with USU to increase the number of personnel certified in ECSE in remote and rural areas of our state. Most of the students involved in CECSEP are those who work full time in ECSE without proper certification. Typically students take two courses per semester until they have completed their program. The specialization ECSE coursework is delivered through multiple technologies including: (a) The statewide EDNET system which provides fully-interactive, real-time, televised broadcasts; (b) Video-conferencing computer software; and (c) The Internet. CECSEP coursework is supported with a Web site (http://www.cecsep.usu.edu) where students can link to course materials, assignments (including the analysis of brief video clips), participate in " chats " with other students and instructors, and obtain information about program requirements, and advisement. Students complete practicum and student/clinical teaching requirements in their own, or nearby, communities. Supervision of these students is conducted by CECSEP personnel onsite and at a distance using video-conferenc-ing software in real-time. Although CECSEP is funded on a year-to-year basis by the Utah State Office of Education, Services for Students at Risk, it has operated successfully since 1994 and more than 60 students have graduated.


COORDINATED FAMILY SUPPORT: A MEDICAL HOME FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL HEALTH CARE NEEDS (CFS)

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: CPD*

Description:
The Coordinated Family Support (CFS) project is designed to partner with the Budge Clinic, Medical Services, and Interdisciplinary Training at the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) to provide a medical home for families and their children with special health care needs. The project focuses on providing medical home services to families within the catchment area of the Budge Clinic, which includes parts of nine rural counties in UT, ID, and WY. At least 100 families who have CSHCN will receive resource information, assistance, and support in accessing programs and services that they have identified as important to their child and family. The Budge Clinic will be more knowledgeable about the barriers and challenges facing families with CSHCN. All families who have the Budge Clinic as their child's Medical Home, will benefit directly from the increased skills of the clinic staff and will have stronger access to and connections with other families to provide ongoing support. Although originally funded for one fiscal year, an additional $5,000 has been provided by the UCEDD to compensate an additional parent partner that has been added to the project team. Additionally, UCEDD staff time has been covered to continue the project for an additional year. At the beginning of the second project year, the medical home team was invited by the state Title V agency to join a national learning collaborative sponsored by NICHQ and the American Academy of Pediatrics. As one of three medical home teams from Utah (and 1 of 40 practices from 11 states) participating in the collaborative, the Coordinated Family Support project has made significant improvements in the provision of a medical home for CSHCN. The CFS project is currently serving over 50 families with 50 more in the process of being brought into the program. Future efforts will focus on establishing additional parent advocacy resources and working with the local Hispanic Health Coalition to better meet the needs of CSHCN for culturally diverse families.


ELECTION WORKER TRAINING

Contact Person: Martin Blair

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Office of Elections, $10,000

Description:
The CPD was contracted to develop a training module for nearly 6,000 election poll workers in Utah. This training, to be provided prior to the 2004 federal election, teaches poll workers about various disabilities and appropriate accommodations in the voting process. We are working closely with the Utah Director of Elections, state Disability Law Center and state Developmental Disabilities Council to ensure that training content is accurate, consumer friendly and appropriate.


ESTIMATOR '03 - '04

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source & Amount: Utah State Office of Education $15,000

Description:
In order to qualify a student for special education services under the learning disability category, it must be shown that he/she has a severe discrepancy between aptitude (IQ) and achievement. Estimator is a software program developed for the state of Utah that calculates severe discrepancy using a formula adopted by the state. Users input demographic information on the student along with intelligence and achievement test scores. Based on the information the program generates a report describing the probability that the difference in the two scores represents a severe discrepancy. Under the current contract, CPD Outreach Division staff are providing technical assistance supporting the product, and working with a state level committee to in preparation for publishing the next version of Estimator.


EVALUATION OF UTAH ONE-STOP ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Workforce Services, $53,600

Description:
The Utah One-Stop Enhancement project is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor to improve employment of people with disabilities in the state. In pursuit of its mission the project is investigating a number of strategies including training program navigators to assist people with disabilities in navigating the service system, training Division of Workforce Services staff about people with disabilities, reaching out to employers regarding people with disabilities, and reviewing facility accessibility, among others. CPD Outreach Division staff are helping by providing evaluation expertise and technical assistance.


GETTING IT TOGETHER: FAMILY SUPPORT 360 MODEL IMPLEMENTATION PLAN DEVELOPMENT FOR UTAH

Contact Person: Sue Olsen

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Developmental Disabilities, $133,334

Description:
Using a participatory action model, an implementation plan will be designed for a comprehensive one-stop family support center serving a targeted geographic area on the west side of Salt Lake City. The families in this rapidly growing area are culturally and linguistically diverse, are generally underserved by the existing formal service systems, and often face economic challenges. The model one-stop family support center will be designed to serve at least 50 families who have children or adult members with developmental disabilities. A major activity will be to convene a rich coalition of partners including target families, the Sorenson Multicultural Community Center (a city-owned and operated community center serving the target area), community service organizations, Administration on Developmental Disabilities-funded programs, state agencies, the Mayor and City Council, local business, faith-based organizations, the Salt Lake School District, and disability advocacy groups. This impressive array of partners will:
  1. identify barriers to the development of a one-stop family support center;
  2. develop consensus on appropriate outcomes, guiding principles, and implementation strategies;
  3. catalog the resources and assets available in the community wherein the target families reside;
  4. review state and federal laws and policies that impact target families, and determine strategies to revise policy and/or procedures in order for a center to operate successfully;
  5. draft policies and memoranda of understanding to efficiently and effectively achieve a family-centered one-stop family support center; and
  6. design and approve a comprehensive implementation plan for a culturally-responsive one-stop family support center to preserve, strengthen, and maintain targeted families.


HISPANIC PARAEDUCATOR INITIATIVE

Contact Person: Jeanie Peck

Funding Source & Amount: Subcontract, Weber State University $18,000

Description:
The Hispanic Paraeducator Initiative is designed to support the employment and training of members of the local Hispanic community as paraeducators (classroom assistants, teacher aides) in local schools. Participants may be high school students or adult members of the community. The beneficiaries of this initiative include: young Hispanic students, who receive classroom support from a cultural peer who is also a role model of academic success; and the Hispanic paraeducators, who are provided with employment, an insight into education as a career option, and increased self-esteem as their skills and contributions are valued. School district personnel learn to appreciate the contribution that the Hispanic community can make to school culture and success, including bilingual/translation services.


INDEPENDENT LIVING STAFF ORIENTATION MODULE DEVELOPMENT

Contact Person: Jefferson Sheen

Funding Source & Amount: Independent Living Research Utilization Contract, $50,274

Description:
This project involved subcontracting with four content experts and an instructional technologist to develop an in-depth outline for each of four training modules (History and Roots of Independent Living; Emergence of the Independent Living Movement; 'Codification' of Independent Living Movement; Challenges Facing Independent Living); constructing four comprehensive training modules using multimedia materials; piloting training modules; making final edits to material based on feedback from the pilot participants; and reproducing the final product on CD-ROM for widespread distribution.


INDIAN CHILDREN'S PROGRAM

Contact Person: Marvin Fifield

Funding Source & Amount: Indian Health Services, $691,281

Description:
This program provides diagnostic and clinical services to Indian children and families referred by the Indian Health Service, tribal organizations and other community-based programs on the Navajo, Hopi, and multi Pueblo reservations in New Mexico, southern Colorado, and southern Utah. In addition, technical assistance and training is provided to the referring organizations in meeting the needs of children referred. The program is administered by the CPD as a consortium with the University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research, and Services in New Mexico and Arizona as consortium members. An organizational consortium and management structure provides direction and evaluation to the project. The unique focus of the ICP program is that services are delivered in the homes and communities where the children live. Training and technical assistance provided by project staff are determined by the clinical needs of the children referred who are unable to obtain services from other resources.


INTERAGENCY OUTREACH TRAINING INITIATIVE

Contact Person: Sarah Rule

Funding Source & Amount: Utah State Legislature, $60,000

Description:
To systematically address the outreach training needs in Utah, state funding was obtained by the CPD to assist Utah's disability service agencies and consumer organizations in providing essential training and technical assistance. The Interagency Outreach Training Initiative (IOTI) addresses training gaps, particularly those where other funding is not available such as paraprofessional education. In addition, the IOTI facilitates coordination of training efforts among disability service agencies and consumer groups in Utah. State agencies and organizations of consumers and families throughout the state participate in establishing training priorities and approving proposals for training activities. Participating organizations include the Office of Rehabilitation Services, the Utah State Office of Education's Services to Students at Risk, Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Division of Community and Family Health, Division of Mental Health, Division of Aging and Adult Services, Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, and the Utah Parent Center. Consumer representatives are appointed by the Governor's Council. The project has provided continuous funding to train paraprofessionals and consumers in the areas of supported employment, positive behavioral supports, and interpreter certification. Aging, assistive technology, self determination, early intervention, and minority outreach have been constant areas of need targeted for short term projects. Ten individual projects were funded through the IOTI during the 2003-04 fiscal year. These projects, along with accompanying outcome information, are listed separately.


IOTI - COMPETENCY-BASED ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY TRAINING

Contact Person: Martin Blair

Funding Amount: $45,000

Description:
Collaborating partners from the Utah Assistive Technology Program, the Utah Parent Center, the Disability Law Center, the Bureau of Children with Special Health Care Needs, the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Center for Persons with Disabilities combined resources to provide 34 hours of training to date to approximately 1,240 individuals including persons with disabilities, parents, providers, occupational and physical therapists, special education teachers, speech and language pathologists, etc., throughout Utah. Through live and electronic means, training participants (a) understand and apply their understanding of assistive technology related laws and policies; (b) conduct appropriate assessment evaluation for individual consumers AT needs through case studies, (c) learn how to use simple AT and how to provide simple maintenance and repair of simple AT, (d) become familiar with new and emerging technologies, and (e) become familiar with various funding and information resources. The training was delivered through five topical training modules. Existing materials developed by the Utah Assistive Technology Program and the Center for Persons with Disabilities were combined into one training curriculum for live and web-based training presentations.


IOTI - CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES: CRISIS INTERVENTION TEAM CERTIFICATION

Contact Person: Krista Dunn

Funding Amount: $14,000

Description:
In July of 2000, through an IOTI grant, the Salt Lake City Police Department developed and implemented a training program for police officers in which they would gain knowledge of mental illness and procedures for carrying out their law enforcement responsibilities with safety and sensitivity. Through this program a statewide certification program was put into place, and more than 100 Utah officers have been trained and certified in the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program. An additional 612 individuals received CIT introductory training, including law enforcement officers, mental health providers, law enforcement dispatchers, victim advocates, youth and family specialists, concerned citizens, security personnel, professionals, consumers and family members. The SLC Police Department continues to partner with other agencies to provide this needed project in Salt Lake City and participating areas. Most importantly, mental health consumers are learning to recognize the logo/pin that each CIT member wears on his/her uniform and to understand that the officer is there to help. Awareness of mental health issues is escalating as a direct result of the Crisis Intervention Team program. Agencies other than the Salt Lake City Police Department are starting to realize the benefits of a Crisis Intervention Team and are writing policies to support these programs.


IOTI-FAMILY EDUCATION (MINORITY POPULATIONS): REACH OUT - REACH BACK

Contact Person: Helen Post

Funding Amount: $30,000

Description:
A cadre of 18 community parent trainers from urban and rural communities representing primarily two minority groups - Hispanic and Native American - were recruited and trained. They, in turn, provided outreach, information, training, and support to other parents and professionals in their community to establish mentoring relationships with them, to assist them in accessing services and programs, and to prepare them to participate effectively in the IEP and other planning processes to achieve appropriate services and programs for children with disabilities. These activities were conducted as part of the Reach Out - Reach Back efforts of the Utah Parent Center in collaboration with more that 34 community partners (individuals, agencies, and organizations), referring to the responsibility of all members of the community to develop reciprocal relationships to benefit children and youth with disabilities. Approximately 320 parents and professionals in 17 locations have participated in the training thus far. Numerous materials have been developed, translated, acquired, or adapted for use in print and web-based formats.


IOTI- INTERPRETER CERTIFICATION TRAINING

Contact Person: Lee Robinson

Funding Amount: $34,386

Description:
Since 1994, the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind has offered certification assistance to uncertified persons working as sign language interpreters in rural areas statewide. In 1996, USDB received a grant from Utah State University, Interagency Outreach Training Initiative to expand training that would include employees working for other agencies. This expansion provides interpreter training expertise to individuals that otherwise would not have the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills in sign language interpreting. Technology allows USDB to reach individuals statewide. First the Utah Educational Network broadcasts USDB's interpreter training weekly to nine locations. Second, three weekend immersion workshops are presented throughout the year on the campus of USDB in Ogden. Overnight accommodations and meals are available free of charge. Third, a one-week intensive summer camp is offered to prepare participants for the State of Utah's interpreter certification tests. Finally, USDB provides a small reimbursement stipend to individuals taking state certification tests who have participated consistently in year round training. Over the past 8 years, Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind has helped more than 90 individuals pass state certification tests.


IOTI-POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORTS

Contact Person: Sue Behle

Funding Amount: $49,112

Description:
This project provides training to adult service provider groups and family members about the use of positive behavioral supports. The project used a previously developed curriculum to provide systematic training to direct care and supervisory staff who work in community-based and ICF/MR programs. Participants complete field-based assignments on the job or in the home. The curriculum is based upon a model developed at the University of Utah Department of Special Education and then revised and refined to the specific needs of agency providers and parent groups. The curriculum combines the best of positive behavioral approaches including functional assessment and related positive interventions. It is designed to fit into a person-centered approach and encourage self-determination as well as to develop strong protections for the human rights of people with developmental disabilities. One hundred and eighty seven participants have received training.


IOTI- POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORTS FOR PARAPROFESSIONALS

Contact Person: Marilyn Likins

Funding Amount: $37,169

Description:
Special Education and Title I directors, agency directors, and staff across the state continue to identify behavior management and use of positive behavior supports as the #1 training need of paraprofessionals and their supervisors. Due to critical statewide certified/licensed personnel shortages, an increasing number of paraprofessionals are being hired to support instructional services. Through ongoing supervision and feedback, paraprofessionals can learn more effective management strategies resulting in better outcomes for all individuals, especially those with challenging behaviors. This training program utilizes distance learning to provide in-depth training and the availability of support materials that are available on the website to paraprofessionals and their supervisors. The ultimate focus of the training is to enhance the prosocial behaviors of persons with disabilities by increasing the skills of paraprofessionals in the following areas: behavior interventions and strategies, analysis of behavior, legal rights of individuals with disabilities with respect to behavioral interventions and discipline, and dealing with severely challenging and confrontational behaviors. Fifteen (15), two-hour training sessions paired with in-depth lessons and resource materials on the website supply critical information on an as-needed basis to support instructors' efforts in providing the most appropriate positive methods and strategies available to meet the social-behavioral needs of individuals with challenging behaviors. On-site practica experiences give paraprofessionals opportunities to apply, practice, and master the behavioral skills needed to effectively manage and interact with individuals with disabilities in classrooms, residential sites, and work environments. Seventy paraprofessionals, direct care providers, and teachers participated in this training.


IOTI-POSITIVE LEARNING THROUGH ACTIVE INTERACTION (PLAI)

Contact Person: Linda Alsop

Funding Amount: $19,085

Description:
One of the most challenging areas of development for infants and toddlers with multiple disabilities is the development of communication skills. This training is based on the PLAI curriculum developed by Drs. D. Klein, D. Chen, and M. Haney at California State University at Northridge which is based on 3 premises: (1) Responsive interaction with primary caregivers is the most significant factor in a child's early development; (2) a caregiver's ability to accurately observe, interpret, and respond to their child's cues and behaviors will enhance development; and (3) communication skills provide an essential foundation for all learning. Training participants increase their knowledge and skills in promoting interaction between parents and children with multiple disabilities by developing a clear understanding of the infant's existing repertoire of cues and behaviors, understanding the infant's likes and dislikes and current means of communication, increasing the number frequency, and clarity of the infant's communicative behaviors, and strengthening the interactive turn-taking relationship between parents and their infants. Each training participant had the opportunity to implement the PLAI curriculum with at least one target family and receive feedback from course instructors. The PLAI curriculum, viewing guide, and instructional video will be provided to participating early intervention programs. Each training session includes six, two-hour inservice classes taught using the statewide video-conferencing system in a collaborative effort with the Up-to-3 Early Intervention Program at Utah State University. Training was provided to early intervention agencies in Utah, the Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind Parent-Infant Program, and other interested agencies. To date, over 120 early intervention professionals have participated in the training.


IOTI-PREVENTING THE SECOND RAPE

Contact Person: Grace Call Funding Amount: $24,400

Description:
This training is designed to build capacity into the legal system by training service professionals to sensitively and effectively respond to the sexual victimization of people with disabilities.


IOTI-RECRUITING & TEACHING FAMILIES TO SUSTAIN PROACTIVE PARTNERSHIPS AS ADVOCATES

Contact Person: Helen Post

Funding Amount: $30,000

Description:
Staff of the Utah Parent Center and the parent leadership team from the Interagency Coordinating Council provided training to a team of mentor parent leaders. Emphasis was placed on identifying parents from culturally diverse backgrounds. The parent leaders (1) gained knowledge about effective leadership, organizational culture and the unique role that parents play in their child's programs and that will support them in sustaining a peer/ parent group; (2) received training to empower them with skills in communication, problem solving, parents-help-ing-parents, and the issues for families of children with disabilities and special needs; and (3) learned the importance of continuity of support services through developing linkages with Utah Parent Center staff and volunteers statewide, area and state-level family councils, parents working with Allies with Families on the Frontiers project in rural areas, and other parents, organizations, and agencies. Fifteen minority community parent trainers were trained, making a total of 21 available in the state.


IOTI - SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT TRAINING

Contact Person: Becky Taylor

Funding Amount: $107,734

Description:
Paraprofessionals are taught to serve as job coaches in supported employment using a competency-based approach that teaches both knowledge and application of knowledge in the field. Community service organizations refer employees for the training on topics pertinent to experienced job coaches and the consumers they serve. Technical assistance is available to address individual needs. To date, 41 paraprofessionals have completed certification.


INTERDISCIPLINARY TRAINING (IDT)

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: State E & G Funds

Description:
The Interdisciplinary Training (IDT) program provides opportunities for students, from a variety of disciplines, as well as consumers with disabilities, and family members of children with disabilities, to become part of interdisciplinary teams. These teams, with faculty mentors, will provide services and supports to children with disabilities and their families, as well as adults with disabilities. The didactic, clinical, and research components of this program are carefully designed and implemented to enhance the trainees' awareness, knowledge, and skills with the growing trend towards collaborative interdisciplinary efforts in the workplace. There is an increased need for persons who have strong, well-developed interdisciplinary teamwork skills. Additionally, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has extended the need for awareness and knowledge of disability issues to all employers, employees, and to the general public. IDT trainees may participate in the Interdisciplinary Training program at one of three levels: Orientation/Awareness; Intermediate/Skill Development; or Leadership/Specialist/Experiential. Regardless of the level of competency selected, each trainee develops an Individualized Training Plan in consultation with an assigned faculty advisor and the IDT Director. The Individualized Training Plan addresses the IDT Core Competencies and Objectives. To fulfill these competencies, the trainee participates in a series of seminars and selects from a menu of clinical and research experiences. In addition to the broad array of services and settings for children and adults with disabilities, provided by the Center for Persons with Disabilities, community-based programs are also utilized for training purposes. Both graduate and undergraduate students may apply for the IDT program. Stipends may be available for long-term trainees. The IDT program is also available for 1-3 hours of credit (undergraduate and graduate) through the Department of Special Education. The IDT program is also available to consumers with disabilities as well as family members of children with disabilities.


LEISURE AND RECREATION FOR DIFFERENTLY-ABLED KIDS

Contact Person: Sue Olsen

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Governor's Council for People with Disabilities, $25,000

Description:
The project addresses the recreational and leisure activity needs of children with disabilities, ages birth through eight, living in the Cache Valley area (Logan and surrounding communities). City and county administrators have expressed a committed interest and have identified a need for staff training related full inclusion of children and youth with disabilities. Additionally, parents of children and youth with disabilities have participated in focus groups and surveys and have already identified and prioritized recre- ation/leisure activities desired by their children. This project has the capacity of impacting 200 infants and toddlers (ages birth through 3) and 400 children and youth (ages 3 through 8 years of age) with disabilities and their families living in the target communities. The activities impacted the community policymakers responsible for sponsoring activities and the program directors and activity facilitators/ instructors who are responsible for the successful completion of the communities' scheduled recreation and leisure events for young children and youth. Objectives include: (1) Creating an awareness and responsive commitment to the expansion and modification of at least ten priority recre- ation/leisure activities and programs to meet the needs and expectations of children and youth with disabilities; (2) Providing training to approximately 50 administrators, program directors, activity facilitators/instructors (direct service providers), parents, and other appropriate individuals/groups in skills and methodologies to ensure fully inclusive experiences and accessible activities for children and youth with disabilities; (3) Demonstrating initial increased participation of children and youth with disabilities in community recreation/leisure activities and programs of at least ten percent; and (4)Identifying the barriers for participation and access to recreation programs and modifying and implementing at least ten priority recreation/leisure activities desired by children and youth.


MOUNTAIN PLAINS REGIONAL RESOURCE CENTER (MPRRC) REGION 5

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Office of Special Education Programs, $1,587,200

Description:
The MPRRC provides technical assistance to state education agencies in developing quality programs and services for children with disabilities. The MPRRC identifies and analyzes persisting problems that interfere with the provision of special education services. It links state education agencies experiencing similar problems, assists them in developing solutions and supports them in their efforts to adopt new technologies and practices. The MPRRC serves Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Arizona, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.


MULTI-UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Subcontract with University of Utah $41,888

Description:
A critical shortage of public school personnel qualified to serve children with sensory impairments affects Utah and the nation. This project supports personnel who wish to obtain endorsements to teach students with vision impairments and who are ages birth through 21 years. It is a collaborative effort between the University of Utah and Utah State University. To date, six USU students have completed their certification and 18 are currently enrolled. This program successfully utilizes distance learning technology to support students in rural and remote locations. Additional emphasis is placed on recruiting students from diverse cultures and underserved populations. Latino students and several participants from the Navajo tribe are receiving certification in visual impairment.


NEW MEXICO - BUILDING CAPACITY TO IMPROVE SERVICES TO STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: New Mexico Department of Education, $920,160

Description:
This project will benefit the public by building capacity to improve services to students with disabilities. The MPRRC provides technical assistance to the state and local education agencies.


NORTHERN UTAH AREA HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER (NUAHEC)

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Subcontract, Weber State University $64,000

Description:
The NUAHEC is a collaborative endeavor between Utah State University, the Center for Persons with Disabilities, and Weber State University. The purpose of NUAHEC is to (1) provide interdisciplinary practicum/clinical sites for medical students, residents, and an array of allied health professionals; (2) recruit elementary, secondary, and college students into health professions; and (3) retain health care professionals in unserved and underserved medical/health areas. Activities include offering Spanish classes for medical professionals, support of the Hispanic Paraeducator Project, support of the medical home conference, and coordination with school districts to support their summer junior and/or senior high school academic programs.


ON-LINE COURSES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTER STAFF

Contact Person: Jefferson Sheen

Funding Source & Amount: Independent Living Research Utilization $43,252

Description:
The objective of this project is to implement seven asynchronous online courses for the purpose of instructing staff and consumers who are affiliated with Independent Living Centers across the nation. The courses were developed and implemented for the fall and spring of 2003-2004. Three courses were implemented in the fall, with an additional four courses provided during the spring.


POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION AND SUPPORT (PBIS) UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Contact Person: John Copenhaver

Funding Source & Amount: University of Oregon, $50,000

Description:
This project will benefit the public by developing a 'brokerage approach' to technical assistance to support the expanded implementation school-wide PBIS at the state and national levels.


PROVIDING ON-LINE COURSES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING STAFF

Contact Person: Jefferson Sheen

Funding Source & Amount: Fee for Services, $88,020

Description:
The purpose of the on-line courses is to increase the knowledge and skill base of new Centers for Independent Living (CIL) employees in the area of independent living philosophy and service provision. At the completion of the project there will be a total of seven on-line courses that will be designed, developed, and implemented. The courses cover the following topics: -Orientation I: Training for New CIL and Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) -Personnel Ethics and Values-Independent Living Philosophy -Orientation II: Training for New CIL and SILC -Personnel Financial Management for Centers for Independent Living-Getting on Board: Training for Boards of Directors in Independent Living.


PUBLIC HEALTH 101: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH

Contact Person: Curtis Warren

Funding Source & Amount: Department of Health, $15,000

Description:
The CPD and the Department of Health are jointly pursuing the improvement of the Adventures in Public Health computer-based training. The CPD will revise the computer-based training, Adventures in Public Health, to meet ADA compliance and to make changes to the program according to precise specifications. The CPD will update content, document web links from the current compact disk, and verify the links for accuracy. The CPD will also revise print materials including the instructor's manual and produce at final version of the program on compact disk. Each deliverable will be reviewed and approved by Utah Department of Health (UDOH).


REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETER ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (RAS)

Contact Person: John Copenhaver Funding Source & Amount: States and Bureau of Indian Affairs $132,800

Description:
State education departments within and outside the MPRRC region, under the facilitation of the MPRRC, are forming a partnership to develop and implement an educational interpreter assessment system to ensure high standards and quality services for children with severe hearing impairments.


ROCKY MOUNTAIN PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION CONSORTIUM: MCH CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Contact Person: Richard Roberts

Funding Source & Amount: Arizona, $8,000

Description:
This project provides inservice training to public health workers in the four-corners region (Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico) through a certificate program. Dr. Richard Roberts, Director of the Early Intervention Research Institute, teaches a yearly summer seminar for the certificate students and follows their progress through the year.


STRATEGIC PLANNING AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Vocational Rehabilitation, $12,619

Description:
This project is helping the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to revise its strategic plan, and conduct a focus group of consumers as part of a statewide needs assessment. In 2000, Utah vocational rehabilitation (VR) staff engaged in an elaborate strategic planning process to focus the state's efforts to improve VR services. As a result, 11 strategies to effect improvement were identified and committees were established to develop objectives for implementing each strategy. The eleven strategies were: (1) Assure that caseloads are manageable; (2) Improve the quality of communication; (3) Attract, value, and retain quality staff; (4) Assure the provision of quality services and outcomes; (5) Assure a system that guarantees "informed choice" throughout the VR process; (6) Assure that all staff have adequate professional development, training and supervision to successfully perform their job; (7) Develop, promote, and support appropriate community partnerships; (8) Provide leadership in accessibility; (9) Develop cultural competence and respect for diversity; (10) Increase employer awareness of and involvement with the VR programs; and (11) Assist the consumer to understand and access public programs and how employment may affect benefits. To assist the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation staff in implementation, CPD Outreach Division staff devised procedures for revising the strategic plan. Six priorities were identified, including manageable caseloads, quality staff, quality services and outcomes, quality communications, professional development, and community partnerships. A report describing the process and outcomes was submitted to USOR in April, 2004. To assist in continuing needs assessment, CPD Outreach Division staff were asked to facilitate focus groups at sites across the state (Price, Cedar City, Salt Lake City, and Ogden) and to develop a report of results .


THE UTAH TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IMPLEMENTATION GRANT

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Health, $118,760

Description:
This project will benefit the public by planning and conducting an evaluation of the effectiveness and impact of the Utah Traumatic Brain Injury Project, providing onsite leadership and support for three community pilot sites throughout Utah, and developing training materials and modules to be used for targeted audiences in the pilot communities as well as across the state.


UTAH ADA STEERING COMMITTEE

Contact Person: Martin Blair

Funding Source & Amount: Rocky Mountain Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center $50,400

Description:
The Utah ADA Steering Committee was established as a subcontract to the Rocky Mountain Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center to: (a) Organize a Utah Steering Committee for purposes of developing an annual plan and monitoring completion of that plan; (b) Address employer lack of skill and knowledge as it pertains to working with people with disabilities: (c) Provide web-based information for employers and employees; (d) Develop strategies to ensure accessible information technology is available to employers, students, and parents at the primary and second ary levels; (E) ensure that web site accessibility is addressed in institutions of higher education in Utah; (f) Provide information and education regarding accessible education-based information technology to educators statewide; and (g) Conduct outreach through cooperation and participation in conferences targeting people with disabilities, parents, students and professionals who work with people with disabilities.


UTAH LEADERSHIP EDUCATION IN NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES REGIONAL PROGRAM

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Maternal & Child Health Bureau $1,995,000

Description:
In July 2001, a partnership between the University of Utah Medical School and the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) was awarded a five-year grant from the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health: The Utah Regional Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Program (ULEND). This was the only new program funded in the competition, and drew heavily on the CPD's Interdisciplinary Training (IDT) program as a model. It will provide almost $2 million over five years to support interdisciplinary training between the two campuses with trainees in medical, health, and allied health professions. Each year approximately 12-15 long-term ULEND leadership trainees engage in 300 hours of interdisciplinary didactic, clinical, and research activities with emphasis placed on achieving core leadership competencies and objectives. Faculty from Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities as well as the USU Departments of Psychology (Gretchen Gimpel), Nutrition (Nedra Christensen), Audiology, and Speech and Language Pathology (Vicki Simonsmeier) contribute their knowledge and expertise to the ULEND program to enhance the trainees' interdisciplinary experience. To ensure that ULEND trainees strengthen and expand their leadership skills, four distinct and interrelated strands are articulated in the core competencies and objectives. These four strands require leadership trainees to : (1) articulate and apply a family-centered philosophy that guides their practice and refiects their vision and commitment to culturally-compe-tent, community-based services and supports, and coordinated, integrated systems of care that are responsive to both best practices and emerging concerns and priorities in the health care field; (2) expand their core knowledge in the areas of ND/RD, genetics, molecular research, current laws and regulations that impact children and youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their families, the structure of and funding streams for health care and human service systems, the process for advocacy, and the development of public policy; (3) develop enhanced disciplinary skills as well as demonstrable skills in interdisciplinary practice including the provision of clinical services to children and youth with ND/RD and their families, and collaborative interactions with professionals and community service providers; and (4) understand, direct and/or participate in research and evaluation activities that examine the impact of services and service systems from the individual, family, practitioner, community, state, and federal perspectives and will demonstrate the ability to support systems change initiatives.


UTAH LEGISLATIVE COALITION FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

Contact Person: Sarah Rule

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Governor's Council for Persons with Disabilities, $6,129

Description:
The Utah Legislative Coalition for People with Disabilities Project has been supported by many disability organizations in Utah. The Coalition was organized in 1987 to provide leadership, training, coordination, and technical assistance to parents, advocates, and advocacy organizations about disability legislation. This training and technical assistance includes information about the Utah legislative process, how legislation becomes law, and how to work with legislators. The Coalition identifies legislation which will improve services and programs for citizens with disabilities and tracks these bills through the legislative session. Training and technical assistance on legislative issues and state appropriations are also provided to the legislature. Information generated by the various research and demonstration activities of the CPD is used as appropriate by Coalition members and the Utah State Legislature.


UTAH ONE-STOP ENHANCEMENT PROJECT

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Workforce Services $97,452

Description:
This project will develop the Department of Workforce Services One-Stop staff training format, content, and materials. These will build knowledge about individuals with disabilities and significantly increase skill training, career and job development opportunities that result in self-sustaining employment and career advancement for people with disabilities. For core staff training project staff will develop computer based training modules for statewide Department of Workforce Services frontline personnel on disability definitions, laws, etiquette, etc. For enhanced training, project staff will develop advanced training modules to help these personnel to further extend their knowledge, expertise, and skills in serving customers with more complex needs.


WEBAIM K-12: NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON KEEPING WEB ACCESSIBILITY IN MIND IN K-12 EDUCATION

Contact Person: Cyndi Rowland

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs $246,736

Description:
The Internet is one of the most powerful infiuences in our country, our society, and our education system. However, students with disabilities are often denied access to the Internet because of Web sites' designs. Educational materials are placed on the Web with increasing frequency, yet many are placed in inaccessible formats. This includes curricula, assessments, homework, teacher feedback, as well as collaborative work from groups of student peers. Current data suggest this problem is pervasive in the K-12 system. When students with disabilities cannot access curricular elements that are placed on the Web they are, in fact, denied access to the general curriculum. This fiies in the face of legal requirements under IDEA regulations. Most important, these students are denied their independence, dignity, and choice.
To address these issues, changes are needed in the preparation of educators and support personnel (e.g., regular and special educators, instructional technology or curriculum specialists). The next generation of educators is not learning accessibility skills in their required technology courses, perhaps because the faculty that teach them may not possess the subset of design skills necessary to teach accessible Web design. The goal of this three-year project of national significance is to increase the accessibility of Web-based components of the general curriculum for students with disabilities. This will be accomplished in three ways. First, the project staff will develop, implement, and evaluate a model of system-change for the K-12 system. The sets of procedural guidelines will be field-tested across three school districts. Second, project staff will develop, implement, and evaluate an accessibility curriculum to be used in required technology courses during preservice teacher training. The curriculum will be field-tested across four teacher-training programs. Third, an aggressive dissemination campaign will be launched. A Research and Development model will be used throughout the design of this project. To guide its work, the project will rely heavily on data collected in each component, upon the previous accessibility and higher education reform work of the project WebAIM, and upon an advisory panel, who will help in development and review efforts. This panel is comprised of directors of two national centers dealing with accessibility, staff from one of the federal Regional Resource Centers, administrative staff from a school district, a consumer with a disability, and parents of a student with a disability. This panel brings an important knowledge base and perspective to the development of the project.


WORKABILITY UTAH WORK INCENTIVE INITIATIVE-TRAINING (UWIN)

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Department of Health, $251,594

Description:
The Utah Work Incentive Initiative (UWIN) is Utah's response to the 1999 'Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act' (TWIIA). This Act seeks to modernize the employment service system for people with disabilities so that they no longer have to choose between taking a job and having health care. The Utah Work Incentives Coalition (UWIC) was started in the summer of 2000 as the oversight body, with a strong consumer voice, to guide Utah's work incentive projects under TWIIA. The Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University is one of the major participants in UWIC along with several service providers, employment specialists, state agencies, and consumers. Currently, the Interdisciplinary (IDT) Division is involved with the Outreach Training and Awareness Work Group, Employment Supports Work Group, Transition Work Group, Work Incentives Work Group, four of five work groups established by UWIC. As part of the Outreach Training and Awareness Work Group, the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) has been charged with designing and conducting a comprehensive training program to provide agency personnel, consumers, and other interested persons with timely, accurate, and relevant information pertaining to the five major interrelated components of the Work Incen tive Initiatives: Medicaid Buy-In, Expanded Personal Assistance Services, Outreach and Planning, Advocacy and Legal Rights, and Ticket to Work. In addition to ongoing training efforts, CPD staff, through involvement with other UWIN work groups, have been involved in the development of the statewide Employment Related Personal Assistance Services (EPAS) program, a pilot project involving EPAS for individuals with mental illness, and ongoing efforts to develop and maintain a statewide network of Certified Benefits Planners.


DISSEMINATION PROJECTS CPD PUBLICATIONS



CPD PUBLICATIONS

Contact Person: Caryl Blanchard

Funding Source & Amount: CPD*

Description:
The CPD Outreach Division prepares and disseminates, free of charge, two periodic publications of interest to various groups. CPD News offers articles of interest to the professional community. Each issue is disseminated internationally to approximately 2,600 subscribers quarterly. Research of CPD staff is often featured, allowing for quicker dissemination than that offered by most professional publications. Parent News features article3s designed to be helpful to families of children with disabilities with 1,900 issues disseminated four times a year.


FAMILY RESOURCE LIBRARY

Contact Person: Caryl Blanchard

Funding Source & Amount: CPD*

Description:
The CPD Outreach Division prepares and disseminates, free of charge, two periodic publications of interest to various groups. CPD News offers articles of interest to the professional community. Each issue is disseminated internationally to approximately 2,600 subscribers quarterly. Research of CPD staff is often featured, allowing for quicker dissemination than that offered by most professional publications. Parent News features articles designed to be helpful to families of children with disabilities with1,900 issues disseminated four times a year.


FAMILY RESOURCE LIBRARY

Contact Person: Caryl Blanchard

Funding Source & Amount: CPD*

Description:
The Family Resource Library (FRL) contains approximately 2,000 books, educational games, software and videos for families of children with disabilities. The FRL is a lending library with free mailing of materials. Books and ordering information are listed in a catalog available upon request and on the web. Procedural information and technical assistance are available to groups and agencies interested in replicating the library.


IBM ADVANCED WEB ACCESSIBILITY EDUCATION COURSE

Contact Person: Cyndi Rowland

Funding Source & Amount: Fees for Services, $58,464

Description:
IBM solicited a contract with the WebAIM group at the Center for Persons with Disabilities. The focus of six modules will be to create the content for a course designed to teach IBM staff members principles of accessible design. The IBM Global Campus supports 13,000 students worldwide.


LENDLINKS

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: Indiana University, $28,001

Description:
LENDlinks is a partnership between the Riley Child Development Center at Indianapolis, Indiana and the Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University. LENDlinks is funded through the Maternal Child Health Bureau. Its purposes include developing and implementing a web portal, designed for use by LEND programs nationally, to disseminate best practice information about mental health in young children. In addition to the web portal, videoconferences will be available on an annual basis and a DVD will be produced based on the videoconferences.


READING FOR ALL LEARNERS PROGRAM

Contact Person: Alan Hofmeister

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Education, School Districts, Fees for Services, $347,000

Description:
The Reading for All Learners Project continues a ten-year, programmatic, research and dissemination effort to prevent and treat reading failure. The project provides parents, tutors, and teachers with a validated cost-effective instructional program for preventing and treating reading failure. RALP effectively addresses the needs of diverse and at-risk learners, particularly those in poverty-impacted communities. After a review of the research, this program is one of five reading programs approved by the Bureau of Indian Affairs for their federal Reading First projects. Instructional materials and technical assistance are provided to more than 1,200 sites in all states.


REPURPOSING OLMSTEAD TRAINING MATERIALS

Contact Person: Judith Holt

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration, $79,862

Description:
Independent Living Research Utilization and its partners conducted five regional three-day training sessions on Olmstead in 2001-2002. All sessions were videotaped. The objective of this contract is to repurpose these materials to reach a wider audience, especially the Centers for Independent Living, the State Independent Living Centers, and students transitioning from high school. In addition, IL NET has other relevant materials that will be part of the repurposing. The approximate 24 hours of video footage will be edited into a series of 30-45 minute thematic segments. The segments could be augmented using structured questions, guided activities, and discussion points in a trainer's guide and accompanying participant manual. These segments could be packaged as self-paced training modules. Using the exercises and discussion questions in the workbooks and trainer's guide, along with closed-captioned video, an agency or group could use the package to provide training in a series of one hour or 90-minute sessions. The materials will also be available as self-paced learning modules available in print, CD-ROM, or on a website.


STRATEGIES FOR PRESCHOOL INTERVENTION IN EVERYDAY SETTINGS (SPIES)

Contact Person: Sarah Rule

Funding Source & Amount: Fees, $3,650

Description:
Young children with disabilities, special health care needs, and those who are at risk for the development of disability often need supports in order to learn and develop through interactions in everyday settings. Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Setting (SPIES) is a print and video-based curriculum to help adults promote young children's development in everyday settings and during the daily routines and activities that are part of a child's life. The curriculum includes modules that address intervention opportunities, giving help, incidental teaching, intervention for infants, and tracking progress. The strategies addressed have been documented to be effective in developing language and other skills. The curriculum was field tested with personnel in various agencies including Head Start, child care, education, early intervention, and preschool. The curriculum (described at www.cpd.usu/spies) is available in print and captioned video in English and Spanish and a condensed version is available on CD ROM. Data from more than 365 participants indicate that SPIES training results in increased knowledge of intervention techniques. The curriculum has been adapted for family members. SPIES for Parents is available at the website www.spiesforparents.cpd.usu/. Family members' evaluation of the site indicate that it is useful and user-friendly.


K-SAR VIDEO PRODUCTION AND DISTANCE LEARNING

Contact Person: Matt Lovell

Funding Source & Amount: Fees for Services, $260,000

Description:
K-SAR Video/DVD Production Facility is an award-winning, state-of-the-art multimedia production facility located at the CPD. K-SAR has a full-time professional production staff with a variety of technical skills in production, post-production, graphic, Internet web page development, DVD-Video, DVD-ROM, and WebDVD experience.
K-SAR provides a full range of digital broadcast quality services, both in studio and field, using the same state-of-the-art video systems found in television stations and studios. K-SAR combines an experienced staff with professional equipment to provide the educational community with award-win-ning, high quality video and DVD productions. K-SAR has completed numerous projects directly supporting disability research, training, and education.


DIRECT SERVICE PROJECTS



BEAR RIVER ACTIVITY AND SKILL CENTER

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Social Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Private Payments, $254,404

Description:
Bear River Activity & Skill Center (BRASC) provides day training for individuals with relatively severe disabilities. Teaching functional academic, social, daily living, and other skills is emphasized in the day training program. In addition, BRASC offers family support services including respite, latch key, and summer recreation. Supported living services, which help individuals with disabilities to live in their communities, are also offered. Finally, supported employment services, emphasizing community based job development and placement, are offered.
During the July 1, 2003 - May 1, 2004 period, BRASC provided day training for 14 individuals, family support, including summer recreation for 35 families, supported living for 1 individual, and supported employment for 25 individuals. In conjunction with its service programs, BRASC provided employment for 28 students and served as a training site for 16 students participating in the Center for Persons with Disabilities' (CPD) interdisciplinary training program.


CLINICAL SERVICES

Contact Person: Susan Nittrouer

Funding Source & Amount: Fees for Services, $52,761

Description:
Clinical Services staff strives to develop and maintain exemplary service programs for clients to assure that client needs are met in a professional and ethical manner. Clinical Services serves as a clinical training site for USU students and the identified child clinical training practicum site for doctoral level psychology students at USU. The program financially supports two doctoral level psychology students with assistantships for advanced child clinical training. Multidisciplinary assessment/evaluation and treatment services are provided at a reduced cost to children, youth and families, and to adults with suspected learning or attentional problems or developmental disabilities. Referrals come from community agencies, school personnel, physicians, and private individuals. Additionally, Clinical Services staff provide disability evaluations for children and adults referred by Disability Determination Services for residents of the northern region of Utah. Clinical Services staff also provide consultation services to community agencies (i.e., Sunshine Terrace). Staff works cooperatively with other Center divisions and community agencies. During the past year, 209 consumers were served.


CPD FEEDING AND NUTRITION CLINIC

Contact Person: Dennis Odell

Funding Source & Amount: Fees for Services, $850

Description:
Children sometimes have difficulty with sucking, swallowing, biting, or chewing. These problems can seriously affect a child's health. The CPD Divisions of Exemplary Services, Biomedical Services, Interdisciplinary Training, and the Departments of Communicative Disorders, Psychology, Nutrition and Food Science, and Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University have joined to develop and operate an exemplary feeding and nutrition clinic serving children with feeding disorders. The project objectives include: (a) developing intake and clinical service protocols; (b) developing and implementing a fee-for-service structure that is consistent with public and private insurance criteria; (c) developing relationships with pediatric health care providers throughout Utah and the intermountain region, in order to generate a greater consumer base for feeding and nutrition clinic services. (i.e., promotion and marketing of the service); and (d) evaluating the clinic services and individual outcomes, and making necessary revisions to ensure its future viability. During the past year, 19 children were served through the clinic.


MEDICAL/ADHD CLINIC

Contact Person: Dennis Odell

Funding Source & Amount: Fees for Services, $68,596

Description:
This clinic serves children and adults with a wide spectrum of developmental disabilities and related health problems such as autism, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), and learning disabilities. Services are provided to consumers primarily in northern Utah and surrounding areas. Medical evaluation and treatment is provided through this clinic. During the past year 435 consumers were provided with services.


SPECIALTY CLINICS

Contact Person: Dennis Odell

Funding Source & Amount: Not Applicable

Description:
Specialty clinics in developmental disabilities and neurology are held at the CPD periodically through Utah Children's Special Health Services. In addition, referrals can be made to other specialty clinics held in other parts of the state by CSHS. During the past year, 57 clients were treated.


TELEWORK

Contact Person: Marilyn Hammond

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, $862,074

Description:
People with disabilities continue to experience difficulty obtaining and maintaining employment. Barriers may include lack of transportation, inaccessible community and work environments, fatigue, health issues, and the need for personal assistance. These barriers may be reduced or eliminated through the availability of telework- work that may occur outside of the usual employment site and in which communications take place in an alternative mode-usually electronically. This telework program fund will provide individuals with disabilities with an alternative mechanism to access computers and other needed equipment not provided by employers or other systems to enable them to establish telework and other alternative work environments. The goals of this telework fund program are to: (a) increase access to technology for individuals with disabilities through the provision of no/low interest loans to purchase computers and other equipment, including adaptive equipment, so that individuals with disabilities can telework from home and other remote sites, (b) increase employment opportunities and competitive employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.


UP-TO-3 EARLY INTERVENTION

Contact Person: Sue Olsen

Funding Source & Amount: Utah Department of Health, $950,694

Description:
Up-To-3 is one of 15 Early Intervention Programs in Utah, contracted with the Utah Department of Health, which is Utah's designated lead agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), Part C. The Up-To-3 program provides services to families with infants or toddlers, under the age of 3, with developmental delays, disabilities, or diagnosed conditions with a high probability of resulting developmental delays. Services from the Up-To-3 program are available in Rich, Box Elder, and Cache Counties. The mission of the Up-To-3 program is to enhance the family's capabilities and self-confidence to nurture their child's growth and development. Program staff implement family-centered practices which supports the philosophy that a family's concerns, values, priorities, and resources should establish the framework of services provided for their child and family. This process results in the development of an Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP). The Up-To-3 program was awarded the 2004 ACRES (American Council on Rural Special Education) Exemplary Program Award. Up-To-3 staff were also recognized by the Utah State University Social Work Program for outstanding contributions to their Practicum Program.


UTAH ALTERNATIVE FINANCING PROGRAM

Contact Person: Marilyn Hammond

Funding Source & Amount: National Institute on Disability & Martin Blair Rehabilitation Research/Private Donations, $254,196

Description:
The Utah Assistive Technology Alternative Financing Program is a collaborative effort between the Utah Assistive Technology Program, the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation and Zions Bank. This innovative program provides administrative support, conducts statewide outreach and public awareness activities targeted to rural and underrepresented populations in Utah, and provides comprehensive consumer outcome evaluations for the nonprofit Utah Assistive Technology Foundation. Through Zions Bank, the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation provides low-interest loans for Utahns with disabilities so they can purchase technologies that enhance and improve independence in home, community and work settings.
Over the years, the UATF has been able to help hundreds of Utahns with disabilities of all ages obtain loans and grants to purchase the assistive technology that allows them to be independent, productive and successful at home, at school, at work and in the community. During this past year, the Foundation assisted 296 individuals in acquiring $1,297,005 in consumer loans for assistive and adaptive technology. Technologies covered by this program range from hearing aids to adapted vans/vehicles. The Foundation provided $80,365 in loan buy-down funds to Zions Bank. The Utah Assistive Technology Foundation is the most productive program of its kind in the United States.


UTAH ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

Contact Person: Martin Blair

Funding Source & Amount: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation, $415,276

Description:
The UATP provides information, training, technical assistance and support to the nearly 200,000 Utahns with disabilities, their family members and service providers. This is accomplished through statewide public awareness; interagency coordination and policy development; training and technical assistance to targeted populations including the aging, early intervention providers, and school personnel; alternative state financing through support of the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation; equipment demonstration through local centers for independent living, a fully equipped AT development and fabrication laboratory, and through direct contact with consumers; technology-related information through support of the statewide information and referral service, Access Utah Network, which also operates a statewide AT sales bank of used equipment; interstate activities through col laboration with Arizona and Colorado in addressing needs of Native Americans; and, partnerships and cooperative initiatives between public and private sector to promote greater participation by business and industry in the development, demonstration, and provision of AT devices and services. During this past fiscal year, UATP provided technical assistance to 1,834 individuals. Thirty-six public forums were held that reached approximately 6,000 people. Forty-five 45 presentations were seen by over1,200 individuals and 925 people attended 22 training sessions. Over 1,600 individuals participated in device demonstration activities.


RESEARCH PROJECTS



AN OUTCOMES-BASED APPROACH TO EVALUATING PART C SERVICE COORDINATION MODELS

Contact Person: Richard Roberts

Funding Source: Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, $179,998

Description:
The goal of this three-year study is to identify those service coordination strategies that best support service system efficiency and child and family quality of life. It will investigate current Part C coordination models particularly in terms of child and family outcomes as well as costs associated with different models. Three service coordination models will be evaluated, drawn from six communities. Two hundred and ten children ages birth to 3 years with disabilities and their families will be recruited. The models include: (1) an 'independent' model; (2) a 'com-bined-roles' model; and (3) a 'one-stop shopping' model. A variety of qualitative and quantitative methodologies will be used. Primary outcomes and products from this study will be: (1) an analysis and critique of each model in relation to child and family outcomes; (2) data to inform the government on achievement related to OSERS' GPRA outcomes for Part C; (3) a determination of costs in service coordination and direct service outcomes; and (4) a framework to guide future outcomes-based evaluations of service coordination. To date, data have been collected for the first two cohort. Presentations presenting preliminary information have been made to state and national groups.


BILINGUAL EARLY LANGUAGE AND LITERACY SUPPORT

Contact Person: Mark Innocenti

Funding Source: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, $480,794

Description:
The Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support (BELLS) project is funded by the National Institutes of Health and OERI to test the language and emergent literacy outcomes of Spanish-speaking/bilingual children who either are enrolled in an early childhood program that includes English exposure/immersion, a quality literacy/language preschool environment, and home language and literacy support or are in a community where limited early childhood experiences are available. The BELLS project begins its fifth of five funding years in June 2004. For BELLS enrolled children and families, assessment occurs at 18, 24, 36, and 48 months of age and prior to kindergarten entry. Supplemental funding has been obtained to assess some children in kindergarten and first grade. Assessment consists of measures of child and mother language skills, parent support of literacy experiences, maternal language facilitation, language/literacy aspects of the home environment, child literacy skills, and quality of childcare/preschool settings. This will result in rich, longitudinal database on the language and literacy environments of the child. A number of research questions have been identified that will provide information important to the field regarding the language and literacy experience of low-income Spanish speaking children and the specific effects of an extensive early childhood intervention. The research objectives are: (1) Does early English exposure/immersion of infants from Spanish-speaking families, beginning at ages 1, 2, or 3, facilitate later English language and emergent literacy skillsfi (2) Does an enriched home language & literacy environment, whether in English or Spanish, facilitate language and emergent literacy skills in relation to early English immersionfi (3) Do specific intervention strategies, focused on language and emergent literacy, which are individualized and developmentally appropriate in naturalistic contexts improve the acquisition of language and emergent literacy in both English and the home languagefi and (4) Are these relations moderated by other factors such as: child factors (age, developmental level, gender), parent factors (language, literacy, educational values, responsiveness), family factors (socioeconomic status, family size), and social factors (cultural and ethnic identity, immigrant and generational status)fi In the past, BELLS staff submitted two articles to refereed journals and another is in preparation. These address parent child activities, validity of vocabulary measures, and outcomes of the home visiting model.


BOTTOM-UP MODELLING OF MASS PEDESTRIAN FLOWS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EFFECTIVE EGRESS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Contact Person: Keith Christensen

Funding Source: Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation, $150,000

Description:
The purpose of this research project is to improve the exit of individuals with disabilities from buildings and other settings in emergencies. To accomplish the purpose, this research project will gain a sound understanding ofs (a) the effect of the current and proposed Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) for the built-environment on the egress of individuals with disabilities during the mass pedestrian fiows (MPFs) triggered by health-safety events and (b) the effect of security-oriented design methods on the egress of individuals with disabilities during health-safety event triggered MPFs. The goal of this research project is to validate two hypotheses and make recommendations for improved design methods and standards for the built-environment. The hypotheses are (a) that current and proposed ADAAG standards for the egress of individuals with disabilities during health-safety events are ineffective as a result of the mass pedestrian fiows triggered by the event, and (b) that secu-rity-oriented design standards adversely affect the egress of individuals with disabilities during health-safety events. The objective of the project is to measure the emergent behaviors of the diverse sample populations of six representative built-en-vironments (an airport, high school, conference center, multi-story office building, federal development, and secured federal development) during simulated health-safety events. An intervention (modification of the design character of the built-environment) will be applied to eliminate conditions occurring during MPFs which adversely effect the egress of individuals with disabilities. To achieve the goals and objectives of this research project an innovative and proven method, Agent-Based Modeling, will be used to simulate MPFs in the built-environment triggered by health-safety events. Agent-Based Modeling allows for realistic computer simulation of complex adaptive systems (such as MPFs) from the bottom up, by modeling individual behaviors of autonomous agents in a simulated environment and allowing macroscopic patterns in behavior to emerge. A few of the outcomes of this research project which will contribute greatly to the current body of knowledge are: (a) an evaluation of the effectiveness of current design standards, (b) an understanding of the emergent behaviors of MPFs, (c) the effect of those behaviors on the emergency egress of individuals with disabilities, (d) the conditions in the built-environment that effect the emergent behaviors, and (e) responsive design standards. The outcomes of this research project have direct and meaningful application. The bodies responsible for determining appropriate design standards, which effect individuals with disabilities, are supportive and interested in the project outcomes. Further, the practitioners responsible for the implementation of design standards and methods will benefit from more informed practices and appropriate recommendations. These two groups will be targeted for dissemination through related scholarly and trade literature, professional conference presentations, and the publication of design recommendations to improve the exit of individuals with disabilities from buildings and other settings in emergencies.


CONTINUING FOLLOW-UP OF UTAH STUDENTS EXITING SPECIAL EDUCATION

Contact Person: Richard Baer

Funding Source: Utah Department of Education, $39,936

Description:
In 1992, Utah State University's (USU) Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) cooperated with the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) to conduct a survey of students exiting special education in 1990-91. The study sought information on former students' employment and job training experiences while in school, their residential arrangements, employment, continuing education, community activities, access of social services, and arrest records. The original study was replicated in 1998-99 for students exiting special education in 1996-97. In general, the data showed a disturbing yet improving picture. For example, drop out rates decreased by four percent, but were still 29 percent of all those exiting special education; employment rates improved by eight percent, but unemployment was still 32 percent; and students living with their parents increased by 14 percent, but 20 percent more were pursuing continuing education. The present project is building on the previous tw, and is surveying students exiting special education in 2001-02. Comparison with the data from the two previous cohorts will allow determination of whether and in what respects life continues to improve for students exiting special education in Utah. Further, individuals in the cohort exiting in 1996-97 will be surveyed again to determine if their lives are improving over time. A report on the survey of the 1996-97 cohort was completed and a report on the survey of the 2001-02 cohort is near completion.


COST OF EHDI PROGRAMS

Contact Person: Linda Goetze

Funding Source: Center for Disease Control, Utah Department of Health, $64,874

Description:
Recent efforts associated with newborn hearing screening have been directed towards establishing programs that will identify the approximately 12,000 infants in the U.S. born each year with a hearing loss. Because attention has focused on the implementation of newborn hearing screening, few studies have been undertaken to determine the financial costs of early detection and intervention programs (EHDI). Determining the costs of EHDI programs will assist public health agencies in deciding how to best implement a hearing screening program. The purpose of this study is conducting a complete state-of-the-art economic analysis of the screening, follow-up, and diagnostic components of eight Utah hospital-based EHDI programs. Preliminary findings suggest that the screening cost per baby is significantly higher in rural hospitals compared with screening in urban hospitals. All families reported that they were quite satisfied with the screening process and supports. Also, results from the family survey suggest that parent anxiety is higher and satisfaction is lower for families of infants diagnosed with a hearing loss when compared with families who experienced screening and/or diagnostic services but whose babies were not diagnosed with a hearing loss. This finding suggests that the negative effects of false positive screening results is minimal.


EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN WITH HEARING LOSS

Contact Person: Susan Nittrouer

Funding Source: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health & Human Development $353,493

Description:
The long-term goal of this project is to understand how age of identification (before 6 months, between 12 and 18 months, or between 24 and 30 months) and communication mode (spoken-only or sign-supplemented) affect spoken language, cognitive, and psychosocial development in young children with hearing loss . The coincidental advent of effective procedures for diagnosing hearing loss in newborns and of cochlear implants has spurred the general perspective that virtually all children with hearing loss can develop good spoken language, there is disagreement on how best to facilitate that development, or if there is a "cost" to cognitive and/or psychosocial development imposed by early diagnosis or intervention. To advance our knowledge concerning these issues, 25 children in each of six cells (crossing three ages of identification and two communication modes) as well as 50 children with normal hearing will participate in five to eight test sessions, depending on age of identification. Materials collected will include samples of parent-child interactions, standard language and cognitive measures, and responses to parental questionnaires. The kinds of data derived from these materials will be new to the study of hearing loss, but will refiect current methods used in the study of children with normal hearing, and will include measures of speech acoustics, vocabulary, syntax, discourse, nonverbal cognitive abilities, psychosocial development, and parental stress. Results will help the community of professionals serving children with hearing loss in designing intervention programs and in selecting tools to evaluate progress.


EFFECTS OF INFANT MASSAGE IN HAITIAN ORPHANAGES

Contact Person: Vonda Jump

Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
A growing number of infants in developing countries are destined to spend their first months and often years in orphanage environments. The future of these vulnerable infants is potentially compromised, as many orphanages provide less than optimal and often suboptimal conditions. (However, many infants and young children recover quickly when placed in more optimal environments). Not surprisingly, research has shown that infants in orphanages with little physical contact experience issues ranging from attachment difficulties to severe behavioral and cognitive deficits, even after adoptions into families.
Many children in orphanages lack critical behaviors for engaging others such as smiling, making eye contact, and crying. A lack of such behaviors may place these children at risk for atypical interactions with others and decrease their ability to effectively engage others in the future. Massage has been shown to improve these important behaviors in other infants. Furthermore, infants in orphanages have been shown to experience growth delays, partially as a result of decreased social interactions. These infants also typically have smaller head circumferences than their non-institutionalized peers, a measurement which is often assumed to be a refiection of brain growth. Massage has been found to facilitate growth in the short-term, and the effects of a short-term massage intervention by NICU nurses have been shown to be long lasting. Some research indicates that infants in orphanages experience high levels of stress. Massage has been shown to decrease cortisol and to decrease catecholamine levels, indicating decreased stress in compromised infants.
The purpose of this project is to develop a relationship with staff in Haitian orphanages and to implement an infant massage intervention in the orphanage environment. The goals of the proposed project are to better understand the effects of touch deprivation in humans and to assess whether a simplistic intervention, infant massage, can ameliorate these negative effects. This project is innovative in that it attempts to implement a cost-effective, hands-on intervention with orphanage staff to increase the health and well-being, as well as ability of infants in the orphanage to interact. Infants in the massage group are expected to experience decreased cortisol levels, less illness, gain more weight, and to increase their ability to interact with others compared to infants in the control group.


INREACH TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

Contact Person: Glenna Boyce

Funding Source: Department of Education, Office of Special Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, $210,315

Description:
The InReach Technology Evaluation Project staff has collaboratively developed with NICU and Part C staff an innovative process designed to support infants eligible for Part C services and their families as they transition to home and Part C services. The technologies developed to allow this supportive transition for families, whose homes are often many miles from the NICU, include: (1) Desktop conferencing for the IFSP Care Conference, (linking parents, NICU and Part C staff before the infant is discharged to set developmental goals); (2) An instructional DVD that explains the InReach procedures to parents and staff; and (3)A website (www.In-Reach. org) that provides state and national resources and allows parents to post their infant's picture for family and friends to view with password protection. The present project, using a comparison group design, is evaluating the effectiveness of the technologies and InReach procedures. Measures include interviews with NICU and Part C staff and parents, activity time diaries for NICU and Part C staff, resource cost comparisons, DVD and web-site evaluations. The purposes of the present evaluation is to discover the effectiveness of the desktop technology in conducting the IFSP, and whether the InReach procedures are cost effective.


MEASURING AND MONITORING COMMUNITY-BASED INTEGRATED SYSTEMS OF CARE

Contact Person: Richard Roberts

Funding Source: Maternal & Child Health Bureau, $144,899

Description:
The purpose of this project was to develop and implement a national strategy for monitoring and reporting progress toward Healthy People 2010's performance outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). All CSHCN will receive coordinated ongoing comprehensive care within a medical home. All families of CSHCN will have adequate private and/or public insurance to pay for the services they need. All children will be screened early and continuously for special health care needs. Services for CSHCN and their families will be organized in ways that families can use them easily. Families of CSHCN will partner in decision making at all levels, and will be satisfied with the services they receive. All youth with SHCN will receive the services necessary to make appropriate transitions to adult health care, work, and independence. The results from this project consisted of the following: (1) A set of indicators was developed to help states measure their progress in achieving these outcomes; (2) Various measurement tools and strategies were identified by states to provided the needed data; and (3)Dissemination of the project occurred via various presentations and publications.


SYSTEM FOR ASSISTED NAVIGATION IN DYNAMIC AND COMPLEX ENVIRONMENTS

Contact Person: Martin Blair

Funding Source: Community-University Research Initiative, $23,000

Description:
SANDEE is a research project designed to provide continuous universal access to indoor environments through distributed tracking and guidance. Users interact with the system through voice-based natural language interfaces realized through small wearable or handheld toolkits. The system also manages a fieet of small mobile robotic guides for individuals who prefer to be physically led rather than follow verbal direction. The one year project is meeting the following objectives: 1. Develop and evaluate software and hardware architectures for distributed tracking and guidance. 2. Develop and evaluate software tools for automating the design and implementation of distributed tracking and guidance systems. 3. Involve individuals with disabilities in all key design decisions. 4. Develop and evaluate voice-based conversational natural language interfaces to distributed tracking and guidance systems. 5. Investigate the use of radio frequency identification for context-aware indoor tracking and guidance. 6. Develop and evaluate distributed scheduling algorithms for managing dynamic heterogeneous resources, such as mobile robots and wearable toolkits. 7. Engineer and evaluate wearable toolkits through which individuals with disabilities can interact with distributed tracking and guidance systems. 8. Conduct extensive evaluations of large distributed tracking and guidance systems in two real life indoor environments. (See http://kulyukin2k.cs.usu. edu:8001/vkweb/research/sandee.html for more information). The project team is composed of computer scientists, electrical engineers, and consultants who are persons with disabilities who will benefit from this technology at the Assistive Technology Laboratory. This objectives of this project were met and the research team was awarded a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to continue development and engineering efforts. Activities under the NSF grant will commence in fall 2004.


THE ONTOGENY OF SEGMENTAL SPEECH ORGANIZATION

Contact Person: Susan Nittrouer

Funding Source: National Institute on Deafness & Other Communicative Disorders, $212,720

Description:
This research is concerned with the development of phonological abilities in normal children and with what goes wrong in this process for children at risk for language problems. One area of interest is how normal children learn to extract phonemes from a complex acoustic signal that lacks explicit invariant information about those phonemes. Another area of interest is how the development of phonological knowledge is affected by conditions that put children at risk for language problems. Learning to recognize phonological structure in the acoustic speech signal is necessary for many other kinds of language skills, such as reading. Because children with even mild hearing losses or children growing up in poverty seem to have some language delay, it may be that a child's ability to discover the phonological structure of language is in turn dependent on such language experience. A long-term goal for this laboratory is to investigate what has gone wrong in the development of phonological knowledge in children who encounter difficulty learning language.


UTAH EARLY COLLABORATIVE MEDICAL HOME PROJECT EVALUATION

Contact Person: Richard Roberts

Funding Source: Utah Department of Health Diane Behl $75,000

Description:
The goal of the Utah Collaborative Medical Home Project was to develop and implement a statewide system to support medical homes for children with special health care needs in primary care settings, emphasizing the provision of comprehensive, continuous, coordinated, culturally responsive, and family centered care. The CPD's role was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medical home project in terms of improving services for children and families, increasing knowledge of pediatric practices in implementing medical home, and systems change efforts to ensure sustaining medical home practices. The results of the evaluation demonstrated that families reported high level of satisfaction and support from the medical home practices.


UTAH EARLY INTERVENTION PROJECT FOLLOW-UP

Contact Person: Mark Innocenti

Funding Source: Utah Dept. of Education $150,000

Description:
The Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP) was originally funded in 1996 through the Utah Departments of Education and Health, as a three-year multi-method, longitudinal study of the effects of early intervention for high-risk and developmentally disabled young children birth through five. Following completion of the original study, the Utah State Office of Education funded a follow-up study to continue to track children enrolled in the original study as they progressed through their academic career. This follow-up evaluation is currently in its seventh year. Children have been followed for a nine to ten year period. Funding for this project occurs on a year-to-year basis. This evaluation is participatory in nature in that evaluation and State Office of Education staff collaborate to determine specific questions to be addressed each year.
This fiscal year marked a significant change in the structure of this project. This will be the final year of following the children being followed longitudinally. State end of year tests will be obtained for these children to examine their proficiency at this time. These data will be examined in relation to earlier data collected. A cost study of eight school districts will also be collected. This cost study will examine variations in preschool service patterns and identify district level direct and indirect costs.
This study begins activities toward a new study called The Utah Cost, Quality and Outcomes Project. This new study will look at the variables of individual child costs for services, quality of services provided, and progress made by children on outcome measures.


UTAH FRONTIERS PROJECT: A SYSTEM OF CARE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH SERIOUS EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCES

Contact Person: Glenna Boyce

Funding Source: Utah Department of Mental Health, $290,540

Description:
The Utah State Division of Mental Health, with regional mental health divisions, is conducting a nationally funded project, the Utah Frontiers Project, to improve community-based mental health services for children with serious emotional disturbances and their families in rural, frontier areas of the state. Kane, Garfield, and Beaver counties were the first project area (Cohort 1) in the state: Carbon, Emery, and Grand counties (Cohort 2) are also participating. This six year project started in October 1, 1998; it is one of approximately 61 projects across the nation funded by Child, Adolescent and Family Branch of the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS). A national evaluation of the projects has been mandated by Congress to learn how the projects are developed and how they help children and families. Glenna C. Boyce and James F. Akers at the Early Intervention Research Institute at Utah State University are conducting the Utah Frontiers evaluation in conjunction with Sherilin Rowley (representing families) from Liaisons (LINCS). The goals of the study are to keep children at home, in school, and out of trouble in the community. The Utah evaluation involves four components: (1) A cross-sectional descriptive study; (2) A child and family outcome study; (3) System-level assessment; and (4) A services and cost study. Findings from the longitudinal outcomes study (collected from clinicians, caregivers and youth) indicate that youth functional problems and symptoms have decreased. Caregiver strain has also decreased. Data collection ends August 31, 2004. The final report will be completed by December, 2004.


WORKABILITY UTAH WORK INCENTIVE INITIATIVE-EVALUATION (UWIN-EVAL)

Contact Person: Jeff Sheen

Funding Source: Utah Department of Health , $77,210

Description:
The Utah Work Incentive Initiative (UWIN) Evaluation effort is designed to conduct ongoing comprehensive process and outcome evaluations for all UWIN grant activities and programs. UWIN evaluators utilize a Participatory Action Research Model (PAR) for all UWIN evaluation projects.

Project Directory

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