Center for Persons with Disabilities in conjunction
with Utah State University

It is our vision
that ind
ividuals and their family members exercise independence and self-determination across their lifespans as communities support full participation and informed choices.





  Table of Contents

Accomplishments
Advisory Council
Council on Consumer Affairs
Directors
Organizational Chart
Awards & Appointments
Fiscal Information
Proposals Submitted
Courses & Practica
Training, Technical Assistance & Consultation
Publications & Products
Student Support
Consumer Services
National/International Presentations
Project Directory
Project Descriptions



Accomplishments               Dr. Sarah Rule, CPD Director

"Education is learning what you didn't even know you didn't know."
-Elmer G. Letterman


Educational opportunities--many expected, some not--flourished this yiar in the Center for Persons with Disabilities. Studens, Center staff, consumers, and their families embraced opportunities as we initiated new projects and programs, addressed fiscal challenges, and worked in a cli mate of changing policy. Together we learned there was always more we needed to know to address issues of disability.

Learning with students. University students infused talent and energy into virtually every CPD project and program. The CPD expended nearly $400,000 in assistantships, wages, and stipends. The return on this investmentthe participation of more than 140 students was gratifying. Students said their CPD mentors were instrumental in their education at USU and in discovering issues of disability within their fields.

Students honed critical professional skills in decision making, information analysis and reporting. They learned to be team members with faculty, staff, consumers and their families, and students from many other disciplines. The Bear River Activity & Skill Center employed 51 students from eight disciplines. The Exemplary Services Division offered unique research experiences in the ontogeny of speech development to students from related fields such as communicative disorders and also from engineering. Clinical Services program staff mentored 25 psychology students who served more than 209 individuals with disabilities and their family members. Students participated in service delivery and evaluation in the Up-to-3 program's early intervention and community-based programs (Wee Wonders and Musikgarten).

Students' learning opportunities also included technology research. The WebAIM project made distance education accessible to individuals with disabilities who use the World Wide Web. The SPIES (Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Settings) project investigated the usability of web sites as educational tools for families of children with disabilities.

Students shared their knowledge in journal articles, professional presentations, and face-to-face and on-line workshops. They presented work that ranged from reading supports for families of the White Mountain Apache Reservation to research on benefits of home visiting for early literacy development in children for whom English is a second language.

Learning with individuals who have disabilities and family members. Several new initiatives taught us how to expand supports for rural residents and also how to improve service systems:

· Feeding clinicThis interdisciplinary team-based effort involved specialists from the CPD, other University departments, 20 USU students, and community agencies. In this first year, clinic staff and students helped 33 families in rural northern Utah whose children experienced critical, though low incidence, feeding and nutritional challenges.

· ASSERTAutism Supports: Services, Research, and Training was a joint initiative of the Department of Special Education & Rehabilitation and the CPD. Its goals are to (a) augment school-based services for preschoolers with autism, (b) prepare personnel from several disciplines, and (c) serve as a research setting. Ten students worked to prepare children for successful school inclusion. Community advisors included families, agency personnel, and faculty from various USU departments.

· Medical home initiativePartnering with Intermountain Health Care corporation staff and 40 families, CPD personnel worked to assure that families of individuals with disabilities could receive information and access an array of supports through their primary care physicians. This initiative is expected to have continuing impact as part of larger state and national efforts.

· E-newsLed by vice chair of the Council on Consumer Affairs Jane Neilsen, consumers developed a new tool to share informationan electronic newsletter to reach individuals with disabilities statewide.

Learning with partner agencies and organizations. The CPD bridged preservice and lifelong career education. Staff provided 11,609 hours of community-based training and technical assistance to 50,043 participants. The Interagency Outreach Training Initiative supported training for more than 3,400 agency staff members, individuals with disabilities and family members. Partnership examples were:

· The Transition Outcomes Project of the Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC) assisted over 1000 school districts in 22 states. Its goal is to increase graduation rates for students with disabilities in compliance with the No Child Left Behind legislation. Its model identifies strategies to help local school districts to comply with the secondary transition service requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

· Illustrating collaboration at its best, the MPRRC fostered the Regional Assessment System (RAS) for K-12 Interpreters, with funding from the Office of Special Education, U.S. Department of Education and a partnership of 11 Western States, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Nebraska Boy's Town National Research Hospital, and Johnson County (Kansas) Community College. In order to help educational interpreters (for students who are deaf or hard of hearing) evaluate their skills, the RAS administers assessments and makes individual recommendations to each interpreter. It also makes recommendations to help each state's education agency assist its school districts in improving interpreters' skills and knowledge.

· The Early Intervention Research Institute's continued national leadership promoted systemic change through participatory action research. EIRI also disseminated research results to inform policy and practice. As examples, The Utah Early Intervention Project analyzed the long-term effects of proposed changes in requirements for participation in early intervention services. The Utah Frontiers Project demonstrated that rural Utah could develop comprehensive fiscally sustainable services for 210 families and their children with serious emotional disturbance. These rely on collaboration between communities, agencies, and families.

· With support from the Governor's Council for People with Disabilities, Interdisciplinary Training Division staff worked with city parks and recreation personnel to make leisure activities available to people with disabilities. The Division gave 30 students from various disciplines and community membersincluding individuals with disabilities and familiesthe opportunity to partner in participatory action research geared to improvement of services and supports. Partnering agencies, such as Sunshine Terrace, offer supports across the lifespan.

· With the Box Elder and Cache School Districts, Interdisciplinary Training Division staff taught 23 Spanish-speaking high school students and adults to tutor migrant children to improve their reading skills. Partnering with the Area Health Education Center, CPD staff introduced health-related career opportunities to 796 elementary students.

With the gracious support of the Janet Quinney Lawson Foundation and the College of Natural Resources, the Assistive Technology Fabrication Laboratory moved to remodeled quarters. Here students learn to develop and provide assistive technology fostering independence in activities of individuals' choice. Nearly 200 students and community members used the new lab in May and June of 2003.

The Outreach Division and staff members in Brigham City led the transition of adult supports from a university- based program to a community nonprofit corporation. The CPD is grateful to Michelle Wilson and the capable and dedicated staff who now provide employment and day supports at the Lifeskills and Individual Needs Center.

Finally, the community's response to the Angel's Landing playground project taught us about generosity and reminded us what the CPD is about. In a time of economic challenges, CPD staff, students, community residents, businesses, and organizations donated money and countless hours to this effort. Angel's Landing has nearly reached its financial goal to build an environment where children will teach usif we sometimes forget that with the right supports, everybody can play together.



two graduates swap high fives from their wheelchairs

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Advisory Council


Beth Skidmore: Thanks for a Job Well Done

FEW PEOPLE HAVE DEVOTED MORE years of service to their community than Beth Stoddard Skidmore. This year, Skidmore retired from the Advisory Board for the Center for Persons with Disabilities after serving continuously since her first appointment in l986.

Skidmore has spent her life living in Richmond, Utah where she and her husband raised five children. She served Cache Valley and northern Utah in a variety of capacities. She received her Social Work degree from Utah State University with a minor in Public Health. Her employment with the State of Utah began in l964, and in l974, Skidmore was appointed by the State Division of Services to the Handicapped to represent Northern Utah Handicapped Services. She was instrumental in initiating the service programs of the Center for Persons with Disabilities by referring and advocating for families, advising program development, and representing the State for many years on the Advisory Board. Skidmore has always been dedicated to children, particularly those with challenges. This assignment prepared her and her family for their own personal challenge when her oldest daughter became paraplegic in an auto accident.

In 1999, after 35 years, Skidmore retired from state employment as supervisor for child protection services in the Bear River area. She still serves as the Justice Court Judge in Richmond, an appointment she has held for l6 years. Even after retirement, Skidmore continues to serve the Department of Human Services, Office of Licensing, completing foster and adoptive home studies. During her 35 years of professional service, Skidmore has accumulated many awards and recognitions, including Outstanding Public Employee for the State of Utah, the Earl Conder Award for Outstanding Public Service, District 3 House of Representatives Outstanding Public Employee, and Outstanding Supervisor of the Year Award for the Northern Utah Region.

Throughout Skidmore's terms as a member of the Advisory Board for the Center for Persons with Disabilities, she has provided quiet, but solid input and suggestions, helping the CPD maintain close relationships with the state service agencies, families of people with disabilities, and other community organizations.

At this time it is particularly fitting that a special tribute be paid to Skidmore for the many years of quality service she has provided. Thus, it is a great honor to dedicate this issue of the Annual Report of the Center for Persons with Disabilities to Beth Stoddard Skidmore in recognition of her contributions to the CPD, the people the Center serves, and our many students who receive training and experience in helping people with disabilities.




UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVES
Gerry R. Giordano, Chair
, Dean, College of Education & Human Services, Utah State University

Brent Miller, Vice President for Research, Utah State University

David Stein, Department Head, Psychology, COEHS, Utah State University

Charles Salzberg, Department Head/Professor, Special Education, COEHS, Utah State University

James Blair, Department Head, Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, COEHS, Utah State University

STATE SERVICE AGENCY REPRESENTATIVES
Fraser Nelson
, Executive Director, Disability Law Center

Alison Lozano, Executive Director, Governor's Council for People with Disabilities

Deb Odell, Director, Northern Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah Dept. of Human Services

Kirk Allen , Director, Special Education, Logan City School District

CONSUMER AND FAMILY REPRESENTATIVES
Gordon Richins Jane Nielsen Blake Savage

Don Uchida Helen Post Laurie Ballam
Marsha Rawlins Vickie Brenchley Beth Skidmore

Margene Bolingbroke Matt Maw



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Council on Consumer Affairs

PRIMARY CONSUMER REPRESENTATIVES
Lynne Krumm
Ron Mecham
Jane Nielsen, Vice Chair
Helen Roth
Bill Salerno
Blake Savage, Chair


PARENT/FAMILY REPRESENTATIVES
Sandra Anderson
Margene Bolingbroke
Gilbert Duncan
Marsha Rawlins


STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
Matt Maw

EX OFFICIO
Gordon Richins, Consumer Liaison
Cyndi Rowland, CPD Associate Director
Sarah Rule, CPD Director

DIVISION REPRESENTATIVES
Catherine Benitz
Rod Price
Sachin Dev Pavithran




The Council on Consumer Affairs (COCA) presents and addresses issues of concern from the perspective of individuals with disabilities and their families through enhanced communication within the CPD. COCA also provides consumer representation on the CPD Advisory Board and works to improve the quality of life for individuals with disabilities and their families through a variety of activities, including a statewide electronic newsletter. This newsletter addresses a wide variety of disability issues and invites comments and participation from consumers across the state of Utah.




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Directors

J. Dennis Odell, MD
Biomedical
Division Director

Cyndi Rowland, PhD
CPD Associate Director
Richard N. Roberts, PhD
Research and Evaluation
Division Director

Judith Holt, PhD
Interdisciplinary Training
Division Director
Alan Hofmeister, PhD
Technology
Division Director

Susan Nittrouer, PhD
Exemplary Services
Division Director

Richard Baer, PhD
Outreach, Development, and
Dissemination Division Director

John Copenhaver, ME
Technical Assistance
Division Director
Ron Torres, MD
Biomedical
Division Director

Nancy Yonk
Business Office
Manager




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Awards & Appointments

Martin Blair
Education and Policy Editorial Board
Assistive Technology (RESNA Journal)



Barb Fiechtl
DEC Service to the Field Award
Utah Council for Exceptional Children



Mark Innocenti
Editorial Board, Infants and Young Children
Editorial Board, Journal of Early Intervention
Editorial Board, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education
Editorial Board, National Head Start Association Dialog
Guest Editor, Young Exceptional Children
Guest Editor, Early Childhood Research Quarterly



Vonda K. Jump
Prestigious Leaders for the 21st Century Fellowship
Zero to Three



Sue Olsen
DEC Service to the Field Award
Utah Council for Exceptional Children



Susan Nittrouer
Editorial Board, Volta Review
Editorial Board, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research



Sarah Rule
Associate Editor, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education
Editorial Review Board, Journal of Early Intervention



IOTI Steering Council
Sarah Rule & Marvin
Fifield
Sustaining Partner Award
Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind
Utah Association for the Deaf



Nancy Yonk
Professional Employee of the Quarter
Professional Employee Association, USU





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Fiscal Information 2003

Total Fiscal Year Funding: $13,530,267






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Proposals Submitted

Listed in order by Principal Investigator(s), followed by Title, Agency and Amount


Akers, A.
Universal Application System
Indiana Children First Center
$18,180


Baer, R.
Boys and girls club helping children with disabilities
ADD
$138,072

Baer, R.
Bear River Activity and Skill Center
Division of Services to People with Disabilities
$300,000


Baer, R.
Continuing followup of Utah students exiting special education
USOE
$79,872

Baer, R.; Hammond, M.; Price, R.
Improving the lives of individuals with visual impairments through technology training
OSERS
$72,635



Blair, M.E.; Kulyukin, V.; Salzberg, C.
Intelligent voice control of electronic devices
NIDRR
$150,000



Blair, M.E.
Competency-based assistive technology training
IOTI
$45,000

Blair, M.E.
Technical assistance to Rocky Mountain Disability Business TA Center
RMDBATC
$50,400


Blair, M.E.
Utah Assistive Technology Project
NIDRR
$370,276

Blair, M.E.; Hammond, M.
Utah Assistive Technology Program
NIDRR
$370,276


Boyce, G.C.
Utah Frontiers Project--supplement
Utah Dept. of Health
$16,720

Boyce, G.C.
Evaluation of In-Reach Tech Project: Can computer mediated communications systems support families in NICU and ensure effective transition to Part C services?
NICHD/OERI
$199,998


Boyce, L.? Innocenti, M.S.
Utah preschool curriculum comparison
USDOE
$444,402


Copenhaver, J.
Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center-year 6
OSEP
$1,344,000

Copenhaver, J.
General supervision data project: Special education accountability
State of Arizona
$9,936

Copenhaver, J.
Transition to teaching
State of Arizona
$53,298

Copenhaver, J.
Due process mediation procedures
BIA
$104,465

Copenhaver, J.
TA-Evaluation of state improvement grant activities
State of New Mexico
$64,800

Copenhaver, J.
Center to improve access to general education curriculum for students with disabilities of Research
American Institutes
$33,476


Copenhaver, J.
Complaint investigation services
State of New Mexico
$227,748

Copenhaver, J.
Statewide assessment of special education monitoring
State of Wyoming
$100,000

Fifield, M.
Indian Children's Program-year 2
DHHS
$691,281

Goetze, L.
Hearing cost analysis-subcontract
Utah Dept. of Health
$64,937

Goetze, L.
Bridges in the lives of youth: Community adjustment and transition outcomes
OSERS
$150,000


Goetze, L.
Effects of school programs on transition and quality of life
OSERS
$179,994

Goetze, L.
Outcomes of care coordination for transitional youth with special health care needs
CDC
$1,016,467


Hammond, M.
Training and information for culturally diverse and underserved individuals with disabilities
IOTI
$38,500


Hammond, M.; Price, R.
Vision technologies
IOTI
$44,500

Higbee, T.
USU early childhood autism program
Utah State Office of Ed.
$109,734


Holt, J.
Independent living national training and TA-subcontract
Baylor University
$7,000

Holt, J.
LENDlinks-subcontract, year 2
Indiana University
$28,001

Holt, J.
Northern Utah Area Health Education Center-year 2
Weber State University
$43,134

Holt, J.; Box, P.
Bottom-up modeling of mass pedestrian flows: Implications for the effective egress of individuals with disabilities
NIDRR
$150,000


Holt, J.; Christensen, K.
Bottom-up modeling of mass pedestrian flows
NSF
$450,000


Holt, J.; Christensen, K.
Developmental impact of complex/adaptive outdoor learning
USDOE
$20,000
environments on young children


Innocenti, M.S.
Bilingual early language and literacy support (BELLS) supplement
NIH/HHS
$9,439

dollar amount: Proposals Submitted = $12,150,049


Since 1996, the Assistive Technology Laboratory has trained hundreds of students in the development and adaptation of technology for people with disabilities.The lab serves as a training site for the Departments of Communicative Disorders, Special Education and Rehabilitation, Computer Science and Engineering, and Industrial Technology Education.Students are brought together with people with disabilities in the community to learn about and meet their specific needs. The number of trainees using the lab for hands-on projects has nearly tripled in the past five years.



Innocenti, M.S.
Bilingual early language and literacy support (BELLS) supplement
NIH/HHS
$118,056


Innocenti, M.S.
BELLS progress report
NIH/HHS
$405,300


Innocenti, M.S.; Jump, V
Guadalupe's children: A follow-up study of Guadalupe school graduates
CURI
$29,575

Innocenti, M.S.; Allsop, L.
Pilot study of the effectiveness of an interveneer for children who are deafblind
NICD
$275,995

Jump, V.
Thumbs up or thumbs down: External evaluation of Hilton/Early Head Start Training program
Sonoma State University
$29,998

Kulyukin, V.A.; Blair, M.E.
Universal access to indoor environments through distributed tracking and guidance
NSF
$1,049,811


Kulyukin, V.A.; Blair, M.E.
Distributed tracking and guidance in indoor environments
CURI
$32,000

Nittrouer, S.
Early development of children with hearing loss
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
$359,493

Nittrouer, S.
Ontogeny of segmental speech organization
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
$212,720


Remund, K.; Torrie, M.; Blair, M.E.
Self-injury protection device
USDOE
$100,000

Roberts, R.
Research and innovation outcomes evaluation services and results for children with disabilities
OSERS
$179,998

Roberts, R.
Rocky Mountain Public Health Education Consortium:MCH certificate program
University of Arizona
$6,579

Roberts, R.
Champions for progress institute: Leadership development for implementation of systems of care for children and youth with special health care needs
DHHS/MCH
$799,996

Roberts, R.
Opening Utah's Doors-year 3
MCH
$186,667

Roberts, R.
Research and training service coordination case studies of Part C eligible children and families-subcontract
University of Connecticut
$36,613

Roberts, R.
Utah Collaborative Medical Home Project-year 4
Utah Dept. of Health
$25,000

Roberts, R.
Champions for progress institute: Leadership development for implementation of systems of care for children and youth with special health care needs supplement
DHHS/MCH $300,000

Rule, S.
Core administration-year two
HHS/ACF
$397,973

Rule, S.
National Center for Disability and Access to Education
USDOE
$347,725
Salzberg, C.; Blair, M.E.; Menlove, R.; Rowland, C.

Torres, R. Abnormal expression of HLA proteins in brain cells of Cure Autism $60,000
autistic children Now Foundation


Dollar Amount: Proposals Funded



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Courses & Practica




Utah State University  
Department & Course Title Instructor Number of Students Total Credits
SPECIAL EDUCATION  
Adaptive, assistive, and augemntative equipment Deer 6 12
Preschool practicum Deer 6 18
Special education law Rudio 143 143
Preschool practicum for young children with disabilities Deer 6 6
Clinical teaching* Deer 6 36
Interdisciplinary training* Morgan/Holt 9 23
       
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY  
Technology for elementary education Lyman 14 42
Digital video and audio Risk 14 42
DVD production Risk 19 57
       
PSYCHOLOGY  
Developmental psychology Jump 14 42
       
FAMILY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT  
Infancy Cook 50 150
Human growth and development Cook 66 198
Parenting and child guidance * Boyce 66 198
Infancy and early childhood* Boyce 121 363
Survey of human development research Jump 6 18
       
THEATRE ARTS  
Acting for the camera Logan 6 18
       
Rocky Mountain Consortium (University of Arizona School of Public Health)
CSHCN Roberts 12 36
Certificate Program Leadership Proseminar Roberts 12 36
       
Box Elder Alternative High School
Careers in the Disabilities Field Baer 14 7
*Indicates courses taught more than one semester



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Training, Technical Assistance & Consultation

Activities by Participants and Core Function
Types & Numbers of Participants Core Function Total Number of Participants
Training Technical Assistance Research & Evaluation Information Dissemination
Students* 7,820 443 15 98 8,376 (17%)
Professionals/Paraprofessionals 16,815 7,518 787 6,100 31,220 (62%)
Family Members/Caregivers 626 618 0 2,480 3,724 (7%)
General Public 1,042 2,947 0 733 4,724 (7%)
Other 127 279 1,128 14 4,722 (1%)
Core Function Total Participants 26,644 11,899 1,930 9,570 50,043
 
*Students who are not formal CPD trainees attending workshops and presentations offered by CPD staff.



Activities by Area of Emphasis



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Publications & Products

BOOKS
Baer, R.D. & Hammond, M. (Eds). (2003). Helping people with disabilities: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.


CHAPTERS IN BOOKS
French, D., Valdes, L. & Rowland, C. (2003). Electronic Accessibility: USA and international perspectives (Chapter 8). In French, Hale, Johnson, and Farr (Eds.) Internet Based learning: A framework for higher education and business. 125-144, Victoria, BC, Canada: Trafford Publishing.

Hammond, M. (2003). Introductions and expectations. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.), Helping people with disabilities: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M. (2003). Learning disabilities. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.),Helping people with disabilities: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Rowland, C. (2003). Don't forget us! Creating institutional policy to support Web access for those with disabilities (Appendix 9.2). In French, Hale, Johnson, and Farr (Eds.) Internet Based learning: A framework for higher education and business. 179-184, Victoria, BC, Canada: Trafford Publishing.

Warren, C.C. (2003). Developmental delay. In R.D. Baer & M. Hammond (Eds.), Helping people with disabilities: A curriculum for high school students and boys and girls club members. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.


REFEREED ARTICLES
Agran, M., Blanchard, C., Wehmeyer, M. & Hughes, C. (2002). Increasing the problem-solving skills of students with developmental disabilities participating in general education. Remedial and Special Education, 23(5), 279-288.

Cook, R. Rule, S. & Mariger, H. (2003). Parent's evaluation of the usability of a web site on recommended practices. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 23(1), 19-27.

Innocenti, M.S. (2002). Evaluating programs in real time: Interpreting puzzle pieces. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 22, 86-90.

Nittrouer, S. (2002). Learning to perceive speech: How fricative perception changes, and how it stays the same. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 112, 711-719.

Nittrouer, S. (2002). From ear to cortex: A perspective on what clinicians need to understand about speech perception and language processing. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in the Schools 33, 237-251.

Nittrouer, S. (2002). A reply to "Innate phonetic boundaries revisited," by Aslin, Werker, and Morgan. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 112, 1261-1264.

Opitz, C., Savenye, W., & Rowland, C. (2003). Accessibility of state department of education home pages and special education pages. Journal of Special Education Technology, 18(1), 17-28. Reston, VA: Technology and Media Division of the Council for Exceptional Children.

Pindiprolu, S.S., Peterson, S.M.P., Rule, S. & Lignugaris/Kraft, B. (2003). Using web-mediated experiential case-based instruction to teach functional behavioral assessment skills. Teacher Education and Special Education, 26(1), 1-16.




Through the ASSERT program, children with autism are provided intensive teaching, helping prepare them for a successful school experience in inclusive classrooms.The program also offers clinical experience for graduate and undergraduate students as well as serving as a research site investigating autism issues.




Saylor, C.F., Boyce, G.C. & Price, C. (2002). Early predictors of school-age behavior problems and social skills in children with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and/or extremely low birthweight. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 33, 175-192.


NONREFEREED ARTICLES
Christensen, K.M. & Morgan, J. (2003) When child's play is anything but: To help children with disabilities design by types of activities, not types of equipment. Parks and Recreation, 38(4), 50-53.

Hammond, M., & Menlove, T. (2002). The Utah Assistive Technology Foundation believes independence is
priceless. We help make it affordable. CPD News, 25(2), 1 - 4.

Mariger, H., Rule, S., & Seo, K. (2003). Usability analysis: How to involve consumers in website design. Presentation to American Council on Rural Special Education. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Olsen, S. (2002). Leisure and recreation opportunities for differently-abled kids. CPD News, 25(4), 1-4.

Olsen, S. (2002). CPD's Up-to-3 early intervention program. CPD News, 25(4), 5-8.

Risk, T. (2003). Interactive DVD technology in education. Utah Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Theories and Practices: Technology and Learning in Tandem(XIV), 78-81.

Rowland, C., Smith, J., Blair, P., Lyman, M., & Virgin, J. (2003). Keeping Web accessibility in mind for our children: Project WebAIM helps K-12. CPD News, 26 (1&2), 1-11.

Rowland, C. (2002). Weaving the Web for all: Creating institutional policy to support Web access for those with disabilities. Proceedings of Ed-Media 2002, World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications. (Barker, & Rebelsky Eds.). American Association for Computing in Education. 2157-2177.


OTHER
Akers, A. & Thompson, C. (2003). Universal Application System [Web-based material]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Baer, R., Blanchard, C, Post, H. & Copeland, S. (2002). Best practices in family support, lessons from the FASTT project [Guide/Handbook & disk]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Benitz, C. (2003). The Relationship of HIPAA to special education [Monograph/Report]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Blanchard, C. (2003). Case studies in rehabilitation counseling: Rehabilitation planning [video and CD/ROM]. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Counselor Education Program.

Bohman, P., Smith, J., Anderson, S., Rowland, C., Whiting, J., Blair, P., Virgin, J., Lyman, M., & Pavithran, S., (June 2003). WebAIM.org: The 2003 Accessibility Training [CD-ROM]. Logan: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Christensen, K. & Morgan, J. (2002). Inclusive outdoor learning environments: An introductory guide [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Cook, R. S. & Rule, S. (2001). When face-to-face won't work: Internet-based focus groups. American Council on Rural Special Education 2001 Conference Proceedings:Growing Partnerships for Rural Special Education, 269-274.

Copenhaver, J. (2003). Health care training packet [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Copenhaver, J. (2002). Primer for maintaining accurate special education records and meeting confidentiality requirements with serving children with disabilities- Family Ed [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Copenhaver, J. (2002). Special education rights for parents of children with disabilities- BIA [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Copenhaver, J. (2003). Primer for special education advisory panel members and SEA staff [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.


In fiscal year 2003, the CPD paid students nearly $400,000 in graduate assistantships, wages, and stipends. More than 200 students received financial support as well as training through CPD projects.



Gallegos, E. (2002). Comparing and contrasting Title I and special education [Monograph/Report]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Hammond, M. (2003). A guide to Utah and federal disability-related laws. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Hammond, M. & Richards, C. (2003). Utah aging resources. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Innocenti, M.S. & Price, C. (2003). The relationship between Part C eligibility criteria and receipt of special education services in kindergarten and first grade. Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP)-A data brief for decision makers. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Innocenti, M.S. & Price, C. (2003). Five years later: The status of children once served in preschool special education programs (Section 619). Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP)-A data brief for decision makers. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Lake, S. (2003). An overview of special education transportation- A primer for parents and educators [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Mariger, H., Rule, S. & Cook, R. (2003). Creating family- friendly websites: A usability testing example [Audio-Visual & publication]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

Mariger, H., Cook, R., & Rule, S. (2002). The development and evaluation of a web-based preschool intervention curriculum. Head Start's Sixth National Research Conference Proceedings:The First Eight Years, Pathways to the Future 785-786.

Massanari, C. (2003). Math: The new frontier [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Massanari, C. (2003). Student centered IEP's: Connected to Standards [Guide/Handbook]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Miller, L., Rowland, C., & Virgin, J. (August 2002). Keeping web accessibility in mind [videotape]. Logan: Utah State University, ASD Project, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation.

Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B. (12/15/02). Super-Vision: A model for the teacher's role as supervisor of paraprofessionals: Final Report. Report submitted to OSEP.

O'Leary, E. (2002). IEP process for secondary transition [video]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.

O'Leary, E. (2002). IEP Process for secondary transition [Audio-Visual]. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center.

Rowland, C., Coombs, N. Bursthaller, C. (Oct 2002). ADA issues and requirements in distance education [videotape]. PBS Satellite broadcast: LeCroy Center for Educational Telecommunications, TX.

Rule, S., Mariger, H., & Cook, R. (2002). Informing families about recommended practices: Lessons learned from the Internet. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities.



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Student Support




TEACHING
CPD Interdisciplinary Training Stipends 18
Interdisciplinary Training in Assistive Technology 134
Projects Stipends Undergraduate/Certification 60
ULEND Long-Term Interdisciplinary Trainees 7
Distance Student Advisement 68
Practicum/Clinical Experience 19
Supervised Training Experience 13
University Courses Taught by CPD Staff  
Number of Courses 24
Number of Departments 5
University student credit hours generated 1,438
Number of students 590
 
GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISEMENT
Doctoral committees 13
Masters committees 9
   
STUDENT SUPPORT  
Graduate assistantships 28
Student employees 96



The experience that I gained at the CPD
is incredible. Working with consumers and families, as well as so many different people from different programs and backgrounds, gave me unique opportunities that will definitely help me in my career.
­2003 IDT Trainee

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Consumer Services



DIRECT SERVICES
Clinical Services 225
Feeding & Nutrition Clinic 27
Neurology Clinic 85
ADHD Clinic 492
 
COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICES
Medical Home Project 40
Utah Assistive Technology Program 1,159
Utah Alternative Financing Program 1,142
Child Care Nutrition Program 187
Bear River Activity & Skill Center 104
ASSERT 4
Up-to-3 542
   
TOTAL CONSUMERS 3,832


The Clinical Services diagnosis shed new light on the reasons why I am seeing certain behaviors and results. It has been very difficult to change our child's perception of his actions and to help him interact in new ways. Their accurate diagnosis and recommendations have made a big difference.




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National/International Presentations

Akers, A. (2002, September). Organizing services so families can use them easily. Tri-Regional Children's Special Health Needs Conference. Kansas City, MO.

Akers, A. & Behl, D. (2002 November). Participatory action research to evaluate community-based systems of care for children with special health needs. American Evaluation Association Annual Conference, Washington, DC.

Akers, A. & Boyce, G. (2003, February). InReach: Using technology to support the parent-infant relationship in the NICU and during the transition to home and early intervention. PACRIM Conference, Honolulu, HI.

Akers, A., Roberts, R.N., Behl, D. & Wolf, A. (2003, May). Necessary ingredients for creating sustainable participatory mechanisms for community early childhood. Campus-Community Partnerships for Health, Miami, FL.

Akers, A. & Roberts, R. N. (2003, March). A web-Based interagency application for children with special needs and their families. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs Annual Conference, Washington, DC.

Akers, A. & Roberts, R.N. (2003, March). A Web-Based interagency application for children with special needs and their families. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs Annual Meeting; Washington, DC.

Akers, A. & Roberts, R.N. (2003, February). Universal Application System. Pacific Rim conference on Disabilities Conference, Honolulu, HI.

Behl, D., Akers, A., & Roberts, R. (2002, November). Applying participatory action research to evaluate community-based systems of care for children with special health care needs. American Evaluation Association Conference, Washington, DC.

Blair, M. (2002, October). Assistive technology: Statewide collaboration to increase individual independence and community integration. Conference of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Blair, M. & Rowland, C. (2002, October). Vision 2020: Technology and disability. National Summit on Technology and Disability, Providence, RI.

Boyce, G.C. (2002, August). Stress and resiliency in families. Keynote speaker, National Downs Syndrome Congress, Denver, CO.

Boyce, G.C. & Akers, A. (2002, July). Contrasting two discharge experiences from the NICU to early intervention for extremely low birthweight infants. World Association of Infant Mental Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Boyce, G.C. & Akers, A. (2002, July). Opening the Lens of Early Intervention:Results of Infant Mental Health In-Service Training. World Association of Infant Mental Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Boyce, G.C., Risk, T., Akers, A. & Mabey, V. (2002, August). InReach: Using technology to support the transition from NICU to home and Part C services. Project Officers Meeting, National Center for Technology Innovation, Washington, DC.

Boyce, L.K., Cook, G., Jump, V.K., Akers, J.F., & Innocenti, M.S. (2003, April). Predicting early language development of Hispanic children: A look at parent-child interaction and acculturation. Society for Research in Child Development, Tampa, FL.

Boyce, L.K. & Innocenti, M.S. (2002, December). What do we know and where do we go? A look at culture and intervention: Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support Project (BELLS). Zero to Three's National Training Institute, Washington, DC.

Brogdon, M., Goldman, A., Fischlowitz-Leong, B., Nesbit, J., Blair, M., Rasinki, P., & Elrod, S. (2002, July)). Looking in the Tech Act crystal ball: What should reauthorization look like? Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, Atlanta, GA.

Brown, A. (2003, April). Analyses of early hearing detection and intervention in Utah. Posters on the Hill, Washington, DC.

Copenhaver, J. (2003, March). NASDSE Planning Meeting and BIA School Visit. National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Whitefish, MT.

Douglass, K. & Flake, M. (2003, April). Utah Frontiers Project. Posters on the Hill, Washington, DC.

Fifield, M., McClain, C & Morse, J. (2003, June). The Indian Children's Program:Exemplary programs working in our communities. Building Partnerships Joint meeting for program of IHS andSAMHSA, San Diego, CA.

Holt, J. and Sheen, J. (2003, February). Consumer direction in quality management: Changing employment supports. Administration on Developmental Disabilities Commissioners Forum, Washington, DC.

Holt, J., Sheen, J., & Chambless, C. (2003, March). Work incentives and the transition to work inrural areas. American Council on Rural Special Education National Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.
Innocenti, M.S., & Akers, J.F. (2002, July). Considerations on minimal effects: A comparison of relationship-based home visiting for at-risk children. World Association for Infant Mental Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Innocenti, M.S., Akers, J. F. & Boyce, L. (2003, May). The BELLS Project: Examining early predictors of literacy. International Reading Association Conference, Orlando, FL.
Innocenti, M.S. & Boyce, G.C. (2002, July). Stress in parents of children with disabilities: Integrating research and stakeholder perceptions to impact future directions. World Association for Infant Mental Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Innocenti, M.S. & Boyce, L.K. (2003, March). The Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support Project issues and intermediate outcomes-acculturation, language, and literacy. Society for Applied Anthropology, Portland, OR.

Innocenti, M.S., Akers, J. & Boyce, L.K. (2003, May). The BELLS Project: Examining early predictors of literacy. International Reading Association, Orlando, FL.

Innocenti, M.S., Cook, G., Jump, V. K., & Roggman, L.A. (2003, October). Working from within to improve programs: Continuous process improvement. Roundtable presentation at the Association of University Centers on Disabilities Annual Conference, Bethesda, MD.

Innocenti, M.S., Boyce, L., & Roggman, L.A. (2002, July). Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support Project (BELLS). Symposium conducted at the World Congress on Reading Conference, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

Kulyukin, V.A. & Blair, M. (2002, July). Intelligent voice control of electronic devices. Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, Atlanta, GA.

Kulyukin, V.A. & Blair, M. (2002, July). Distributed tracking and guidance in indoor environments. Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, Atlanta, GA.

Mariger, H., Rule, S. & Cook, R. (2003, February). Creating family-friendly websites: A usability testing example. Pacific Rim Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, HI.

Mariger, H., Rule, S., & Seo, K. (2003, March). Usability analysis: How to involve consumers in website design. Roundtable Discussion at the 23rd Annual American Council on Rural Special Education. Salt Lake City, UT.

Nittrouer, S. (2002, May). Early OME: Implications for speech perception and pharmalogical processing. Otitis Media and Language Learning Sequelae: Current Research and Controversies, Washington, DC.

O'Leary E. & Williams, J. (2003, April). Vocational rehabilitation counselors and educators together - Making transition happen. Council for Exceptional Children Annual Convention and Expo, Seattle, WA.




Through the CPD Interdisciplinary Program, students in disciplines ranging from nursing to engineering have the opportunity to work as part of multidisciplinary teams providing services and supports to children and adults with disabilities and their families.Seminars, as well as clinical and research experiences, provide trainees with a broad understanding of disability issues.


Roberts, R.N. (2002, July). Services are organized in ways families can use them easily. Institute for leaders in state Title V CSHN programs, Baltimore, MD.

Roberts, R.N. (2002, September). Measuring family involvement in programs and systems for CSHCN (the M&M Project). Designing Systems of Care that Work for Children with Special Health Care Needs, Los Angeles, CA.

Roberts, R. N. (2002, November). How do we know that we have a system of care that works for families? Partners in Leadership Conference, St. Pete Beach, FL.

Roberts, R.N., Behl, D., and Akers, A. (2002, July). Building commuity partnerships to support integrated infant mental health systems of care. World Association for Infant Mental Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Roberts, R.N., Akers, A. & Behl, D. (2003, February). Achieving systems of care for children with special needs. Pacific Rim Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, HI.

Rowland, C. (2002, December). Web accessibility in postsecondary education, Webcast State Information Technology Accessability Initiatives, Washington, DC.

Rowland, C. (2003, April). The legal landscape for postsecondary institutions. Webcast sponsored by the Southwest Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center (DBTAC), Utah State University, Logan, UT.

Rule, S., Cook, R., & Mariger, H. (2003, March). Families tell us if the web works: Disseminating the SPIES curriculum. Pacific Rim Conference on Disabilities, Honolulu, HI.

Rule, S., Holt, J., Goetze, L., Blair, M., Roberts, R., Copenhaver, J. & Morgan, J. (2002, October). The Center for Persons with Disabilities: Partners in Progress. Association of University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Bethesda, MD.

Rule, S., Mariger, H. & Cook, R. (2002, December). Informing families about recommended practices: Lessons learned from the Internet. Division for Early Childhood, Council for Exceptional Children, San Diego, CA.

Urich, M. (2002, November). New millennium- Recruitment for the 21st Century.American Association for Education Employment National Conference, Indianapolis, IN.

Urich, M. (2002, June). Professional development leadership academy and accountability-the Arizona Model. National Staff Development Council Leadership Academy, Ameilia Island, FL.

Williams, J. & O'Leary, E., (2002, April). Vocational rehabilitation counselors and educators: Making transition happen together. National CEC Conference and Expo, Seattle, WA.




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Project Directory

Administrative Support Services
An Outcomes-based Approach to Evaluating Part C Service Coordination Models
Arizona ACPE/SIG Activities
Arizona Center for Professions in Education (ACPE)
Arizona General Supervision (Data Collection)
Arizona Transition to Teaching Project
Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training
Bear River Activity and Skill Center
Beyond Access
Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support
Boys & Girls Club Helping Children With Disabilities
Bridges in the Lives of Youth with Disabilities
Bureau of Indian Affairs Complaint Investigation
Bureau of Indian Affairs Due Process/Mediation Procedures
Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Education ISEP Verification Audits
Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Education Monitoring
Center to Improve Access to the General Education Curriculum for Students with Disabilities (ACCESS)
Child Care Nutrition Program
Clinical Services
Collaborative Early Childhood Special Education Program through Distance Education (CESCEP)
Continuing Follow-Up of Utah Students Exiting Special Education
Coordinated Family Support: A Medical Home for Children with Special Health Care Needs (CFS)
Cost of EHDI Programs
CPD Feeding and Nutrition Clinic
CPD Publications
Curriculum Reform: The Development of a Curriculum Template for Applied Problem-Solving in Distance
Elementary and Middle Schools Technical Assistance Centers (EMSTAC) 35
Estimator 02-03
Family Alliances for Supports Today & Tomorrow
Family Resource Library
Fundamentals of AT: Skill and Competency-based Training
Helping Educate low-Income Parents in Nutrition for Growing Children
Hispanic Paraeducator Initiative
Indian Children's Program
Infant Massage in Ecuadorian Orphanages
InReach: Using Technology to Ensure Effective Transition From NICU to Part C Services
Interagency Outreach Training Initiative (IOTI)
Interdisciplinary Training (IDT)
K-SAR Video Production and Distance Learning
Learning Anytime, Anywhere, for Anyone: Keeping Web Accessibility in Mind
Leisure and Recreation for Differently-abled Kids
LENDlinks 44
Measuring and Monitoring Community-Based Integrated Systems of Care
Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC) Region 5
National Service Inclusion Project Minigrant
New Mexico Evaluation of State Improvement Grant Activities
New Mexico Technical Assistance, Personnel Development, and Training
Northern Utah Area Health Education Center (NUAHEC)
Opening Utah's Doors
Prevention and Treatment of Reading Failure
Program Development and Administration
Regional Educational Interpreter Assessment System (RAS)
Repurposing Olmstead Training Materials for a Wider Audience
Rocky Mountain Public Health Education Consortium: MCH Certificate Program
Salaries and Work Experience of Centers for Independent Living Directors: National Survey
Speciality Clinics
SPIES Outreach Project (Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Settings)
The Ontogeny of Segmental Speech Organization
The PARAgraph
The Utah Assistive Technology Program
The Utah Traumatic Brain Injury Planning Grant
Touch and Failure to Thrive
Up - To - 3 Early Intervention
Utah ADA Steering Committee
Utah Alternative Financing Program
Utah Alternative Financing Program: Minority Outreach
Utah Collaborative Medical Home Project Evaluation
Utah Early Intervention Project - Follow-Up
Utah Frontiers Project: A System of Care for Children and Youth with Serious Emotional Disturbances
Utah Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Regional Program (ULEND)
Utah Legislative Coalition for Persons with Disabilities
Utah Multi-Sensory Consortium: Statewide preparation of early childhood specialists and K-12 teachers
Utah Work Incentive Initiative (UWIN)
Utah Work Incentive Initiative-Evaluation (UWIN-EVAL)
WebAIM K-12: National Institute on Keeping Web Accessibility in Mind in K-12 Education
Wyoming Technical Assistance for Assessment of Special Ed Monitoring


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Project Descriptions

Administrative Support Services
Contact Person:
Sarah Rule
Funding Source: Utah State Legislature, Overhead from Grants and Contracts
Funding Amount: $1,237,501

Description:
University funds support both the work of divisions and the administrative functions that support all programs operated by the CPD. State funds provide the match required for externally funded research, education, services, and dissemination projects. The administrative support necessary to conduct these projects includes computer networking, hardware and software consultation, media development, information dissemination, accounting and purchasing services, procedural assistance with university reporting and regulations, and assistance to consumers and families.


An Outcomes-based Approach to Evaluating Part C Service Coordination Models
Contact Person:
Richard Roberts
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $179,999

Description:
The goal of this three year study is to identify those service coordination strategies that best support service system efficiency and child and family quality of life. It will investigate current Part C coordination models particularly in terms of child and family outcomes as well as costs associated with different models. Three service coordination models will be evaluated, drawn from six communities. Two hundred ten children ages birth to 3 years with disabilities and their families will be recruited. The models include: (1) an "independent" model; (2) a "combined-roles" model; and (3) a "one-stop shopping" model. A variety of qualitative and quantitative methodologies will be used. Primary outcomes and products from this study will be: (1) an analysis and critique of each model in relation to child and family outcomes, (2) data to inform the government on achievement related to OSERS' GPRA outcomes for Part C, (3) a determination of costs in service coordination and direct service outcomes, and (4) a framework to guide future outcomes-based evaluations of service coordination.

Arizona ACPE/SIG Activities
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Arizona Department of Education
Funding Amount: $91,908

Description:
The MPRRC will work with the Arizona Department of Education to improve the education system by implementing a number of objectives and activities to meet three goals: (1) to provide sufficient numbers of certified special education teachers; (2) to ensure that students with disabilities in charter schools have access to quality programs; and (3) to attain statistically significant reading gains through the use of scientifically-based research validated strategies.

Arizona General Supervision (Data Collection)
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Arizona Department of Education
Funding Amount: $9,936

Description:
The MPRRC is working with the Arizona Department of Education to shape the accountability of special education systems in ways that (a) drive and support improved results for children with disabilities and their families, and (b) will focus on establishing ongoing and reliable statewide systems to document and enhance accountability through the CIMP.

Arizona Transition to Teaching Project
Contact Person: John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Arizona Department of Education
Funding Amount: $53,298

Description:
The MPRRC is working with the Arizona Department of Education to design new comprehensive customized and effective models of long-distance learning, alternative routes to certification, marketing and benefits, programs, teacher and principal training, and mentoring/follow-up.

Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training
Contact Person:
Thomas Higbee
Funding Source: Utah State University and fees
Funding Amount: $16,500

Description:
Like other states in recent years, Utah is experiencing increases in the number of children diagnosed with autism and autism spectrum disorders. However, specialized services for these children are limited in rural Utah. The ASSERT program supplements public school services for preschool children with autism and their family members by providing intensive instruction. Its goal is to prepare children for successful school experience in inclusive classrooms. ASSERT is sponsored by the Center for Persons with Disabilities and the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University. The program provides intensive teaching, particularly in the areas of language and social skill development, for young children and provides support to families. It also offers clinical experience for graduate and undergraduate students from several academic departments and serves as a research site to investigate autism issues. The ASSERT Community Advisory Committee includes family members of individuals with autism, representatives of state and local agencies, and university faculty. In the summer 2003 semester, ten students from two University departments participated in serving four children and their families.


Bear River Activity and Skill Center
Contact Person: Richard Baer
Funding Source: Department of Mental Retardation &
Developmental Disabilities; Vocational Rehabilitation; Private Payment
Funding Amount: $529,448

Description:
BRASC provides training in functional academic, social, daily living, and prevocational skills to adults with disabilities. Job development and placement services are provided utilizing competitive job-based training and supported employment service delivery models. In addition, BRASC offers family support services including respite, latch key, summer recreation, and supported living services.

This year the university reviewed BRASC's supported employment activities and determined that some of them represented too great a risk and were illegal. Subsequently, the Brigham City based portion of the program providing those services was spun off to the private sector. The new provider, Life-skills & Individual Needs Center (LINC), continues to serve as a training site and to cooperate in grant writing and research efforts.

Each year, BRASC serves approximately 100 people with disabilities, employs approximately 50 students, and serves as a training site for students participating in an interdisciplinary training program.



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Beyond Access
Contact Person:
Jill Morgan, Keith Christensen
Funding Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Funding Amount: $134,727

Description:
The Beyond Access project is a recently funded Project of National Significance emphasizing the inclusion of children with disabilities in public play environments supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Over the next three years, the Beyond Access project will provide technical assistance to both consumers and designers/manufacturers of playground equipment, using print and electronic media. The project's educational tools will focus on ability rather than disability, emphasizing accessibility (physical access) as well as inclusion (social access) that contributes to children's development.


Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support
Contact Person:
Mark Innocenti
Funding Source: National Institute of Child Health & Office of Educational Research & Improvement-USDOE
Funding Amount: $396,900

Description:
The Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support (BELLS) project is funded by NIH and OERI to test the language and emergent literacy outcomes of Spanish-speaking/bilingual children who are either enrolled in an early childhood program that includes English exposure/immersion, a quality literacy/language preschool environment, and home language and literacy support or are in a community where limited early childhood experiences are available. The BELLS project began its third of five funding years in July 2002. For children and families enrolled in BELLS, assessment occurs at 18, 24, 36, and 48 months of age and prior to kindergarten entry. Assessment consists of measures of child and mother language skills, parent support of literacy experiences, maternal language facilitation, language/literacy aspects of the home environment, child preliteracy skills, and quality of childcare/preschool settings. This will result in a rich, longitudinal database on the language and literacy environments of the child. A number of research questions have been identified that will provide information important to the field regarding the language and literacy experience of low-income Spanish speaking children and the specific effects of an extensive early childhood intervention. The research questions are: (1)Does early English immersion of infants from Spanish-speaking families, beginning at ages 1, 2, or 3, facilitate English language and emergent literacy skills by ages 4 and 5? (2) Does an enriched home language & literacy environment, whether in English or Spanish, facilitate language and emergent literacy skills in relation to early English immersion? (3) Do specific intervention strategies, focused on language and emergent literacy, that are individualized and developmentally appropriate in naturalistic contexts improve the acquisition of language and emergent literacy in both English and the home language? (4) Are these relations moderated by other factors such as: child factors (age, developmental level, gender), parent factors (language, literacy, educational values, responsiveness), family factors (socioeconomic status, family size), and social factors (cultural and ethnic identity, immigrant and generational status)?


Boys & Girls Club Helping Children With Disabilities
Contact Person:
Richard Baer
Funding Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Funding Amount: $134,503

Description:
The project is a cooperative effort between Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD), the Lincoln Center Boys & Girls Club (B&G Club), and Box Elder School District. Using a modified educational research and development model, curriculum materials have been developed to teach minority/disadvantaged youth about disabilities and careers in the disabilities field. Fifty students wishing to participate were identified through the B&G Club and the school district. They were trained through a series of classroom and practicum experiences incorporating opportunities to work with children with disabilities in a variety of inclusive settings. Service learning / citizenship credit, university credit, and a variety of prizes for training completion were offered as incentives for participation. As a result of the project, students (1) gained knowledge of disabilities and careers in the disability field; (2) showed improved attitudes toward individuals with disabilities; (3) became more likely to plan or consider planning a career in the disabilities field; and (4) expressed a high level of satisfaction with the training program. Materials developed by the project allow for replication and will be disseminated via a web page, publications, and state and national conference presentations. Thus, the project has the potential for impacting communities across the nation and beyond.

Bridges in the Lives of Youth with Disabilities
Contact Person: Linda Goetze
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $335,406

Description:
This study brings together a rich longitudinal extant base of student developmental scores, descriptions of school services and settings, family demographics with measures of social inclusion and post school outcomes.


Bureau of Indian Affairs Complaint Investigation
Contact Person: John Copenhaver
Funding Source: OSERS
Funding Amount: $92,180

Description:
This project ensures that the BIA/OIEP meets the legal responsibility of CRR 300.660.300.552 by establishing process and trained staff to address complaint investigation in a timely and effective manner.


Bureau of Indian Affairs Due Process/Mediation Procedures
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs
Funding Amount: $104,465

Description:
The MPRRC provides technical assistance for ensuring the BIA/OIEP meets the legal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for due process mediation procedures. Assistance is provided in recruiting and training contract due process hearing officers and mediators to handle requests under the direct supervision of BIA/OIEP staff.

Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Education ISEP Verification Audits
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs
Funding Amount: $311,746

Description:
The MPRRC works with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to develop and implement a new BIA special education monitoring process that focuses on positive results for children with disabilities in BIA-operated, grant, and contract schools.

Bureau of Indian Affairs Special Education Monitoring
Contact Person: John Copenhaver
Funding Source: OSERS
Funding Amount: $312,000

Description:
The Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center assists the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the development and implementation of a schoolwide monitoring and improvement process that focuses on positive results for children with disabilities in the Bureau of Indian Affairs operated, grant, and contract schools


Center to Improve Access to the General Education Curriculum for Students with Disabilities
(ACCESS)

Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: American Institutes for Research
Funding Amount: $34,776

Description:

The MPRRC works in conjunction with American Institutes for Research to improve access to the general curriculum for students with disabilities across the MPRRC 11-state region.


Child Care Food and Nutrition Program
Contact Person:
Jeanie Peck
Funding Source: Utah Department of Education
Funding Amount: $134,112

Description:
This project administers the child nutrition program for family home child care providers. Providers receive training in standards of quality day care and nutrition program guidelines. Providers are given support and technical assistance. Meals served to children are reimbursed through federal funds.


Clinical Services
Contact Person:
Susan Nittrouer
Funding Source: Client Fees
Funding Amount: $45,964

Description:
Clinical Services staff strive to develop and maintain exemplary service programs to assure that client needs are met in a professional and ethical manner. Clinical Services serves as a clinical training site for USU students and the identified child clinical training practicum site for doctoral level psychology students at USU. The program financially supported two doctoral level psychology students with assistantships for advanced child clinical training. Multidisciplinary assessment/evaluation and treatment services are provided at a reduced cost to children, youth, and families and to adults with suspected learning or attentional problems or developmental disabilities. Referrals come from community agencies, school personnel, physicians, and private individuals. Additionally, Clinical Services staff provide disability evaluations for children and adults referred by Disability Determination Services for residents of the northern region of Utah. Clinical Services staff also provide consultation services to community agencies (i.e., Sunshine Terrace). Clinical Services staff work cooperatively with other CPD Divisions and community agencies on direct client services programs, training, and research projects.

Collaborative Early Childhood Special Education Program through Distance Education
(CESCEP)

Contact Person:
Marlene Deer
Funding Source: Utah State Office of Education
Funding Amount: $212,816

Description:
The CECSEP project offers access to a Utah certification program in early childhood special education (ECSE). Many students live far from one of the two institutions of higher education in the state that offer coursework leading to the birth-to-five ECSE teaching certificate (i.e., Utah State University and the University of Utah). The Utah State Office of Education is a partner with USU and the University of Utah to increase the numbers of personnel certified in ECSE in remote and rural areas. Most of the students involved in CECSEP are those who work full time in ECSE without proper certification. A typical student will take two courses a semester until their program is completed. The specialization coursework is delivered through multiple technologies including the statewide EDNET system which provides fully interactive, real-time, televised broadcasts and the Internet. CECSEP coursework is supported with a website (http://www.cecsep.usu.edu) where students can link to course materials, assignments (including the analysis of brief video clips), participate in "chats" with other students and instructors, and obtain information about program requirements, advisement, and funding opportunities. Practicum supervision is conducted over videoconferencing software in real-time. During lab experiences, local facilitators assist students in their home communities; thus students do not need to leave family or community ties to pursue a career in teaching young children with disabilities. The project supports faculty travel to coordinate across university programs, delivery of coursework via distance media, and tuition reimbursement for students who receive a 'B' or better on required coursework. Sixty-eight students were active this year.


Continuing Follow-Up of Utah Students Exiting Special Education
Contact Person:
Richard Baer
Funding Source: Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Funding Amount: $39,936

Description:
In 1992, Utah State University's (USU) Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) cooperated with the Utah State Office of Education to conduct a survey of students exiting special education in 1990-91 (Baer & Hennifer, 1992). The study sought information on former students' employment and job training experiences while in school; residential arrangements; employment; continuing education; community activities; access of social services; and arrest records. The original study was replicated in 1998-99 for students exiting special education in 1996-97 (Baer & Suter, 1999). Responses of the two cohorts were compared to document differences in the experiences of students exiting at the two points in time. In general, the data showed a disturbing yet improving picture. For example, drop out rates decreased by 4 percent but were still 29 percent of all those exiting special education, employment rates improved by eight percent, but unemployment was still 32 percent, and students living with their parents increased by 14 percent, but 20 percent more were pursuing continuing education. The present project is building on the previous two and is surveying students exiting special education in 2001-02. Comparison with the data from the two previous cohorts will allow determination of whether and in what respects life continues to improve for students exiting special education in Utah. Further, individuals in the cohort exiting in 1996-97 will be surveyed again to determine if their lives are improving over time.

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Coordinated Family Support: A Medical Home for Children with Special Health Care
Needs (CFS)

Contact Person: Judith Holt
Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
The Coordinated Family Support (CFS) project is designed to partner with the Budge Clinic, Medical Services, and Interdisciplinary Training at the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) to provide a medical home for families and their children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The project focuses on providing medical home services to families within the catchment area of the Budge Clinic, which includes parts of nine rural counties in Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming. At least 100 families who have CSHCN will receive resource information, assistance, and support in accessing programs and services that they have identified as important to their child and family. The Budge Clinic will be more knowledgeable about the barriers and challenges facing families with CSHCN. All families who have the Budge Clinic as their child's Medical Home will benefit directly from the increased skills of the clinic staff and will have stronger access to and connections with other families to provide ongoing support.

Cost of EHDI Programs
Contact Person:
Linda Goetze
Funding Source: Utah Department of Mental Health
Funding Amount: $64,937

Description:
Recent efforts associated with newborn hearing screening have been directed towards establishing programs that will identify the approximately 12,000 infants in the U.S. born each year with a hearing loss. Because attention has focused on the implementation of newborn hearing screening, few studies have been undertaken to determine the financial costs of early detection and intervention programs (EHDI). Determining the costs of EHDI programs will assist public health agencies in deciding how to best implement a hearing screening program. The purpose of this study is conducting a complete state-of-the-art economic analysis of the screening, follow-up, and diagnostic components of eight Utah hospital-based EHDI programs.

CPD Feeding and Nutrition Clinic
Contact Person:
Dennis Odell
Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
The CPD divisions of Exemplary Services (Early Intervention: Up to Three Program), Biomedical Services, Interdisciplinary Training, and the Departments of Communicative Disorders, Psychology, Nutrition and Food Science, and Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University have joined to develop and operate an exemplary feeding and nutrition clinic. The objectives include: (a) assembling stakeholders in health and nutrition-related fields to further define an exemplary feeding nutrition clinic service at the CPD; (b) developing intake and clinical service protocols; (c) developing and implementing a fee-for-service structure that is consistent with public and private insurance criteria; (d) developing relationships with pediatric health care providers throughout Utah and the intermountain region, in order to generate a greater consumer base for feeding and nutrition clinic services. (i.e., promotion and marketing of the service); and (e) evaluating the clinic services and individual outcomes, and make necessary revisions to ensure its future viability, including development of proposals to engage in future research and/or training activities. Twenty-eight students and nine clinicians served 33 children and families this year.

CPD Publications
Contact Person:
Caryl Blanchard
Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
The CPD Outreach Division prepares and disseminates, free of charge, three periodic publications of interest to various groups. CPD News offers articles of interest to the professional community. Each issue is disseminated internationally to approximately 2,700 subscribers quarterly. Research of CPD staff is often featured allowing for quicker dissemination than that offered by most professional publications. Parent News features articles designed to be helpful to families of children with disabilities; 1,900 issues are disseminated four times a year. Finally, Disability News is periodically published in Inside USU, reaching an audience of about 3,300 at Utah State University. Its primary purposes are to raise the consciousness of the university community regarding students and faculty with disabilities and to provide helpful information on supporting them.

Curriculum Reform: The Development of a Curriculum Template for Applied Problem
Solving in Distance

Contact Person: Cyndi Rowland
Funding Source: U.S. Department of Education; Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education
Funding Amount: $214,483

Description:
The purpose of this 3-year project is to create and evaluate the use of a low cost multimedia curriculum tool (hybrid CD-ROM with video and Internet capabilities) that will assist students, particularly distance education students, to (a) apply and reflect upon what they have learned with instructor support and feedback, and (b) participate in a community of learners who engage in constructive problem-solving. The project used a Research and Development design to create this curricular tool, Acropolis. During development, the project will support nine field-tests across five disciplines found in postsecondary education. Given formative data at the conclusion of each field-test, the curriculum will be refined and readied for the next field test. Dissemination of the findings and use of the curricular tool and process are important aspects of the project. Staff working on this innovative project hope to provide postsecondary education with a low-cost, practical, and replicable solution to the problem of getting students to apply what they have learned in their coursework and to participate with communities of learners.

By the end of the project period, the Acropolis tool had been field-tested by eight faculty across two university settings to teach 18 courses across five disciplines. Hundreds of students have evaluated the Acropolis learning experience to be an important experience, one that aided in their learning. Acropolis has been disseminated at national meetings and through print. The methods and the use of the tool, itself, will continue to be disseminated beyond the period of federal funding.

Elementary and Middle Schools Technical Assistance Centers (EMSTAC)
Contact Person: John Copenhaver
Funding Source: American Institutes for Research
Funding Amount: $45,607

Description:
The MPRRC works in conjunction with American Institutes for Research to identify and meet technical assistance needs of elementary and middle schools within Region 5.


Estimator 02-03
Contact Person: Dick Baer
Funding Source: Utah Department of Education
Funding Amount: $56,861


Description:
Federal special education regulations require that a severe discrepancy between aptitude (IQ) and achievement be identified as one criteria for qualifying a student eligible for special education under the category specific learning disability. The project has developed and is continually up-dating software for making the lengthy calculations necessary to determine if a student has a severe discrepancy under Utah's formula. A test selection committee meets monthly to review tests and determine their appropriateness for measuring aptitude or achievement. Tests approved are incorporated into the Estimator software program. Users input demographic information on the student along with aptitude and achievement scores. The software makes rapid and accurate calculations, and generates a report documenting how discrepancy was measured and whether it can be considered severe.

Family Alliances for Supports Today & Tomorrow
Contact Person: Dick Baer
Funding Source: Center Persons with Disabilities / Utah Parent Center
Funding Amount: $ 189,897

Description:
FASTT is a cooperative effort between the Center for Persons with Disabilities and the Utah Parent Center. The organizations cooperated in developing a model of family support that organized families at the community level to develop action plans for improving family support services. Emphasis was placed on better integration and coordination of existing services as well as developing local resources to increase services. A variety of materials have been developed including Action Team Training, Action Team Training: Facilitator's Guide, and Best Practices in Family Support: Lessons from the FASTT Project.

Family Resource Library
Contact Person:
Caryl Blanchard
Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
The Family Resource Library (FRL) contains approximately 2,000 books, educational games, software and videos for families of children with disabilities. The FRL is a lending library with free mailing of materials. Books and ordering information are listed in a catalog available upon request and on the Web. Procedural information and technical assistance are available to groups and agencies interested in replicating the library.

Fundamentals of AT: Skill and Competency-based Training
Contact Person: Martin Blair
Funding Source: Continuation/No contracted funding

Description:
The mission of the UATP is to expand availability of assistive technology devices and services through a consumer-responsive, comprehensive, statewide program of technology-related services. The project is administered by the CPD but jointly managed by a Board made up of the Directors of the State Division of Rehabilitation, Special Education, Family Health, Division of Services to People with Disabilities, private organizations, and consumers. The project provides information on assistive technology and assistive technology services , training materials, and technical assistance on funding. Special emphasis is placed on the systems change and consumer participation.



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Helping Educate Low-Income Parents in Nutrition for Growing Children
Contact Person:
Judith Holt
Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
The HELPING Children Project is a one year grant designed to address the nutritional needs of low-income families in the tri-county area of Northern Utah. The primary goal of this project is to facilitate interagency collaboration and provide recommendations for the provision of nutritional services within a system of coordinated interdisciplinary service.The project established Nutrition Coalitions which involve various community agencies working with low-income families to coordinate efforts and reduce redundancy of both paperwork and information. The project conducted nutritional surveys of at least 50 low-income families who have infants or toddlers under the age of three with developmental disabilities, special health care needs, or have been identified as at risk. Based on the results of these surveys, more in-depth nutritional assessments will be conducted by registered dieticians. A plan will be developed with each of these families to meet the individualized needs of each family. These plans will involve other agencies in a coordinated effort to assist the families meet their established goals. Monthly or bi-monthly home visits will also be made to instruct families and assist them as they learn to develop a more healthy lifestyle for both parents and children.

Hispanic Paraeducator Initiative
Contact Person:
Jill Morgan, Monica Jimenez
Funding Source: CPD*

Description:
The Hispanic Paraeducator Initiative is designed to support the employment and training of members of the local Hispanic community as paraeducators (classroom assistants, teacher aides) in local schools. These may be high school students or adult members of the community. The beneficiaries of this initiative include: (1)young Hispanic students who receive classroom support from a cultural peer, who is also a role model of academic success; (2) the Hispanic paraeducators, who are provided with employment, an insight into education as a career option, and increased self-esteem as their skills and contributions are valued; and (3) school district personnel, who can learn to appreciate the contribution that the Hispanic community can make to school culture and success, including bilingual/translation services. Twenty-three adults participated in the summers of 2002 and 2003.

Indian Children's Program
Contact Person:
Marvin Fifield
Funding Source: Indian Health Services
Funding Amount: $691,281

Description:
This program provides diagnostic and clinical services to Indian children and families referred by the Indian Health Service, tribal organizations and other community-based programs on the Navajo, Hopi, and multi Pueblo reservations in New Mexico, Arizona, southern Colorado, and southern Utah. In addition, technical assistance and training is provided to the referring organizations in meeting the needs of children referred. The program is administered by the CPD as a consortium with the University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research, and Services in New Mexico and Arizona. An organizational consortium and management structure provides direction and evaluation to the project. The unique focus of the ICP program is that services are delivered in the homes and communities where the children live. Training and technical assistance provided by project staff are determined by the clinical needs of the children referred who are unable to obtain services from other resources.

Infant Massage in Ecuadorian Orphanages
Contact Person:
Vonda Jump
Funding Source: American Massage Therapy Association
Funding Amount: $149,989



Description:
An experimental/control research design was implemented to assess the effects of infant massage on growth, incidence of illness, stress levels, and behavioral indicators of infant mental health in Equadorian orphans.


InReach: Using Technology to Ensure Effective Transition From NICU to Part C Services
Contact Person: Glenna Boyce
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $199,997

Description:
The purpose of the InReach Technology Step 1 Project is to enhance the support families of infants who are eligible for early intervention (Part C) at birth receive through a coordination of services by the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and community Part C staff. InReach procedures were developed to create a seamless transition from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to home and into Part C services for infants whose families lived in the Salt Lake metro area. Innovative technologies by which the same procedures can be used by families who live in communities some distance from the NICU are being developed and evaluated. These include:

1. Utilizing desktop video conferencing technology to support the development of the joint Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) before the infant is discharged from the NICU;

2. Developing an informational DVD-video to inform parents and staff about NICU and Part C services and the InReach procedures; and

3. Establishing a Web site where families (via a password) can see the infant in the NICU as well as access various resources.

Project partners include Utah Baby Watch Early Intervention Program (BWEI), state office and BWEI community programs in Kaysville, Logan, St. George and Vernal and NICUs at the University of Utah and Primary Children's Medical Centers and LDS and McKay-Dee Hospitals.


Interagency Outreach Training Initiative (IOTI)
Contact Person:
Sarah Rule
Funding Source: Utah State Legislature
Funding Amount: $60,000

Description:
To systematically address the outreach training needs in Utah, state funding was obtained by the CPD to assist Utah's disability service agencies and consumer organizations in providing essential training and technical assistance. The Interagency Outreach Training Initiative (IOTI) addresses training gaps where other funding is not available such as paraprofessional education. In addition, the IOTI facilitates coordination of training efforts among disability service agencies and consumer groups in Utah. State agencies and organizations of consumers and families throughout the state participate in establishing training priorities and approving proposals for training activities. Participating organizations include the Office of Rehabilitation Services, the Utah State Office of Education's Services to Students at Risk, Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Division of Community and Family Health, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, Division of Aging and Adult Services, Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, and the Utah Parent Center. Consumer representatives are appointed by the Governor's Council for People with Disabilities. The project has provided continuous funding to train paraprofessionals and consumers in the areas of supported employment, positive behavioral supports, and interpreter certification. Aging, assistive technology, self determination, early intervention, and minority outreach are areas of need targeted for short term projects. Individual IOTI projects are listed below.


IOTI - Criminal Justice Issues: Crisis Intervention Team Certification
Contact Person:
Krista Dunn
Funding Amount: $13,788

Description:
In July of 2000, through an IOTI grant, the Salt Lake City Police Department developed and implemented a training program for police officers in which they would gain knowledge of mental illness and procedures for carrying out their law enforcement responsibilities with safety and sensitivity. Through this program a statewide certification program was put into place, and more than 100 Utah officers were trained and certified in the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program. An additional 612 individuals received CIT introductory training, including law enforcement officers, mental health providers, law enforcement dispatchers, victim advocates, youth and family specialists, concerned citizens, security personnel, professionals, consumers and family members. The SLC Police Department will continue to partner with other agencies to provide this needed project in Salt Lake City and other participating areas. Most importantly, mental health consumers are learning to recognize the logo/pin that each CIT member wears on his/her uniform and to understand that the officer is there to help. Awareness of mental health issues is escalating as a direct result of the Crisis Intervention Team program. Agencies other than the Salt Lake City Police Department are starting to realize the benefits of a Crisis Intervention Team and are writing policies to support these programs.


IOTI - Family Education: Minority Outreach
Contact Person: Marilyn Hammond
Funding Amount: $38,500

Description:
This project provided critically needed training, outreach and information in English and Spanish to culturally diverse, rural, and underserved parents, families, and individuals with disabilities across the state of Utah. Work was conducted in collaboration and coordination with other agencies and culturally diverse, disability-related organizations through a variety of methods including parent-to-parent networks, conference presentations, culturally diverse and agency training sessions, meetings, support groups, university classes, school assemblies, etc. The project completed a training and information needs assessment. Information in English and Spanish was developed and disseminated in print and via the web on the following topics: Disability-related information, services, systems of support and other resources; educational rights for children with disabilities; how to effectively advocate; where to find assistive technology resources and funding; how to include assistive technology in the IEP; helping students with disabilities; how to foster inclusion within schools, businesses, and the community; how to create and promote positive public relations; tips for reaching culturally diverse families; and promoting inclusion in rural communities

IOTI - Family Education: Outreach to Minority and Underserved Populations
Contact Person:
Helen Post
Funding Amount: $40,000

Description:
A cadre of 18 community parent trainers from urban and rural communities representing primarily two minority groups - Hispanic and Native American - were recruited and trained. They, in turn, provided outreach, information, training, and support to other parents and professionals in their community to establish mentoring relationships with them, to assist them in accessing services and programs, and to prepare them to participate effectively in the IEP and other planning processes to achieve appropriate services and programs for children with disabilities. These activities were conducted as part of the Reach Out, Reach Back efforts of the Utah Parent Center in collaboration with more that 34 community partners (individuals, agencies, and organizations), referring to the responsibility of all members of the community to develop reciprocal relationships to benefit children and youth with disabilities. Approximately 320 parents and professionals in 17 locations participated in the training. Numerous materials were developed, translated, acquired, or adapted for use in print and web-based formats.



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IOTI - Family/Consumer Employer Training
Contact Person: Pheobe Blackham
Funding Amount: $11,200

Description:
The Family/Consumer Employer Training established a statewide network of volunteer training to teach individuals and parents how to recruit, hire, train, and supervise direct-support staff to provide services for themselves or their family member(s). This local team of trained experts can continue to assist families and consumers with staffing issues and concerns. The training project developed local leadership across disability boundaries to positively affect families who have special needs around aging, mental health, child care, and physical and intellectual disabilities. A curriculum and hiring manual were developed that can continue to be used in training people to hire and supervise their own staff. Training participants reported satisfaction with this training opportunity and felt better prepared to hire and supervise their own staff as a result of their participation.

IOTI - Housing Issues
Contact Person:
Sandra Curcio
Funding Amount: $19,000

Description:
The Central Utah Center for Independent Living in conjunction with key allied providers developed and provided training directed to consumers, their families, community members and agency personnel in understanding housing services for people with disabilities. The trainings will be hosted by the Centers for Independent Living in Logan, Ogden, Salt Lake City, Provo, Price, and St. George. One hundred and fifty individuals participated in the training. Through this grant CUCIL was able to: gather experts from the Community Development Corporation of Utah (CDC), Disability Law Center, Division of Community and Economic Development, Neighborhood Non-profit Housing, Local Housing authorities, Utah Assistive Technology Foundation, and the Utah Statewide Independent Living Council for the development of a training guide, compilation of existing materials, and preparation of presentations; educate consumers, their families, CIL staff and allied professionals on methods of accessing housing within their communities; initiate or enhance relationships with the local housing authorities in each training area; develop an Independent Living plan for IL consumers to create individual housing plans for locating and maintaining a home; and evaluate the process and impact of trainings

IOTI - Interpreter Certification Training
Contact Person: Lee Robinson
Funding Amount: $44,200

Description:
Since 1994, the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind has offered certification assistance to uncertified persons working as sign language interpreters in rural areas statewide. In 1996, USDB received a grant from Utah State University, Interagency Outreach Training Initiative to expand training that would include employees working for other agencies. This expansion provides interpreter training expertise to individuals that otherwise would not have the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills in sign language interpreting. Technology allows USDB to reach individuals statewide. First the Utah Educational Network broadcasts USDB's interpreter training weekly to nine locations. Second, three weekend immersion workshops are presented throughout the year on the campus of USDB in Ogden. Overnight accommodations and meals are available free of charge. Third, a one-week intensive summer camp is offered to prepare participants for the State of Utah's interpreter certification tests. Finally, USDB provides a small reimbursement stipend to individuals taking state certification tests who have participated consistently in year round training. Over the past five years, Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind has helped almost 100 individuals pass state certification tests.

IOTI - Positive Behavioral Supports
Contact Person:
Sue Behle
Funding Amount: $49,112

Description:
This project provides training to adult service provider groups and family members about the use of positive behavioral supports. The project used a previously developed curriculum to provide systematic training to direct care and supervisory staff who work in community-based and ICF/MR programs. Participants complete field-based assignments on the job or in the home. The curriculum is based upon a model developed at the University of Utah Department of Special Education and then revised and refined to the specific needs of agency providers and parent groups. The curriculum combines the best of positive behavioral approaches including functional assessment and related positive interventions. It is designed to fit into a person-centered approach and encourage self-determination as well as to develop strong protections for the human rights of people with developmental disabilities. Over 200 paraprofessionals and 134 parents participated in the training this year.

IOTI - Sexual Violence Prevention for People with Disabilities
Contact Person: Grace Call
Funding Amount: $34,000

Description:
The Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault and the ARC of Salt Lake has combined resources to help prevent sexual violence against people with disabilities. Professionals around the state shared their expertise at a series of trainings for professionals statewide who serve people with disabilities to explore the following topics: collaboration and team building between the sexual violence and disability disciplines to ensure best practices when responding to victims of sexual violence; techniques for interviewing victims with disabilities; protocols for conductng investigations; mandatory reporting; therapy for adults with disabilities molested as children; construction of community-based, multi-disciplinary task forces to support people with disabilities through the criminal justic system; and prevention. To date, over 600 individuals have particpated in the training.


IOTI - Supported Employment Training
Contact Person: Becky Taylor
Funding Amount: $118,928

Description:
This project teaches paraprofessionals to serve as job coaches in supported employment. It uses a competency-based approach that teaches both knowledge and application of knowledge in the field. Community service organizations refer employees for the training on topics pertinent to experienced job coaches and the consumers they serve, and makes technical assistance available to address individual's needs. Sixty-five paraprofessionals participated this past year.


IOTI - Training for Benefits Planning and Outreach Counselors
Contact Person: Bill Young
Funding Amount: $14,800

Description:
This project teaches individuals from multiple agencies (Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, Division for Services for People with Disabilities, Independent Living Centers, Department of Workforce Services, Utah Association of Community Service Providers, and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation, which includes the Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired and the Division of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing) in various geographical locations which serve individuals with disabilities to do benefits planning and assistance counseling. Instructors from the SSA BPOA certification program conduct a 5-day workshop, followed by a 2-day follow-up session. This training will substantially increase the number of individuals in Utah who are qualified to provide benefits planning and assistance and make sure that the service is available from multiple agencies. Consequently more individuals with disabilities can receive this valuable service and, hopefully, choose to participate in programs which increase their integration and self sufficiency through employment. It is anticipated that 25 individuals will complete the training.


IOTI - Training for Providers of Services to Children (0-3) in a Mentored Mental Health Model
Contact Person: Debbie Justice
Funding Amount: $4,000

Description:
Practitioners from early intervention, child care providers, Head Start, Early Head Start, Mental Health, and Division of Services for People with Disabilities who serve families in a 7-county area of southern Utah participated in this training program which included a mentoring portion (infant/toddler filial play sessions with a licensed clinical social worker). The training is expected to increase participants' general knowledge of infant/toddler mental health; train participants in diagnosis and methods of treatment; and to facilitate the development of collegial relationships with others in the field.


IOTI - Training on Outreach to Rural Minority Communities
Contact Person: Cristina Clerico
Funding Amount: $21,000

Description:
This training conducted through the Association for Independent Living of Utah made it possible to (1) educate independent living center and allied staff about local racial and ethnic group culture and train them on effective outreach techniques; (2) initiate or enhance existing relationships between local minority group leaders as well as ILC and allied staff; (3) foster a structured process to develop and implement outreach plans in each of the six independent living center regions within the state of Utah; and (5) evaluate the process and impact of the training and plan implementation.


OTI - Transition to Adult Life and Section 504 Training Projects
Contact Person: Helen Post
Funding Amount: $50,000

Description:
The objectives of the project were to (1) update existing training materials, including the trainer-of-trainers curriculum and the parent handbook and a training script on Section 504; and (2) to train cadres of trainers comprised of 10-15 parents of youth with disabilities (ages 12-22) and 10-15 agency partners in five locations, urban and rural, across the state to collaboratively train participants on transition and Section 504; and (3) to widely distribute 5-8,000 pieces of print materials on transition and Section 504 throughout the state using a variety of dissemination strategies.


IOTI - Very Young Children and Mental Health Issues
Contact Person:
Kevin Fenstermacher
Funding Amount: $15,000

Description:
One hundred fifty-nine (159) in-home visitors (i.e., community health nurses, early Head Start providers, early intervention paraprofessionals and professionals) who work with infants, toddlers and their families across the Wasatch Front participated in the training which was designed to (1) provide information related to recognizing social-emotional developmental problems, (2) educate families regarding children's mental health needs, (3) provide in-home interventions to assist caregivers of children at risk for the development of psychosocial pathology, and (4) facilitate referrals and collaboration of services and resources. Several participants attended multiple training sessions and reported they were actively implementing the targeted intervention strategies. A special training session introduced a reflective supervision model to facilitate the incorporation of a mental health perspective into current practice. This supplemental supervision model was highly successful, and many participants expressed their desire for continued support and training using this approach. A training package of resource materials including screening, observational, and educational tools was made available to participants.

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Interdisciplinary Training
Contact Person:
Judith Holt
Funding Source: State E & G Funds
Funding Amount: $18,000

Description:
The Interdisciplinary Training (IDT) program provides opportunities for students, from a variety of disciplines, as well as consumers with disabilities, and family members of children with disabilities, to become part of interdisciplinary teams. These teams, with faculty mentors, will provide services and supports to children with disabilities and their families, as well as adults with disabilities. The didactic, clinical, and research components of this program are carefully designed and implemented to enhance the trainees awareness, knowledge, and skills with the growing trend towards collaborative interdisciplinary efforts in the workplace. There is an increased need for persons who have strong, well-developed interdisciplinary teamwork skills. Additionally, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has extended the need for awareness and knowledge of disability issues to all employers, employees, and to the general public. IDT trainees may participate in the Interdisciplinary Training program at one of three levels: Orientation/Awareness; Intermediate/Skill Development; or Leadership/Specialist/Experiential. Regardless of the level of competency selected, each trainee will develop an Individualized Training Plan, in consultation with an assigned faculty advisor and the IDT Director. The Individualized Training Plan addresses the IDT Core Competencies and Objectives. To fulfill these competencies, the trainee will participate in a series of seminars and select from a menu of clinical and research experiences. In addition to the broad array of services and settings for children and adults with disabilities, provided by the Center for Persons with Disabilities, community-based programs will also be utilized for training purposes. Both graduate and undergraduate students may apply for the IDT program. Stipends may be available for long-term trainees. The IDT program is also available for 1-3 hours of credit (undergraduate and graduate) through the Department of Special Education. The IDT program is also available to consumers with disabilities as well as family members of children with disabilities.

K-SAR Video Production and Distance Learning
Contact Person:
Thomas Risk
Funding Source: Client Fees
Funding Amount: $168,427

Description:
K-SAR Video Production Facility is an award-winning, state-of-the-art multimedia production facility located at the Center for Persons with Disabilities. K-SAR has a full-time professional production staff with a variety of technical skills in production, post-production, graphic, Internet web page development, and DVD-Video, DVD-ROM. and WebDVD experience.

Learning Anytime, Anywhere, for Anyone: Keeping Web Accessibility in Mind
Contact Person:
Cyndi Rowland
Funding Source: FIPSE
Funding Amount: $463,044

Description:
Keeping Web Accessibility In Mind (WebAIM) is administered through a grant provided by the Learning Anytime Anywhere Partnership Program (LAAP) out of the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). The goal of WebAIM is to improve the national picture of accessibility to web-based educational opportunities for individuals with disabilities. WebAIM utilizes the strength of national partnerships to accomplish the goal of the project. Those partners are: Teaching Learning through Technology, Affiliate of the American Association of Higher Education George Mason University, and BlackBoard Inc. Given the enormous problems in web site accessibility, WebAIM will help in the following ways: (1)disseminate materials that raise awareness and assist postsecondary institutions to identify and solve web accessibility problems; (2) create a systematic model for training and technical assistance to support the development of accessible web sites; (3) refine a web authoring tool (Blackboard) to support web accessibility at post-secondary institutions; and (4) develop a model for institutional coordination and reform to support web accessibility. In its fourth year of funding, WebAIM has received national notice as a leader in Web accessibility solutions (see www.WebAIM.org for specifics). To date, WebAIM has disseminated to over 6 million individuals the problems of Web accessibility and the project activities through electronic and print media. WebAIM staff and partners have delivered site-based dissemination to over 6,800 individuals attending national meetings. WebAIM staff and partners provided intensive site-based training to personnel on Web accessibility to over 1,000 individuals at over 40 postsecondary institutions nationwide. Moreover, WebAIM has provided training and technical assistance on its Web site to over 150,000 different users. One of the national partners, Blackboard, now offers a course management system that is accessible to students and faculty with disabilities. Finally, the WebAIM system of educational reform is being tested and used in postsecondary settings across the nation.



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Leisure and Recreation for Differently-abled Kids
Contact Person:
Sue Olsen
Funding Source: Utah Governor's Council for People with Disabilities
Funding Amount: $25,000

Description:
The project intend addressed the recreational and leisure activity needs of children with disabilities, ages birth through eight, living in the Cache Valley area (Logan and surrounding communities). City and county administrators expressed a committed interest and identified a need for staff training related to full inclusion of children and youth with disabilities. Additionally, parents of children and youth with disabilities participated in focus groups and surveys and identified and prioritized recreation/leisure activities desired by their children. This project has the capacity of impacting 200 infants and toddlers (ages birth through 3) and 400 children and youth (ages 3 through 8 years of age) with disabilities and their families living in the target communities. The activities of this proposal will also impact the community policy makers responsible for sponsoring activities and the program directors and activity facilitators/ instructors who are responsible for the successful completion of the communities' scheduled recreation and leisure events for young children and youth.

Objectives of the project plan to: (1) create an awareness and responsive commitment to the expansion and modification of at least ten priority recreation/leisure activities and programs to meet the needs and expectations of children and youth with disabilities; (2) provide training to approximately 50 administrators, program directors, activity facilitators/instructors (direct service providers), parents, and other appropriate individuals/groups in skills and methodologies to ensure fully inclusive experiences and accessible activities for children and youth with disabilities; (3) increase participation of children and youth with disabilities in community recreation/leisure activities and programs by at least 10%; and (4) identify the barriers for participation and access to recreation programs; and (5) modify and implement at least 10 priority recreation/leisure activities desired by children and youth.

LENDlinks
Contact Person: Judith Holt
Funding Source:Subcontract with Indiana University
Funding Amount: $28,001


Description:
LENDlinks is a partnership between the Riley Child Development Center at Indianapolis, Indiana and the Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University. LENDlinks is funded through the Maternal Child Health Bureau. Its purposes include developing and implementing a web portal, designed for use by LEND programs nationally, to disseminate best practice information about mental health in young children. In addition to the web portal, videoconferences will be available on an annual basis and a DVD produced based on the videoconferences.

Measuring and Monitoring Community-Based Integrated Systems of Care
Contact Person: Richard Roberts
Funding Source: MCHB
Funding Amount:$144,899

Description:
The purpose of this project is to develop and implement a national strategy for monitoring and reporting progress toward Healthy People 2010's performance outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN): Objectives include that:
· All CSHCN will receive coordinated ongoing comprehensive care within a medical home.
· All families of CSHCN will have adequate private and/or public insurance to pay for the services they need.
· All children will be screened early and continuously for special health care needs.
· Services for CSHCN and their families will be organized in ways that families can use them easily.
· Families of CSHCN will partner in decision making at all levels, and will be satisfied with the services they receive.
· All youth with SHCN will receive the services necessary to make appropriate transitions to adult health care, work, and independence.

Utah, Vermont, Ohio, Arizona, South Carolina, and Oregon are participating in the project.

Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC) Region 5

Contact Person: John Copenhaver
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $1,448,333

Description:
The MPRRC provides technical assistance to state education agencies in developing quality programs and services for children with disabilities. The MPRRC identifies and analyzes persisting problems that interfere with the provision of special education services. It links state education agencies experiencing similar problems, assists them in developing solutions and supports them in their efforts to adopt new technologies and practices. The MPRRC serves Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Arizona, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.


National Service Inclusion Project Minigrant
Contact Person: Sarah Rule
Funding Source: AUCD
Funding Amount: $6,000

Description:
Individuals with disabilities are often unaware of opportunities to serve communities as volunteers. Conversely, agencies whose work is assisted by volunteers may not be aware of how individuals with disabilities can contribute. This mini-grant from the Association of University Centers on Disabilities supports participation in the National Service Inclusion Project. Training and information about volunteer service opportunities is provided to individuals with disabilities in collaboration with organizations such as the Brain Injury Foundation of Utah and the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill.



New Mexico Evaluation of State Improvement Grant Activities
Contact Person: John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Utah Department of Education
Funding Amount: $64,800

Description:
The MPRRC works with New Mexico by providing technical assistance regarding evaluation of their State Improvement Grant activities.


New Mexico Technical Assistance, Personnel Development, and Training
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: State of New Mexico
Funding Amount: $227,748

Description:
The Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center provides technical assistance, brokering, personnel development, and training on behalf of the New Mexico State Department of Education.

Northern Utah Area Health Education Center (NUAHEC)
Contact Person:
Judith Holt
Funding Source: Subcontract with Weber State University
Funding Amount: $41,880

Description:
The NUAHEC is a collaborative endeavor between Utah State University, the Center for Persons with Disabilities, and Weber State University. The purpose of NUAHEC is to: (1) provide interdisciplinary practicum/clinical sites for medical students, residents, and an array of allied health professionals; (2) recruit elementary, secondary, and college students into health professions; and (3) retain health care professionals in unserved and underserved medical/health areas.

Opening Utah's Doors
Contact Person:
Richard Roberts
Funding Source: Maternal and Child Health Bureau
Funding Amount: $168,179

Description:
The Early Intervention Research Institute (EIRI) works in partnership with eight Utah state departments, community based programs and families to develop a common enrollment/eligibility process for families these agencies serve. A participatory action research approach was used to create interagency common eligibility/enrollment materials made operational through a shared data system. The use of blended funds to further this effort was being pursued with the agency/program partners that collaborate on the common application materials. An in-depth investigation to clarify how care coordination could be made more effective in the enrollment/eligibility process also will be conducted. This will be referred to as the 'C-4 model' (i.e., the four collaboration strategies). An outcome evaluation will determine the impact of this project in terms of positively affecting children, families, providers, and the service system, particularly in regard to Healthy People 2010 outcomes for children with special health care needs.

Prevention and Treatment of Reading Failure
Contact Person:
Alan Hofmeister
Funding Source: Continuation/No contracted funding

Description:
This project designs, develops, and field tests instructional methods and materials to prevent and treat reading failure. It also supplies technical assistance and materials to poverty-impacted communities nationwide. These communities range from Harlem to Puerto Rico to Native American communities in western states.

Program Development and Administration
Contact Person:
Sarah Rule
Funding Source: ADD
Funding Amount: $382,888

Description:
The Center for Persons with Disabilities seeks to support the independence, community inclusion, exercise of choices, and improvements in the quality of life of consumers with disabilities and their families. Since 1972 the Administration on Developmental Disabilities has provided core support for the administration and program development activities of the CPD. The core functions include interdisciplinary education, dissemination of information, exemplary services, and research and evaluation to promote independence and inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities into all aspects of community life. CPD faculty and staff who receive support from ADD core funding engage with other agencies and organizations of consumers with developmental disabilities to provide technical assistance and consultation to federal, state, and local service agencies; to help link resources; and to promote systems change. They generate external funding for these activities, currently conducted through approximately 60 programs and projects.

Regional Educational Interpreter Assessment System (RAS)
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho Departments of Education/Bureau of Indian Affairs
Funding Amount: $328,163

Description:
State education departments within and outside the MPRRC region, under the facilitation of the MPRRC, formed a partnership to develop and implement an educational interpreter assessment system to ensure high standards and quality services for children with severe hearing impairments. The consortium assists states to identify ways to help local agencies improve interpreter skills and also to offer testing and follow-up to individuals to improve their competence.

Repurposing Olmstead Training Materials for a Wider Audience
Contact Person: Judith Holt
Funding Source: OSERS-RSA
Funding Amount:$ 79,862

Description:
Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU) and its partners conducted five regional three-day training sessions on Olmstead in 2001-2002. All sessions were videotaped. The objective of this contract is to repurpose these materials to reach a wider audience especially the Centers for Independent Living, the State Independent Living Centers, and students transitioning from high school. In addition, IL NET has other relevant materials that will be part of the repurposing.

The approximate 24 hours of video footage will be edited into a series of 30-45 minute thematic segments. The segments could be augmented using structured questions, guided activities, and discussion points in a trainer's guide and accompanying participant manual. These segments could be packaged as self-paced training modules. Using the exercises and discussion questions in the workbooks and trainer's guide, along with closed-captioned video, an agency or group could use the package to provide training in a series of one hour or 90 minute sessions. The materials will also be available as self-paced learning modules available in print, CD-ROM, or on a website.

Rocky Mountain Public Health Education Consortium: MCH Certificate Program
Contact Person:
Richard Roberts
Funding Source: DBTAC
Funding Amount: $35,981

Description:
This project provides inservice training to public health workers in the four-corner region through a certificate program. Dr. Richard Roberts, Director of the Early Intervention Research Institute, teaches a yearly summer seminar for the certificate students and follows their progress through the year.


Salaries and Work Experience of Centers for Independent Living Directors: National Survey
Contact Person: Martin Blair
Funding Source: Contract
Funding Amount: $7,000


Description:
IL Net, a collaborative project of Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU) and the National Council on Independent Living, provides technical assistance to private, nonprofit Centers for Independent Living (CIL) and Statewide IndependentLiving Councils (SILC) throughout the United States. One of the questions most frequently received by IL Net deals with the salaries and work experience of CIL executive directors. Comprehensive national and regional information regarding salary ranges, work experience, and educational background of CIL executive directors has not been readily available to date. In employing new CIL executive directors, SILC and CIL governing boards (e.g., board of directors) have had to rely on fragmented and inconsistent information regarding the salary experience of executive director applicants. Salary histories of outgoing directors and information gathered from other local nonprofit organizations have typically been used to set salary and experience criteria for new CIL executive director positions.

To address this lack of information and enable IL Net to provide better technical assistance to both CILs and SILCs on these issues, IL Net contracted with the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) at Utah State University to conduct a nationwide survey of CIL executive directors. The purpose of the survey was to gather descriptive data regarding CIL executive directors' salaries, work history, educational background, number of employees supervised, number of consumers served monthly, and other related information.


Specialty Clinics
Contact Person:
Dennis Odell
Funding Source: Client Fees
Funding Amount: $47,154

Description:
Specialty clinics in developmental disabilities and neurology are held at the CPD periodically through Children's Special Health Services. In addition, referrals can be made to other specialty clinics held in other parts of the state by CSHS. Medical services are also provided to the Clinical Services Program as part of their evaluations. In addition, medical services are provided to assist those with developmental disabilities who need medication or follow-up.


SPIES Outreach Project (Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Settings)
Contact Person: Sarah Rule
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $494,347


Description:
Young children with disabilities, special health care needs, and those who are at risk for the development of disability often need supports in order to learn and develop through interactions in everyday settings. Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Setting (SPIES) is a print and video-based curriculum to help adults promote young children's development in everyday settings and during the daily routines and activities that are part of a child's life. The curriculum includes modules that address intervention opportunities, giving help, incidental teaching, intervention for infants, and tracking progress. The strategies addressed have been documented to be effective in developing language and other skills. The curriculum was field tested with personnel in various agencies including Head Start, child care, education, early intervention, and preschool. The curriculum,described at www.cpd.usu/spies, is available in print and captioned video in English and Spanish and a condensed version is available on CD ROM. Data from more than 365 participants indicate that SPIES training results in increased knowledge of intervention techniques. The curriculum has been adapted for family members. SPIES for Parents is available at the website www.spiesforparents.cpd.usu/. Family members' evaluation of the site indicate that it is useful and user-friendly.

The Ontogeny of Segmental Speech Organization
Contact Person:
Susan Nittrouer
Funding Source: NIDCD
Funding Amount: $212,720
Description:
This research is concerned with the development of phonological abilities in normal children and with what goes wrong in this process for children at risk for language problems. One area of interest is how normal children learn to extract phonemes from a complex acoustic signal that lacks explicit invariant information about those phonemes. Another area of interest is how the development of phonological knowledge is affected by conditions that put children at risk for language problems. Learning to recognize phonological structure in the acoustic speech signal is necessary for many other kinds of language skills, such as reading. Because children with even mild hearing losses or children growing up in poverty seem to have some language delay, it may be that a child's ability to discover the phonological structure of language is in turn dependent on such language experience. A long-term goal for this laboratory is to investigate what has gone wrong in the development of phonological knowledge in children who encounter difficulty learning language.

The PARAgraph
Contact Person:
Jill Morgan
Funding Source: Utah Department of Education
Funding Amount: $20,000

Description:
The PARAgraph is a state newsletter for school paraprofessionals designed to meet the needs of the 8,000-10,000 paraprofessional staff who work in education and related services in Utah. The newsletter is published three times per year (September, December, and March) with the December issue a double-sized conference issue, providing excerpts from the state paraeducator conference held in November each year. A project sponsored by the Utah Paraprofessional Consortium, the newsletter is produced at the Center for Persons with Disabilities and distributed through school districts and to individuals who have submitted their names for the mailing list. Many school paraprofessionals work in relative isolation, and are offered few opportunities for training or for networking and "professional dialogue" with colleagues. The PARAgraph has a very practical focus and contains articles on effective instructional and behavior management strategies, information on materials and training opportunities that paraprofessionals can access, including the annual state paraeducator conference; features on individual paraprofessionals working in a variety of roles from school districts around the state; and explanations of legal requirements and educational jargon. Contributors may be school district or university personnel, teachers, or paraeducators.

The Utah Assistive Technology Program
Contact Person:
Martin Blair
Funding Source: National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation
Funding Amount: $405,276


Description:
The mission of the UATP is to expand availability of assistive technology devices and services through a consumer-responsive, comprehensive, statewide program of technology-related services. The project is administered by the CPD but jointly managed by a Board made up of the Directors of the State Division of Rehabilitation, Special Education, Family Health, Division of Services for People with Disabilities, private organizations, and consumers. The project provides information on assistive technology and assistive technology services, training materials, and technical assistance on funding. Special emphasis is placed on the systems change and consumer participation.

The Utah Traumatic Brain Injury Planning Grant
Contact Person:
Judith Holt
Funding Source: Department of Health
Funding Amount:
$20,000

Description:
In April of 2001, the Utah Department of Health received a two-year federal grant to develop a state plan to help improve Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) services in Utah. The Brain Injury Association of Utah (BIAU) and the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) at Utah State University are project partners with the Department of Health on this grant. The overall goal of this project is to ensure that the 40,000 Utahns who live with the effects of a traumatic brain injury have access to a comprehensive, coordinated system of care and services.

Touch and Failure to Thrive
Contact Person:
Vonda Jump
Funding Source: University of Chicago Medical Center Subcontract
Funding Amount: $3,333

Description:
This pilot project at the University of Chicago Medical Center was funded by the University of Chicago. The focus investigates the effects of infant massage on behavioral and neurochemical processes as well as the parent-child interaction for infants and young children diagnosed with failure-to-thrive. Twenty infants who are receiving services from the Grow Clinic at the University of Chicago Medical Center will be randomly assigned to either the treatment (infant massage by caregiver) or control (rocking by caregiver) group. First morning urine samples will be collected and analyzed for cortisol, dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine before and after the intervention. Videotaped interactions between parents and children will be obtained before and after the intervention.


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Up - To - 3 Early Intervention
Contact Person:
Sue Olsen
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $930,350

Description:
Up-To-3 is one of 15 Early Intervention Programs in Utah, contracted with the Utah Department of Health which is the designated lead agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), Part C. The Up-To-3 program provides services to families with infants or toddlers, under the age of three, with developmental delays, disabilities or a diagnosed conditions with a high probability of resulting in developmental delay. Services from the Up-To-3 program are available in Rich, Box Elder, and Cache Counties. The mission of the Up-To-3 program is to enhance the family's capabilities and self-confidence to nurture their child's growth and development. Program staff implement family-centered practices which supports the philosophy that a family's concerns, values, priorities, and resources should establish the framework of services provided for their child and family. This process results in the development of an Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP).

Utah ADA Steering Committee
Contact Person:
Martin Blair
Funding Source: Rocky Mountain DBTAC
Funding Amount: $50,400

Description:
The Utah ADA Steering Committee was established as a subcontract to the Rocky Mountain Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center to: (a) organize a Utah Steering Committee for purposes of developing an annual plan and monitoring completion of that plan; (b) address employer lack of skill and knowledge as it pertains to working with people with disabilities; (c) provide web-based information for employers and employees; (d) develop strategies to ensure accessible information technology is available to employers, students, and parents at the primary and secondary levels; (e) ensure that web site accessibility is addressed in institutions of higher education in Utah; (f) provide information and education regarding accessible education-based information technology to educators statewide; and (g) conduct outreach through cooperation and participation in conferences targeting people with disabilities, parents, students and professionals who work with people with disabilities.

Utah Alternative Financing Program
Contact Person:
Martin Blair, Marily Hammond
Funding Source: National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation/Private Donations
Funding Amount: $500,000

Description:
The Utah Alternative Financing Program was a collaborative effort between the Utah Assistive Technology Program, the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation and Zions Bank of Utah. This grant expands the benefits and services of the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation by (a) decreasing the loan amount charged on loans for the purchase of assistive technology, (b) increasing the grant amount applied to loan principal for the purchase of assistive technology, (c) increasing the loan buy-down amount for modified vehicles, (d) enhancing public awareness activities, and (e) increasing the endowment fund of the Foundation to provide ongoing funding for low interest loan activities.

Utah Alternative Financing Program: Minority Outreach
Contact Person:
Marilyn Hammond
Funding Source: National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation/Private Research Donations
Funding Amount: $525,000

Description:
This project builds upon a previous alternative financing project to: (a) develop and implement a consumer and minority responsive infrastructure for the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation, (b) maintain the zero percent interest buydown for assistive technology devices and services, (c) develop and implement a comprehensive outreach and public awareness campaign to target underrepresented and culturally diverse communities, and (d) design and implement a comprehensive process and outcome evaluation system.



Utah Collaborative Medical Home Project Evaluation
Contact Person:
Richard Roberts, Diane Behl
Funding Source: Utah Department of Health
Funding Amount: $25,000

Description:
The goal of the Utah Collaborative Medical Home Project is to develop and implement a statewide system to support medical homes for children with special health care needs in primary care settings, emphasizing the provision of comprehensive, continuous, coordinated, culturally responsive, and family centered care.

Utah Early Intervention Project - Follow-Up
Contact Person:
Mark Innocenti
Funding Source: Utah Department of Education
Funding Amount: $70,003

Description:
The Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP) was originally funded through the Utah Departments of Education and Health, as a three-year multi-method, longitudinal study of the effects of early intervention for high-risk and developmentally disabled young children birth through age 5. Following completion of the original study, the Utah State Office of Education funded a follow-up study to continue to track children enrolled in the original study as they progressed through their academic career. This follow-up evaluation is currently in its sixth year. Children have been followed for a 9-year period. Funding occurs on a year-to-year basis. This evaluation is participatory in nature in that evaluation and USOE staff will collaborate to determine specific questions to be addressed each year. Evaluation data will continue to be collected on the children and families involved in the areas of: changes in classification, movement in and out of special education and other special services, service delivery patterns, extended school year placements, and parent perceptions of services. This new information will be used to examine current issues in service delivery as well as in analyses with extant data to better examine later impacts of early intervention.

The following objectives were identified for the 2002/03 year:
· Continue collection of longitudinal data as in past three years.
· Identify children who exit from special education; compare those who exit with those who remain in special education and determine:
- Are there differences on early scores or is continuing enrollment in special education related to program characteristics while in early intervention or after exiting early intervention?
- Are differences based on inclusion settings?
The effects of inclusion on classification and the interaction of child, family, and program will also be evaluated.

Utah Frontiers Project: A System of Care for Children and Youth with Serious
Emotional Disturbances

Contact Person:
Glenna Boyce
Funding Source: Utah Department of Health
Funding Amount: $276,756

Description:
The Utah State Division of Mental Health, with regional mental health divisions, is conducting a nationally funded project, the Utah Frontiers Project, to improve community-based mental health services for children with SED and their families in rural, frontier areas of the state. Kane, Garfield and Beaver counties were the first project areas (Cohort 1) in the state: Carbon, Emery, and Grand counties (Cohort 2) are also participating. This five year project started in October 1, 1998; it is one of approximately 43 projects across the nation funded by Child, Adolescent and Family Branch of the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS). A national evaluation of the projects has been mandated by Congress to learn how the projects are developed and how they help


children and families. Glenna C. Boyce and James F. Akers at the Early Intervention Research Institute conducted the Utah Frontiers evaluation in conjunction with Sherilin Rowley from Liaisons (LINCS). The goals of the study were to keep children at home, in school, and out of trouble in the community. The Utah evaluation involved four components: (1) a cross-sectional descriptive study, (2) child and family outcome study, (3) system-level assessment, and (4) services and cost study.

Utah Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Regional Program (ULEND)
Contact Person:
Judith Holt
Funding Source: University of Utah Subcontract
Funding Amount: $199,079

Description:
In March 2001, a partnership between the University of Utah Medical School and the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD) was awarded a five-year grant from the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health: the Utah Regional Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Program (ULEND). This was the only new program funded in the competition, and drew heavily on the newly established Interdisciplinary Training (IDT) program as a model. It will provide $1.5 million over five years to support interdisciplinary training between the two campuses with trainees in medical, health, and allied health professions. Each year appoximately 11 long-term ULEND leadership trainees will engage in 300 hours of interdisciplinary didactic, clinical, and research activities with emphasis placed on achieving core leadership competencies and objectives. Faculty from Utah State University's Center for Persons with Disabilities as well as the USU Departments of Psychology, Nutrition, Audiology, and Speech and Language Pathology contribute their knowledge and expertise to the ULEND program to enhance the trainees' interdisciplinary experience. To ensure that ULEND trainees strengthen and expand their leadership skills, four distinct and interrelated strands are articulated in the core competencies and objectives. The four strands are: (1) ULEND leadership trainees will articulate and apply a family-centered philosophy that guides their practice and reflects their vision and commitment to culturally-competent, community-based services and supports, and coordinated, integrated systems of care that are responsive to both best practices and emerging concerns and priorities in the health care field; (2) ULEND leadership trainees will expand their core knowledge in the areas of ND/RD, genetics, molecular research, current laws and regulations that impact children and youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their families, the structure of and funding streams for health care and human service systems, the process for advocacy, and the development of public policy; (3) ULEND leadership trainees will develop enhanced disciplinary skills as well as demonstrable skills in interdisciplinary practice including the provision of clinical services to children and youth with ND/RD and their families, and collaborative interactions with professionals and community service providers; and (4) ULEND leadership trainees will understand, direct and/or participate in research and evaluation activities that examine the impact of services and service systems from the individual, family, practitioner, community, state, and federal perspectives and will demonstrate the ability to support systems change initiatives.

Utah Legislative Coalition for Persons with Disabilities
Contact Person:
Sarah Rule, Judith Holt
Funding Source: DD Council
Funding Amount: $37,654

Description:
The Utah Legislative Coalition for People with Disabilities Project is supported by many disability organizations in Utah, including the CPD, the Governor's Council for People with Disabilities, the Disability Law Center, state disability service agencies, and consumer groups. The Coalition was organized in 1987 to provide leadership, training, coordination, and technical assistance to parents, advocates, and advocacy organizations about disability legislation. This training and technical assistance includes information about the Utah legislative process, how legislation becomes law, and how to work with legislators. The Coalition identifies legislation which will improve services and programs for citizens with disabilities and tracks these bills through the legislative session. Training and technical assistance on legislative issues and state appropriations are also provided to the legislature. Information generated by the various research and demonstration activities of the CPD is used as appropriate by Coalition members and the Utah State Legislature. This year, 15 students are expected to complete the endorsement.



 
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Utah Multi-Sensory Consortium: Statewide Preparation of Early Childhood Specialists and
K-12 Teachers

Contact Person:
Sarah Rule
Funding Source: University of Utah & Utah State University
Funding Amount: $63,552

Description:
A critical shortage of public school personnel qualified to serve children with sensory impairments affects Utah and the nation. This project supports students who wish to obtain endorsements to teach students with vision impairments and who are ages birth through 21 years. It is a collaborative effort between the University of Utah and Utah State University.


Utah Work Incentive Initiative (UWIN)
Contact Person:
Judith Holt
Funding Source: Utah Department of Health
Funding Amount: $135,000

Description:
The Utah Work Incentive Initiative (UWIN) is Utah's response to the 1999 "Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act" (TWIIA). This Act seeks to modernize the employment service system for people with disabilities so that they no longer have to choose between taking a job and having health care. The Utah Work Incentives Coalition (UWIC) was started in the summer of 2000 as the oversight body, with a strong consumer voice, to guide Utah's work incentive projects under TWIIA. The Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University is one of the major participants in UWIC along with several service providers, employment specialists, state agencies, and consumers. Currently, the Interdisciplinary (IDT) Division is involved with the Outreach Training and Awareness Work Group, one of five work groups established by UWIC. As part of the Outreach Training and Awareness Work Group, the CPD has been charged with designing and conducting a comprehensive training program to provide agency personnel, consumers, and other interested persons with timely, accurate, and relevant information pertaining to the five major interrelated components of the Work Incentive Initiatives: Medicaid Buy-In, Expanded Personal Assistance Services, Outreach and Planning, Advocacy and Legal Rights, and Ticket to Work.

Utah Work Incentive Initiative-Evaluation (UWIN-EVAL)
Contact Person:
Jefferson Sheen
Funding Source: Utah Department of Health
Funding Amount: $75,000

Description:
The Utah Work Incentive Initiative (UWIN) Evaluation effort is designed to conduct ongoing comprehensive process and outcome evaluations for all UWIN grant activities and programs. UWIN evaluators utilize a Participatory Action Research Model (PAR) for all UWIN evaluation projects.


WebAIM K-12: National Institute on Keeping Web Accessibility in Mind in K-12 Education
Contact Person:
Cyndi Rowland
Funding Source: OSEP
Funding Amount: $250,135

Description:
The Internet is one of the most powerful influences in our country, our society, and our education system today. However, students with disabilities are often denied access to the Internet because of Web sites' designs. There are increases in the educational materials placed on the Web in inaccessible formats. This includes curricula, assessments, homework, teacher feedback, as well as collaborative work from groups of student peers.This problem is appalling in the K-12 system.When students with disabilities cannot access curricular elements that are placed on the Web they are, in fact, denied access to the general curriculum. This flies in the face of legal requirements under IDEA regulations. As important, these students are denied their independence, dignity, and choice. No projects to date have acted upon the importance of system-change in the K-12 system to resolve this endemic problem. Unless coordination and reform can take place, students with disabilities will be at the mercy of their school district's sensitivity to Web accessibility and the extent to which the school can influence design practices. Another problem is the preparation of educators and support personnel (e.g., regular and special educators, instructional technology or curriculum specialists). The next generation of educators is not learning accessibility skills in their required technology courses. This may be, in part, because the faculty that teach them may not possess the subset of design skills necessary to teach accessible Web design. A curriculum on accessible design would help this faculty teach this important content.The goal of this 3-year Project of National Significance is to increase the accessibility of Web-based components of the general curriculum for students with disabilities. This will be accomplished in three ways.

First, the project staff will develop, implement, and evaluate a model of system-change for the K-12 system. The sets of procedural guidelines will be field-tested across three school districts. Second, project staff will develop, implement, and evaluate an accessibility curriculum to be used in required technology courses during preservice teacher training. The curriculum will be field-tested across four teacher-training programs. Third, an aggressive dissemination campaign will be launched.. A Research and Development model will be used throughout the design of this project. It relies heavily on formative data to provide directions for revisions. A summative phase will also be used to garner final outcome data. This data-heavy model will be appropriate for the ongoing needs of the project. Moreover, the project will rely heavily on the previous accessibility and higher education reform work of the project WebAIM as well as an advisory panel, who will help in development and review efforts. This panel is comprised of directors of two national centers dealing with accessibility, staff from one of the federal Regional Resource Centers, administrative staff from a school district, a consumer with a disability, and parents of a student with a disability. This panel will bring an important knowledge base and perspective to the development of the project.


Wyoming Technical Assistance for Assessment of Special Ed Monitoring
Contact Person:
John Copenhaver
Funding Source: Wyoming Department of Education
Funding Amount: $100,000

Description:
The MPRRC works in conjunction with Wyoming for the purpose of receiving and assembling information and data, and conducting a statewide assessment of the special education monitoring of districts within the State of Wyoming.

*These projects are funded from CPD funds, already accounted for under Program Development and Administration


Data compiled by Kelleen Smith