Mission Statement
From the Director
Division Directors
In Memory
Advisory Board
Council on Consumer Affairs
CPD Organization
Soruces of Funding 2001
Distribution of Funding 2001
Awards & Appointments
Proposals Submitted
Status of Funding
Courses & Practica
National Presentations
Student Support
Technical Assistance
Workshops & Regional Presentations
Consumer Services
Publications & Products
Project Directory
Project Descriptions
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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Mission Statement


As a member of the national network of University Centers forExcellence in Developmental Disabilities' Education, Research, and Services, the mission of the Center for Persons with Disabilities is consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 which mandates that Centers for Excellence shall:

... provide leadership, advise policymakers, and otherwise promote opportunities for individuals with disabilities to exercise self-determination, be independent, be productive, and be integrated and included in all facets of community life.

The Center will accomplish its mission through the provision of interdisciplinary training, exemplary services, technical assistance, research and evaluation, and dissemination of information. These Center activities will be in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other state and federal legislation pertinent to people with disabilities. To accomplish its statewide mission, faculty and staff of the Center will engage with consumers with disabilities and their family members, consumer organizations, and local and state agencies to address the quality of life throughout the lifespan by:

· Promoting self-determination and choice that fosters independence, inclusion, productivity, and full participation in community life;

· Promoting accessible environments;


· Promoting the identification and prevention of disabilities through education, research, and services;


· Providing advocacy, interdisciplinary training, exemplary services, and information;


· Conducting evaluation and applied research studies to systematically address questions about validity, accountability, cost-effectiveness, efficacy, and to determine unmet needs; and

· Providing technical assistance to help consumers, communities, and organizations provide high quality, effective, culturally competent, community-based supports.


It is our philosophy that in exercising self-determination, it is the consumer who should make decisions about how services and supports are organized and delivered. These should be community-based, culturally competent, supportable, and exportable.

To achieve our mission, the goals of specific projects will reflect strategies to affect systematic change within the University, community, and service systems. The Center pursues its mission consistent with that of Utah State University: "In all its endeavors, the University is committed to developing responsible citizens through freedom of inquiry and expression, and through its best efforts in teaching, research, creative arts, extension and services, and encouraging cultural diversity."

picture of a child and an adult signing together
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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
From the Director
photo of Dr. Sarah Rule

Dr. Sarah Rule,
CPD Director


Consistent with the continuing evolution in our society towards independence, inclusion, and self determination for individuals who live with disabilities, the year 2000-2001 brought significant changes to the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD). As a result of the passage of Public Law 106-402, the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000, the national network of university affiliated programs was renamed. Thus, the CPD is now, proudly, one of 63 University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities' Education, Research, and Services (UCEs).

On a sad note, we joined colleagues in the state and nation in mourning the death of Glenn Latham, who was instrumental in disseminating evidence-based interventions to schools and families nationally and internationally.

This Annual Report describes CPD activities that reflect our part in this societal evolution. The Center's core functions continue to include interdisciplinary preservice preparation and continuing education, community-based services, basic and applied research, and dissemination of information. To highlight just a few activities through which we addressed these functions:

· The Interdisciplinary Training Division launched its new program. Faculty and staff from 15 disciplines and 20 family members, consumers, and students from 9 departments and disciplines participated in seminars, clinical experiences and participatory action research.

· The Early Intervention Research Institute continued to address systems change through coordinated, culturally competent services at the state and national levels as well as in local communities in Utah and several other states;

· Staff members of the Up-to-3 program partnered with families and other University projects in conducting early intervention;

· The Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center continued technical assistance activities in 10 states and the BIA, and its innovative use of technology in management was commended in a federal site review;

· The Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support and the Reading for All Learners projects continued to study and promote early literacy;

· The FASTT Project and the Bear River Adult Skill Center engaged in family support by linking families, conducting training, and providing direct services;

· The Clinical Services program joined the national Children's SSI Project of the American Association of University-Affiliated Programs in its collaborative effort to provide interdisciplinary assessments for children who apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability payments;

· Advocacy efforts with and for consumers and family members expanded when the CPD became a partner in supporting the Utah Advocacy Project of the Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities;

· Biomedical research continued with expanded capacity to study the relationship between autism and the immune system; and

· The technology thrusts of the CPD advanced in continued exploration and training in the use of technology and assistive devices through projects and services such as Web Aim, the Utah Assistive Technology Program, and the K-SAR studios.

In its role as Utah's Center for Excellence, the CPD is fortunate to have partners that include consumers and families who live with disabilities, agency personnel, and organizations throughout the state. Through collaborative efforts with these partners, we can magnify our efforts to promote and support consumers' decision making and choice in the context of family, community, and culture. We are grateful to the CPD's Council on Consumer Affairs and Advisory Board members; the Dean and administrators of the College of Education and Utah State University; to our partner agencies, the Disability Law Center and the Governor's Council for People with Disabilities; and especially to the many consumers and family members who have advised, supported, and challenged us to grow further, faster, and forcefully.

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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Division Directors


photo of Richard Roberts
Richard N. Roberts, PhD
Research & Development

photo of Judith Holt
Judith Holt, PhD
Interdisciplinary Training

photo of John Copenhaver
John Copenhaver, ME
Technical Assistance

photo of Dennis Odell
J. Dennis Odell, MD
Biomedical

photo of Ron Torres
Ron Torres, MD
Biomedical

photo of Alan Hofmeister
Alan Hofmeister, PhD
Technology

photo of Richard Bear
Richard Baer, PhD
Outreach

photo of Nancy Yonk
Nancy Yonk
Business Office Manager

photo of Sharon Weston
Sharon Weston
Assistant to the Director

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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
In Memory
Dr. Glenn Latham
June 30, 1931 -- July 10, 2001

photo of Glenn Latham

Dr. Glenn Latham served as the Director of the Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center and the director of the technical assistance division at the CPD for over 20 years. At the time of his death, Latham was a professor emeritus of education at USU, and principle investigator for the MPRRC.

Dr. Latham first came to the CPD as director of the Division of Planning and Evaluation. He developed the Cooperative Extension Program for People with Disabilities, attracting both state and federal funding in a program that championed systematic program evaluation in education and human services throughout Utah and the western states.

In 1980, he wrote the proposal and was awarded the federal contract locating the Regional Resource Center (RRC) at the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD). Dr. Latham led this program, as well as the Regional Resource Center network, through many very challenging and difficult times. The Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC) is clearly the largest and longest running federal grant in CPD history. Dr. Latham was nationally recognized by colleagues in state agencies, RRCís, the Office of Special Education Programs, and among legislators as "Mr. Regional Resource Center" because of his hard work, his vision, and his leadership.

Dr. Latham taught numerous classes for the Department of Special Education. He helped develop the research and evaluation methodol-ogy program (REM) in the Department of Psychology and provided numerous workshops on campus, throughout the state, nationally and internationally, on systematic program evaluation. He served for a short time on Senator Orrin Hatch's staff, chaired his Advisory Committee on Disability Issues for a period of time, and was particularly active with national disability legislation.

One cannot travel anywhere in special education circles, particularly at the administrative level of state and national organizations, without hearing colleagues extol and give recognition to Dr. Latham's hard work, his effectiveness, and his leadership. In addition to directing the Regional Resource Center and teaching at the University, Glenn pursued his own professional interests -- research and the application of behavioral principles in child raising. Dr. Latham authored several books, workbooks, and study guides on positive parenting and became one of the best-known authorities in this field. During the last few years, he maintained an almost impossible schedule of writing, researching, lecturing and conducting workshops. Thousands of parents who have benefitted from Dr. Lathams workshops, presentations and lectures will miss his professional expertise.

Dr. Latham was a remarkable man, not only for what he accomplished and contributed but also for the kind, considerate and quiet way he was able to work with others. He made each of us feel valued and important. Glenn will always be remem-bered not only for what he did, but for the high standard of professional performance, dedication, and commitment that he set for all of us.

- Dr. Marvin Fifield

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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Advisory Board



University Representatives

Gerry R. Giordano, Chair

Dean, College of Education, USU

Brent Miller

Interim Vice-President for Research, USU

David Stein

Department Head, Psychology, USU

Charles Salzberg

Department Head Special Education, USU

James Blair

Department Head, Department of

Communicative Disorders, USU

Parent & Consumer Representatives

Beth Skidmore

Laurie Ballam

Marsha Rawlins

Gordon Richins

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE

Paul Vinck



EX OFFICIO

Gordon Richins

Consumer Liaison, CPD

DIVISION REPRESENTATIVES

Jack Rudio

Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center

Paul Wightman

Services Division

Rod Price

Utah Assistive Technology Project


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Council on Consumer Affairs



PARENT REPRESENTATIVES

Gilbert Duncan

Marsha Rawlins

PRIMARY CONSUMER REPRESENTATIVES

Helen Roth

Ron Mecham

Blake Savage

Becky Keeley

Jane Nielsen

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE

Paul Vinck



EX OFFICIO

Gordon Richins

Consumer Liaison, CPD

DIVISION REPRESENTATIVES

Jack Rudio

Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center

Paul Wightman

Services Division

Rod Price

Utah Assistive Technology Project


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001

CPD organization
July 1,2000 - June 30, 2001


diagram of CPD organization
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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Sources of Funding

Total Funding
July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2001

$13,671,932

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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Distribution of Funding

July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2001

pie chart

Funding for the CPD is generated primarily through external grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements from federal, state, and local government agencies. In the past 20 years, the total CPD budget has grown to over $13 million annually, contributing a large share to the USU College of Education's research budget. Recently, the USU College of Education was ranked fifth in the nation for the amount of externally funded research, and the CPD is proud to be part of this nationally acclaimed unit.


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Awards and Appointments

LISA BOYCE Solnit Fellowship, Zero to Three, 2001-2003

MARTIN BLAIR 2001 Disability Leadership Fellowship
American Association of University Affiliated Programs

MARVIN FIFIELD Distinguished Service Award
American Association of University Affiliated Programs
Education Award
American Association of Mental Retardation


BETH FOLEY TOP Professor Award, Mortar Board, USU

MARILYN HAMMOND Guest Editor, Intermountain Aging Review

MARK S. INNOCENTI Governor, Board of Directors, Division of Early Childhood, CEC
Editorial Board, Infants and Young Children
Editorial Board, Journal of Early Intervention
Consulting Editor, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education
Consulting Editor, National Head Start Association Dialog


JILL MORGAN Editorial Board, Remedial Education and Special Education
Editorial Board, The Teacher Educator
Editorial Board, Theories & Practices in Supervision & Curriculum


GORDON RICHINS Chair, Utah Statewide Independent Living Council

THOMAS RISK
ANNE MENDENHALL
TODD NEWMAN
JOHN JEON
JON WATKINS
National Silver Telly Award
A Man to Match His Mountain: The Story of Robert H. Stewart and His Efforts to Restore and Preserve the Wellsville Mountain
Logan School District

THOMAS RISK
ANNE MENDENHALL
TODD NEWMAN
JOHN JEON
JON WATKINS
MIKE LOGAN
National Silver Telly Award
Waiting and Watching for How My Friend Communicates
HOPE, Inc.

RICHARD N. ROBERTS Outstanding Achievement Award
American Association of University Affiliated Programs
Chair of Research Committee, Division for Early Childhood, CEC


CYNDI ROWLAND Web Editor
Division for Early Childhood, Council for Exceptional Children

SARAH RULE Board of Directors, AAUAP
Associate Editor, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education
Editorial Board, Journal of Early Intervention
Editorial Board, Education and Treatment of Children

SUE WHITWORTH
CHRIS WILKERSON
Direct Care Staff Award
Utah Consumer Council

SUE WATKINS
MARILYN HAMMOND
KEVON MILLER
BRENT GERITY
National Silver Telly Award
Ageis Award
Videographer Award
Child to Child Project

PAUL WIGHTMAN Resource of the Year Award
Cache Valley Association for the Education of Young Children,
National Association for the Education of Young Children

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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Proposals Submitted


P. I. TITLE SOURCE AMOUNT
Baer, R. Community-based family supports for Utah: A continuing systems change effort HHS/ADD $189,897
Baer, R.      
Baer, R. Bear River Activity and Skill Center continuation Utah Dept of Human Services $625,000
Baer, R. Estimator project continuation Utah Office of Education $50,998
Baer, R. Lincoln Center/summertime blues Lincoln Center $1,000
Behl, D. Early childhood community development technical Utah Dept. assistance of Health $31,000
Blair, M. Training initiative program/AAUAP HHS/ADD $94,516
Blair, M. Skill and competency-based training in assistive technology HHS/ADD $94,516
Blair, M. Assistive technology advocacy training IOTI $39,987
Blair, M. Utah Assistive Technology Program continuation NIDRR $370,276
Blair, M. Alternative financing program for assistive technology in Utah: Expand the Utah Assistive Technology Foundation NIDRR $500,000
Blanchard, C. Box Elder Birdseed Governorís Council $77,461
. Bohman, P.
Eastmond, N.
Starting with web accessibility in mind: A curriculum and faculty project FIPSE $135,797
Boyce, G.C. Utah Rural Frontier Childrenís Project Utah Div. of Mental Health $298,127
Boyce, G.C. InReach model program continuation OSEP $179,995
Boyce, G.C. InReach supplement/FICC outcomes OSEP $6,507
Boyce, G.C. InReach: Using technology to ensure effective transition from NICU Part C services OSERS $199,995
Boyce, G.C. A system to educate parents: Improving child find through increased parent knowledge OERI $189,960
Boyce, G.C. Stress and coping for adolescents with disabilities and ADHD identification in very low birthweight babies who experience intraventricular hemorrhage CPD $14,000
. Broadhead, C Willingness to pay for reducing health risks for children from air pollution: Evidence from Utah valley EPA $193,477
Broadhead, C.
Jump, V.
Evaluation of cost effectiveness and organizational structure of Marathon County Start Right Program State of Wisconsin $50,000
Crowley, S.
Rowland, C.
Bridging the gap: Training for cultural competence in mental health services FIPSE $235,700
Copenhaver, J. Regional Resource Center No. 5 continuation OSEP $1,178,833
Copenhaver, J. Special education monitoring-- BIA BIA/OIEP $267,295
Copenhaver, J. Elementary and middle schools technical assistance center American Institutes of Research $21,504
Copenhaver, J. Cost sharing/ technical assistance North Dakota State of North Dakota $17,096
Copenhaver, J. Cost sharing/ND alternate assessment process State of North Dakota $58,917
Copenhaver, J. Secondary education and technical assistance center USDOE/AED $110,000
Copenhaver, J. A study of funding education programs in Colorado for children with disabilities State of Colorado $50,000
Copenhaver, J.
Rudio, J.
Utah School for Deaf and Blind study Utah School Rudio, J. for Deaf & Blind $35,238
Fifield, M. Indian Children's Program HHS/IHS $691,281
Goetze, L. Evaluating the effects of financial resource management training for part C service coordinators and their families OSEP $174,781

A total of 78 proposals were submitted by CPD staff during fiscal year 2001 to a variety of federal, state and local government agencies, as well as private founda-tions. Topics covered a broad range, including distance education, web accessibility, biomedical research, technology, direct services, inservice and preservice training, assistive technology, technical assistance, adult services, and many others. Dick Baer and Judith Holt collaborating on a project

Goetze, L.
Broadhead, C.
Bridges in the lives of youth with disabilities: Community adjustment and transition outcomes OERI $293,950
Goetze, L.
Judd, D.
Family Find: Using the ages and stages questionnaire to build family-centered comprehensive child find systems OSEP $174,995
Goetze,
L. Broadhead, C.
Part C early intervention financing CPD $17,000
Hofmeister, A. Core science programs: Dissemination and effective implementation OSERS $147,890
Hofmeister, A. Multimedia inclusion project Utah Office of Education $27,000
Hofmeister, A. Paraeducation statewide staff development Utah Office of Education $307,190
Hofmeister, A. Preventing and treating failure in economically impacted rural Utah school districts Mineral Lease USU $35,318
Holt, J. Utah leadership education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Regional Program (ULEND) Univ. of Utah MCH $108,673
Holt, J. IDT professional staff CPD $7,000
Holt, J. Traumatic brain injury state demonstration grant program Univ. of Utah $22,766
Holt, J.
R. Roberts
ULEND Utah Interdisciplinary Training Program HHS/MCH $492,656
Innocenti, M.S.
Boyce, L.K.
Bilingual early language and literacy (BELLS) NICHD $407,250
Innocenti, M.S. Longitudinal evaluation project Utah Office of Education $39,000
Judd, D.
Broadhead, C.
Forgotten Families: Evaluation of a comprehensive model for children 0-2 with disabilities OSEP $178,438
Jump, V. Efffects of infant massage on atypically developing infants and their families OSEP $74,995
Jump, V. Infant massage for touch-deprived infants in Ecuadorian orphanages: A naturalistic intervention for infants and orphanage American Massage Therapy Association $20,000
Jump, V.
Innocenti, M.
The effectiveness of an infant massage training program in early intervention programs OSEP $172,684
Jump, V.
Roberts, R.
Effects of tactile-kinesthetic stimulation in the NICU NIH/HHS $307,958
Morgan,
J. Ashbaker, B.
Supervision: A model for the teacher's role as supervisor of paraprofessionals OSERS $167,706

an infant child Research aimed at improving the lives of persons with disabilities and their families is a major thrust of the CPD. The Early Intervention Research Institute, operated through the Research and Evaluation Division, originally set out to investigate and evaluate the efficacy of various early inteventions. Over the years, however, the mission of EIRI has expanded greatly .
Currently, EIRI operates 15 projects focusing on new interventions, providing technical assistance, and facilitating the development of systems of service. A multidisciplinary staff from the fields of Psychology, Family and Hu-man Development, Special Education, Occupational and Physical Therapy, Eco-nomics, and Business conduct studies across the nation addressing both applied and theoretical issues. EIRI also sponsors a mini-conference each year at USU to dis-seminate their findings and provide a forum for others in the field.
Visitors at a disability related conference

Odell, J.D.
Torres, R.
MHC associated abnormalities in autism continuation University of Utah $143,091
Odell, J.D.
Torres, R.
Faulty immune regulation in autism continuation HHS/NIH $139,000
Olsen, S. Service coordination support CPD $18,000
Risk. T.
Allsop, L.
Stepping stones phase II OSERS $200,000
Roberts, R. Monitoring and measuring community-based integrated systems of care MCH $199,998
Roberts, R. Opening doors in rural communities continuation HHS/MCH $249,999
Roberts, R. GPRA indicators HHS/MCH $24,900
Roberts, R. Early childhood development and education for Medicaid children Utah Dept. $5,000
Roberts, R. Opening Utah's doors MCH $149,998
Roberts, R. Promoting HOPE for Utah Children Utah Dept.of Health $5,000
Roberts, R. An outcomes-based approach to evaluating service coordination models OSEP $179,999
Rowland, C. FIPSE project continuation FIPSE $82,496
Rowland, C. Accessibility to learning environments: Learning anytime, anywhere continuation FIPSE $262,112
Rowland, C. Collaborative early childhood special education program stipend supplement Utah Office of Education $30,000
Rowland, C. WebAIM: Keeping web accessibility in mind CPD $10,110
Rowland, C. Collaborative early childhood special education program USOE $158,973
Rowland, C.
Crowley, S.
Bridging the gap: Training for cultural competence in mental health services FIPSE $223,503
Rowland, C.
Crowley, S.
Training for Utah's school counselors: Applied problem- solving in distance education learning communities Community/University Research Initiative $32,698
Rule, S. Core administration HHS/ACYF $347,000
Rule, S. A collaborative program to prepare early intervention and early childhood special education personnel continuation OSERS $109,646
Rule, S. Utah multi-univeristy consortium: Statewide preparation of early childhood specialists and K-12 teachers in sensory impairments University of Utah $129,905
Rule, S. Professional policy development services AAUAP $54,983
Rule, S.
Cook, R
SPIES outreach: Curriculum and internet support for use of naturalistic intervention strategies continuation OSERS $146,919
Family and child development program Striefel, S. Utah Dept.of Health $732,899
Torres, R. HLA microsatellite alleles in autism CPD $10,000
Torres, R. Confirmation of association of HLA-DR4 and C4B alleles Cure Autism Now (CAN) $70,000
Torres, R. MMR vaccine in autism HHS/PSH $347,500


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Status of Funding

Total Proposal Amount Submitted
Fiscal Year 2001
$13,650,142
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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Courses & Practica

DEPT. &
COURSE #
TITLE INSTRUCTOR NO. OF
STUDENTS
TOTAL
CREDITS
SPECIAL EDUCATION
7970 Dissertation Rule 1 3
6790 Supervising and teaming with paraeducators in the provision of effective management strategies Likins 16 32
6790 Supervision for teachers and paraeducators (graduate)* Morgan
Ashbaker
29 58
6790 Orientation to teaching students with mild/ moderate disabilities Andrews
Likins
61 122
6550 Field-based practicum mild/moderate students Likins 61 61
6500 Interdisciplinary practices* Holt
Morgan
17 51
6560 Teaching students with mild/moderate disabilities Likins
Dyke
61 183
6030 Clinical teaching* Deer
Likins
64 195
5820 Preschool practicum for young children with disabilities in community environments* Deer 27 134
5790 Supervision for teachers and paraeducators (undergraduate)* Morgan
Ashbaker
35 70
5790 Utah law institute Rudio 129 129
5790 BIA law institute Ball 104 104
5790 Teaching students with mild/moderate disabilties II Likins 63 189
5730 Intervention strategies for young children w/disabilities Fiechtl 14 42
5710 Teaching infants and young children with disabilities Deer
Fiechtl
19 57
5810 Practicum with infants and families Fiechtl 9 36
5530 Assistive and adaptive technology for young children Deer 19 38
5530 Assistive and adaptive technology for education Blair 28 56
5310 Teaching reading and language arts  Likins 61 244
4000 Education of exceptional individuals  Morgan 77 154
2010 Effective practices for paraeducators  Likins 50 100
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS
5900 Fundamentals of assistive technology Henningsen
Foley
27 81
FAMILY & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
6020 Survey of human development research Jump 6 18
3510 Infancy/early childhood* Boyce 82 246
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
6250 Instructional design theory Olson 16 54
5210 Digital audio and video* Risk 37 111
PHSYCHOLOGY
7350 School psychology practicum Truhn 7 21
3660 Educational psychology Ehrlick 100 300

students participating in a class at the CPD In the fiscal year 2001, CPD staff members taught 34 courses in five different departments. Credits generated totalled 2,889, and 1,220 students participated in the courses, including some who received instruction via distance education.

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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
National Presentations


Akers, A. & Boyce, G.C. (2000, August). Initiating early intervention in the NICU: Focusing on parent-infant relationship. International Association of the Scientific Studies of Intellectual Disabilities, Seattle, WA.


Akers, A. & Behl, D. (2000, August). Integrating community services using participatory action research. American Association of University Affiliated Programs & International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability, Seattle, WA.


Akers, A., Bernstein, V., Campbell, S., Glikerson, L., Cardone, I. & Wechsler, N. (2000, November). Strengths-based approaches to working with infants and families. Zero to Three National Training Instiute, Washington, DC.


Akers, J.F., Akers, A.L., Boyce, G.C. & Innocenti, M.S. (2000, December). Developing positive parent-child interaction during home visits. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Akers, A., Boyce, G.C. & Browne, J. (2000, December). Initiating early intervention services for high-risk infants in the NICU. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Ashbaker, B.Y. & Morgan, J. (2000, July). An international perspective: Shared responsibilities. First UK Conference for Learning Support Assistants, Worcester, UK.


Ashbaker, B., Morgan, J. & Bartholomew, G. (2001, May). Insights into the role of the administrator in relation to the employment, training, and supervision of paraprofessionals. National Resource Center for Paraprofessionals, Madison, WI.


Ashbaker, B.Y., Morgan, J. & Mitchem, K. (2001, March). Paraprofessional staff in education settings: Issues relating to their employment, training and supervison as they impact teacher education. AACTE Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX.


Behl, D., Akers, A. L. & Roberts, R.N. (2000, December). Partnering with state children's special health care needs programs to improve early intervention systems of care. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Behl, D., Akers, A. & Roberts, R.N. (2000, August). Opening doors into rural communities. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Development, Seattle, WA.


Behl, D., Price, L., O'Brien, S.A. & Forsman, I. (2001, March). Monitoring and measuring integrated systems of care. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.


Bohman, P. (2000, October). Universal design and disability access to the web. WebNet 2000, San Antonio, TX.


Bohman, P. (2000, November). Overview of web accessibility; Training course authors in accessibility. Blackboard, Inc., Washington, DC.


Boyce, G.C. & Dyches, T. (2000, November). Using qualitative methods to gain information from youth who have disabilities. National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN.



Boyce, L.K., Cook, G. & Roggman, L.A. (2000, July). The role of maternal characteristics in the effective implementation of an Early Head Start home visiting program. International Conference on Infant Studies, Brighton, England.


Boyce, G.C., Akers, A., Boyce, L.K., Cook, G. & Wallis, R. (2000, July). InReach: A model to support parent-infant interaction through the transition from NICU to home and early intervention. Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services Project Director's Meeting, Washington, DC.


Boyce, G.C., Akers, A., Boyce, L.K. & Cook, G. (2000, December). InReach: A program of continuing care serving extremely low birthweight babies and their families. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Boyce, G.C., Akers, J., Rowley, S. & Williams, M.A. (2001, May). Using individual assessment data to guide and monitor services. Children's Mental Health Services: The Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico.


Bruder, M.B., Roberts, R.N., Trivette, C.M., McLean, M., Moylan, A., Heehan, T., Dunst, C.J., Raab, M. & Humphries, T. (2000, December). Comparative study of natural learning environment interventions. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Cook, G., Boyce, L., Boyce, G.C. & Akers, A. (2000, December). A day in the life of premature babies and their mothers. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Cook, R.S. & Rule, S. (2001, March). When face to face won't work: Internet-based focus groups. American Council on Rural Special Education, San Diego, CA.


Copenhaver, J. (2000, July). Charter school planning meeting. U.S. Department of Education, Washington.


Fifield, M., Rule, S., Richins, G. & Holt, J. (2000, August). Center for Persons with Disabilities: Partnerships in training and supports. American Association of University Affiliated Programs & International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability, Seattle, WA.


Fiechtl, B. & Rule, S. (2000, November). Issues for instructors: The web in course delivery and support. Teacher Education Division 2000, Las Vegas, NV.


Fire, N.,Cook, R.S., Ward, C, Squires, J. & Harrison, H. (2001). Achieving the outcomes you want from a distance. OSEP and NECTAS National Meeting, Washington, DC.


Goetze, L.D. (2000, July). Taking data home: Finance information you can use. Annual Part C Data Systems Meeting, Washington, DC.


Goetze, L., Broadhead, C., Judd, D. & Jump, V.K. (2000, July). Do IFSP services reflect the needs of the family% International Conference on Infant Studies, Brighton, England.


Goetze, L.D. (2001, February). Issues and models of financing Part C services. Part C Coordinators' Meeting, Washington, DC.



Goetze, L.D. & Saunders, S. (2001, March). The Catch-22 in early intervention. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.


Innocenti, M.S., Akers, J.F., Akers, A. & Boyce, G.C. (2000, July). Issues in implementing a relationship-based home visiting program: The mutual competence model. International Conference on Infant Studies, Brighton, England.


Innocenti, M.S. (2000, August). Conducting research from an interdisciplinary perspective: Moving beyond the professional community. American Association of University Affiliated Programs & International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability, Seattle, WA.



Innocenti, M.S., Roberts, R.N., Baer, R. & Striefel, S. (2000, August). Center for Persons with Disabilities: Partnerships with families. American Association of University Affiliated Programs & International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability, Seattle, WA.


Innocenti, M.S., Roberts, R.N. & Goetze, L. (2000, August). A longitudinal study of early intervention in Utah. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities, Seattle, WA.


Innocenti, M.S. (2000, November). A blueprint for partnering with families. Training Institute of Early Head Start, Allentown, PA.


Innocenti, M.S. & Walker, P. (2000, December). A blueprint for infusing relationship-based approaches into home visiting programs. Zero to Three National Training Institute, Washington, DC.


Innocenti, M.S. (2000, December). Reaching out is hard to do: Considerations on a model of mutual competence. Zero to Three National Training Institute, Washington, DC.


Innocenti, M.S. (2000, December). Considerations on a model of mutual competence. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Innocenti, M.S. & Boyce, L.K. (2001, February). Bilingual early language and literacy support project. National Association for Bilingual Education, Phoenix, AZ.


Jump, V.K. (2000, July). Infant massage and attachment: Are the two related% Touch Research Symposium, Brighton, England.


Mitchem, K.J., Young, K.R., West, R.P. & Morgan, J. (2000, July). Self-managment strategies to promote inclusion. International Special Education Congress, Manchester, UK.


Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B. (2001, May). The paraeducator database. National Resource Center for Paraprofessionals Annual Conference, Madison, WI.


Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B. (2000, December). Effective staff development models for paraeducators and their supervising teachers. National Staff Development Council, Atlanta, GA.


O'Leary, E. (2001, April). Achieving results: Meeting the transition services requirements of IDEA '97. Comprehensive Systems of Personnel Development, Alexandria, VA.


O'Leary, E. (2001, April). Achieving results: Meeting the transition services requirements of IDEA '97. Council for Exceptional Children, Kansas City, MO.


O'Leary, E. (2001, January). Transition. Aspire/Illiad IDEA Partnership's First Annual Cadre Institute, Arlington, VA.


O'Leary, E. (2001, June). Addressing provisions of secondary transition on IEP. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Indian Education Programs, Minneapolis, MN.


Powell, G., Lamb-Parker, F. & Innocenti, M.S. (2000, December). Head Start as the National Laboratory for Early Childhood. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


ksar staff members, Tom and Todd.
K-SAR video productions is an award-winning multimedia production unit located at the CPD. Technical staff offer a variety of services, including video teleconferencing for distance education, video-on demand, and complete video production and editing services.
K-SAR is at the forefront of the latest DVD technology, a rapidly expanding field being extensively utilized in education. Additionally, K-SAR technology provides en-hanced Internet Web conferencing and streaming media for informa-tion sharing, training, learning, and networking. Video conferencing with multiple sites and two-way audio and video is another cutting-edge technology available through K-SAR.
K-SAR is recognized nationally for their commit-ment to quality and their use of the latest technol-ogy. Last year, K-SAR Productions won two Na-tional Silver Telly Awards, the highest honor be-stowed by a top industry national recognition program honoring achievment in film and video production. Over 11,000 entries were submitted in the competition, and only 7 percent received the Silver Telly.
a telly award


Richins, G. (2000, August). Employment of people with disabilities: Past, present, future. American Association of University Affiliated Programs & International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability, Seattle, WA.


Risk, T. & Alsop, L. (2000, October). SPARKLE. Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Washington, DC.


Roberts, R.N. (2000, July). Measuring the success of community-based efforts. Communities Can: A National Coalition, Santa Fe, NM.


Roberts, R.N. (2000, July). Logical and rational linkages between background, service systems and outcome variables in home visiting programs for children and families. XII Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Brighton, UK.


Roberts, R.N. (2000, August). Early intervention within a system of care for families with young children. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities Conference, Seattle, WA.


Roberts, R.N., Akers, A.L. & Behl, D. (2000, September). Participatory action research (PAR) models in early intervention for children with disabilities and their families. III European Conference on Community Psychology, Bergen, Norway.


Roberts, R.N., Behl, D., Akers, A. & Judd, D. (2001, March). Monitoring and measuring community-based integrated systems of care for CSHCN. Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, Washington, DC.


Roberts, R.N. (2001, May). Services are organized in ways that families can use them. Institute for Leaders in State Title V CSHCN Programs, Arlington, VA.


Roggman, L.A., Boyce, L.K. & Cook, G. (2000, July). Evaluating home visits: A collaborative methodology. International Conference on Infant Studies, Brighton, England.


Roggman, L.A. & Boyce, L.K. (2000, July). A local look at 24 months of fatherhood. International Conference on Infant Studies, Brighton, England.


Rowland, C. & Bohman, P. (2000, August). Partnerships in technology: Design of the CPD web site connects staff and consumers. American Association of University Affiliated Programs & International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability, Seattle, WA.


Rowland, C. & Crowley, S. (2000, August). Teaching psychotherapy skills: Use of a multimedia web-tool. American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.


Rowland, C. (2000, October). Accessibility of the internet in postsecondary education: Meeting the challenge. Universal Web Accessibility Symposium, San Antonio, TX.


Rowland, C. & Johnson, P. (2000, November). Are you ready for ALL learners% Designing an accessible architecture to sustain online learning. Asynchronous Learning Networks, Adelphi, MD.


Rowland, C., Bohman, C., Isam, J. & Andersen, S. (2000, November). Keys to accessibility. Department of Education Project Directors Meeting, San Diego, CA.



Rowland, C., Deer, M., & Fiechtl, B. (2000, December). Early childhood in this millenium: The use of videoconferencing to supervise personnel. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Rowland, C. & Rule, S. (2000, December).Technology: Everyone's doing it, should I% Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Rowland, C. (2001, March). Keeping web accessibility in mind: Project WebAim helps postsecondary education. International Technology for Persons with Disabilities Conference, Los Angeles, CA.


Rule, S. (2000, July). Inclusion for preschool children: Intervention in everyday settings. International Special Education Congress 2000, Manchester, UK.


Rule, S. (2000, August). Strategies for intervention in everyday settings: A curriculum to teach caregivers to intervene with young children. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Development, Seattle, WA.


Rule, S., Cook, R., Mariger, H. & Lancelot, B. (2000, November). Intervention in natural settings: What do we do on Monday morning% Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Striefel, S. (2000, July). Professional conduct and cognitive interventions in biofeedback and neurotherapy. Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Denver.


Striefel, S. & Braegger, T. (2000, August). Community-family partnership. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Development, Seattle, WA.


Striefel, S. & Braegger, T. (2000, August). Prevention with young children living in poverty. International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities Conference, Seattle, WA.


Striefel, S. (2000, September). Professional conduct and adjunctive techniques in neurofeedback. Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, San Diego, CA.


Striefel, S. (2001, March). Introduction to autogenic training; Professional issues; and Advances in realtime telebiofeedback internet applications. Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Raleigh, NC.


Torres, A. (2001, May). Disequilibrium test suggests that HLDA-DR4 is linked in autism spectrum disorder. Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism, New Haven, CT.


Youcha, V., Stockmeyer, A. M., Innocenti, M.S. & Browne, J.V. (2000, December). Leaders for the 21st Century. Division for Early Childhood International Early Childhood Conference, Albuquerque, NM.


Winn, C.A. (2001, June). Early intervention specialists for up to age 3 early intervention. Association for Protection of Rights and Services for Persons with Disabilities, Puerto Rico.



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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Student Support


TEACHING
CPD Interdisciplinary Training Stipends 21
University Courses Taught by CPD Staff  
· Number of Courses 34
· Number of Departments 5
·Student Credit Hours Generated 2,889
·Number of Students 1,220
Interdisciplinary Training Program in Assistive Technology  
· Undergraduate 27
Project Stipends  
· Undergraduate/Certification 27
· Distance Student Advisement 31
· Practicum/Clinical Experience 61


GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISEMENT
Doctoral committees chaired by CPD staff 4
Doctoral committees served by CPD staff 14
Masters committees chaired by CPD staff 5
Masters committees served by CPD staff 10
   


STUDENT SUPPORT
Graduate Assistantships 21
Student Employees 91
Other Student Support 19

Numerous training and education programs offered through the CPD are aimed at preparing professionals and para-professionals to work in the field of developmental disabilities at levels ranging from leadership to direct service. The Interdisciplinary Training Division provides opportunities for students from a wide variety of disciplines to increase their awareness, knowledge and skills by working as part of an interdisciplinary team. Last year, 21 trainees participated in the IDT program, all developing an Individualized Training Plan addressing core competencies and objectives in didactic, clinical and research settings. Working with faculty mentors, trainees provided services and supports to children and adults with disabilities and their families. Students, consumers, and family members of children with disabilities all participated in activities designed to increase awareness of the contributions various disciplines can make in a team effort. With the growing trend towards collaborative interdisciplinary efforts in the workplace, there is an increased need for service providers with strong, well-developed interdisciplinary teamwork skills, and the IDT program is helping to produce professionals equipped with these skills. CPD media disablility specialist Saachin helps a student.
trainee playing with a child
a faculty member and a trainee working together


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Technical Support

TOPIC HOURS
Administration 63
Aging 31
Assistive Technology 3
Child Care 75
Cultural Awareness 2
Diagnosis/Evaluation 58
Disability Information 3
Early Intervention 280
Families/Parenting 50
Grant Writing Methodology 8
HeadStart 5
Health Care 500
Inclusive Education 70
Information Referral 400
Intervention 812
Leadership 182
Legal Rights 44
Mental Health 93
Positive Behavior Management 68
Prevention 2,546
Public Policy 712
Research 34
Transition 360
Other 2,242 
TOTAL 8,641 


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Workshops & Regional Presentations


TOPIC HOURS
Administration 3
Aging 27
Assistive Technology 28
Case Management 2
Community Inclusion 6
Disability Information 12
Early Intervention 52
Employment-Related 2
Ethical Issues 38
Families/Parenting 26
HeadStart 2
Health Care 2
Human Growth & Development 2
Information Referral 44
Intervention 26
Leadership 19
Legal Rights 8
Mental Health 29
Prevention 3
Public Policy 1
Research 7
Other 160
TOTAL HOURS
TOTAL PARTICIPANTS
499
14,615


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Consumer Services


SERVICES TO CONSUMERS & FAMILIES HOURS
Interdisciplinary Treatment/Evaluation 238
Specialty/Medical Clinics 315
Consumers Served in Support Projects 5,027
TOTAL SERVED 5,580

 a child in a wheelchair playing with a trainee   Many types of direct ser vices are offered through the CPD. Model and demonstration programs operate within the community, offering assessments, implementation of individualized service plans, specialty clinics, family services, neurotherapy, and inclusionary and transition services.

Direct services are available to all ages. Therapies and interventions are offered for children birth to age three in the Up to Three Program. Daily living, functional, academic, and prevocational services are available for adults with disabilities through the Bear River Activity and Skill Center, as well as employment-related assistance for adults living with dis-abilities. The Utah Assisitive Technology Program works to expand availability of assistive technology devices and services for consumers throughout Utah, and other CPD programs deal with nutrition, child care, medical services and family support services. The major goal of all services is to improve the quality of life for consumers and their families.


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Publications & Products


BOOKS AND CHAPTERS IN BOOKS

Begay, R. C., Matheson, C., Weisner, T. S. & Roberts, R. N. (2000). Indigenous and informal systems of support: Navajo families who have children with disabilities. In C. S. Bos & T. V. Fletcher (Eds.), Helping Individuals with Disabilities and Their Families: Mexican and U.S. Perspectives (pp. 79-94). Bilingual Press, Hispanic Research Center: Arizona State University.


Bernstein, V.J. & Akers, A.L. (2000). Caring for the caregivers: Supporting the well-being of at-risk parents and children through supporting the well-being of the programs that serve them. In J. Hughes, J. Close and A. L Creca (Eds.), Handbook of Psychological Services for Children and Adolescents. New York: Oxford University Press.


Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B.Y. (2001). A teacher's guide to working with paraeducators and other classroom aides. Baltimore, MD: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development..


Roggman, L.A., Boyce, L.B. & Newland, L. (2000). Assessing mother-infant interaction in play. In C.E. Schaefer, K. Gitlin-Weiner & A. Sandgrund, (Eds.), Play Diagnosis and Assessment, Second Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons.


Rowland, C. (2000). Accessibility of the internet in postsecondary education: Meeting the challenge (Chapter 4). In French, Baker, & Johnson (Eds.) Universal Web Accessibility. San Marcos, TX: Texas Longterm Care Institute Publishers, Southwest Texas State University.


Striefel, S. (2001). Ethics and risk management. In B. Kall, J. Kamiya & G. Schwartz (Eds.), Applied Neurophysiology and Brain Biofeedback. Trevose, PA:Futurehealth.


Williams, J. M. & O'Leary, E. (2000). Transition: What we've learned and where we go from here. In Johnson, D.R. & Emmanuel, E. J. (Eds.), Issues Influencing the Future of Transition Programs and Services in the United States: A Collection of Articles by Leading Researchers in Secondary Special Education and Transition Services for Students with Disabilities (pp.49-66). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration, National Transition Network.


REFEREED ARTICLES

Agran, M., Blanchard, C., Wehmeyer, M. L. & Hughes, C. (2000). Promoting transition goals and self-determination through student-directed learning: The self-determined learning model of instruction. Education and Training in Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities.


Allred, D.M., Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B.Y. (2000). Available but not accessed: Resources to enhance paraeducators' skills and knowledge. Theories and Practices in Supervision and Curriculum, XI, 68-73.


Gage, J.D. & Wilson, L.J. (2000). Acceptability of interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A comparison of parents. Journal of Attention Disorders, 4(3), 174-182.


Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B. (2Y.000). Supporting new teachers: Practical suggestions for experienced staff. The Rural Educator, 22 (1), 35-37.


Morgan, J. & Ashbaker, B.Y. (2000). Providing training for paraeducators: What motivates them to attend? The Researcher, 15(1), 50-55.


Roggman, L.A., Benson, B. & Boyce, L.B. (1999). Fathers with infants: Knowledge and involvement in relation to psychosocial functioning and religion. Infant Mental Health Journal, 20, 257-277.


Roggman, L. A., Boyce, L. K., Cook, G. A. & Jump, V. K. (2001). Inside home visits: A collaborative look at process and quality. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 16, 53-71.


Saylor, C. F., Boyce, G. C., Peagler, S. M. & Callahan, S. A. (2000). Brief report: Cautions against using the Stanford-Binet-IV to classify high-risk preschoolers. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 25(3), 179-183.


Smith, T.B., Oliver, M.N.I., Boyce, G.C. & Innocenti, M.S. (2000). Effects of mothers' locus of control for child improvement in a developmentally delayed sample. The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 161(3), 307-313.


Smith, T.B., Oliver, M.N.I. & Innocenti, M.S. (2001). Parenting stress in families of children with disabilities. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 71, 257-261.


Striefel, S. (2001). Beyond the declaration of Helsinki. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 26(1), 39-59.


Striefel, S. (2001). The role of aspirational ethics and licensing laws in the practice of neurofeedback. Journal of Neurofeedback, 4(1), 43-55.



Wang, S., Foote, W.C., Sutton, D.L., Maciulis, A., Miller, J.M., Evans, R.C., Holyoak, G.R., Call, J.W., Buch, T.D., Taylor, W.D. & Marshall, M.R. (2001). Preventing experimental vertical transmission of scrapie by embryo transfer. Theriogeneology, 56(2), 315-327.


Williams, J.M. & O'Leary, E. (2001). What we've learned and where we go from here. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 24(1), 3-23.



Dissemination of information occurs in virtually all projects operated by the CPD, consistent with the purpose of University Centers for Excellence. The Outreach Division serves as the major dissemination unit of the Center. Descriptions of activities and products are circulated through newsletters to thousands of professionals, consumers, and families. A print and on-line electronic catalog of products in a wide variety of areas is available. In addition, the Family Resource Library loans materials to over 100 families of children with disabilities annually. These activities, in addition to the CPD website, located at www.cpd.usu.edu, provide information in specific substantive areas of expertise that can be widely accessed and utilized.  people looking through shelves of library resource material


NONREFEREED ARTICLES

Ashbaker, B.Y. & Morgan, J. (2001). Growing roles for teachers' aides. The Education Digest, 66 (7), 60-64.


Ashbaker, B.Y., . Morgan, J. (2001). Paraeducators: A powerful human resource. Streamlined Seminar, 19 (2), 1-4.


Ashbaker, B.Y. & Morgan, J. (2000). Bilingual paraeducators: What we can learn from Rosa. NASSP Bulletin, 84(614), 53-56.


Baer, R.D., Brown, G., Carleson, V., Franco, F., Griffin, M., Keene, R., Loveless, T., Sanderson, H., Sheld, D. & Tulbert, B. (2001). Commonly asked questions about estimator and Utah's severe discepancy formula. The Utah Special Educator, 21(6), p. 20.


Blair, M. (2001). Utah assistive technology program celebrates its twelfth birthday. CPD News, 24(1), pp. 1-3.


Blanchard, C. (2000). Family alliances for supports today and tomorrow. CPD News, 23(4), 5-8.


Cook, R. S. & Rule, S. (2001). When face-to-face won't work: Internet-based focus groups. American Council on Rural Special Education 2001 Conference Proceedings, 269-274. Kansas State University: ACRES


Innocenti, M.S., McEvoy, M.Shahmoon, Shanok, R. & Klujsza, V. (2000). Challenging behaviors: Looking for the silver bullet. NHSA Dialog, 4, 31-52.


Morgan, J., & Ashbaker, B.Y. (2001). Twenty ways to work more effectively with your paraeducator. Intervention in School and Clinic, 36(4), 230-231.


Morgan, J. (2000). Paraeducators: Finding out what we already know. Para-Aces (Montana Paraeducator Newsletter), 2(1), 8-9.


Morgan, J. Ashbaker, B.Y. & Forbush, D. (2000). Special helpers: Paraeducators share the tasks in special education classrooms. American School Board Journal, 187(9), 54-56.


Hammond, M. (2000). Tech around the house. Exceptional Parent, (6), 48-53.


Innocenti, M.S., McEvoy, M., Shahmoon-Shanok, R. & Klujsza, V. (2000). Challenging behaviors: Looking for the silver bullet. NHSA Dialog, 4, 31-52.


Rule, S. (2000). Inclusion for preschool children: Intervention in everyday settings. (Abstract). In Book of Abstracts, International Special Education Congress 2000. Manchester, United Kingdom: The University of Manchester, School of Education, Centre for Educational Needs, Oxford.



Rule, S. (2000). Strategies for intervention in everyday settings: A curriculum to teach caregivers to intervene with young children. (Abstract). In Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 44(parts 3 & 4), p. 447.


Striefel, S. (2001, Summer). Emerging ethical issues in primary care. Biofeedback, 29(2).


Striefel, S. (2001, Spring). ethical dimensions of the pursuit of optimal functioning. Biofeedback, 29(1), 4-6.


Striefel, S. (2000, Winter). Some core ethical principles and their application. Biofeedback, 28(4), 4-5.


Striefel, S. (2000, Fall). Professional boundary issues in neurofeedback and other biofeedback. Biofeedback, 28(3), 5-6.


Warren, L. (2001). An update on autism spectrum disorders. CPD News, 24(1), pp. 4-8.





OTHER

Akers, A.L., Dunn, D., Schade-Evans, A. & Desisto, N. (2000). The Vickery: A community guide for coordinating the medical home and early intervention. Family Health Resource Center, Augusta, ME.


Ashbaker, B.Y., & Morgan, J. (2001). Teamwork and Self-Evaluation for Teachers and Paraeducators. Facilitator Manual. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University.


Baer, R. (2001). Integration and deveopment of community-based family supports for Utah: Final report. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University.


Baer, R. (2000). Estimator-NJ (manual and software). Logan, UT: DB Enterprises.


Blanchard, C., Kulp, G., Post, H. & Baer, R. D. (2001). Action Team Training. Logan, UT: Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University.

Boyce, G. C. (2000). Parent-Child Interaction Systems: A Long Term Evaluation of Children with Disabilities and Their Mothers. A Final Report to the U.S. Deptartment of Education. Early Intervention Research Institute, Utah State University, Logan, UT.

Copenhaver, J. (2001). Guidelines for Serving Children with Special Health Care Needs. Kansas Department of Education, Topeka, KS.


Copenhaver, J. (2001). Wyoming Guidelines on the Provision of Extended School Year Services. Wyoming Department of Education, Cheyenne, WY.


Copenhaver, J. (2001). Wyoming Guidelines on Assistive Technology for Educators and Administrators. Wyoming Department of Education, Cheyenne, WY.


Copenhaver, J. (2000). Bureau of Indian Affairs-Continuous Improvement Monitoring Process. Albuquerque, NM.


Fifield, M.G. (Ed.). (2001). Summary Report: Indian Children's Program. Logan, UT: Utah State University, Center for Persons with Disabilities.


Hansen, K. (2000). Individual family service plan process. In At Home and At Daycare Training Manual.


Hammond, M. (2000). Under one roof. Herald Journal, pp. 9,12.


Hammond, M. (2000). Helping students with visual impairments. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Helping students with learning disabilities. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Helping students with mobility/physical impairments. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Helping students with auditory/hearing impairments. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Students and assistive technology: Helpful hints for parents and consumers. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Toys for children with disabilities. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Internet resources for parents and families. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Utah disability resources. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Transition planning for success in adult life. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M. (2000). Selecting and obtaining assistive technology. Utah State University: Logan, Utah.


Hammond, M., Miller, K. & Gerity, B. (2001). Waiting and watching for how my friend communicates. (videotape). Logan, Utah: Hope, Inc.


Hammond, M., Miller, K. & Gerity, B. (2001). Taking turns and not just telling my friend what to do. (videotape). Logan, Utah: Hope, Inc.


Merritt, D. (2000). Family and Child Development Program Newsletter. Center for Persons with Disabilities: Logan, UT.


Merritt, D. (2001). Family and Child Development Program Newsletter. Center for Persons with Disabilities: Logan, UT.


Morgan, J., & Ashbaker, B.Y. (2000). Teacher training in relation to working with and supervising learning support assistants: A survey of institutes of higher education in the UK. British Education Index: Education-line (On-line database).


Rudio, J. (2000). The Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind Investigative Report. Center for Persons with Disabilities: Logan, UT.


Storms, J., O'Leary, E., & Williams, J. (2000). The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 transition requirements: A guide for states, districts, schools, universities. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration (UAP), National Transition Network.


Winn, C. (2001). Understanding the value and use of the natural environment. In At Home and At Daycare Training Manual, pp. 1-16.




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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Project Directory


1.O ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT
1.1 Administrative Support Service Sarah Rule
1.2 K-SAR Video Production and Distance Learning Thomas Risk
1.3 Program Development and Administration Sarah Rule
1.4 Utah Legislative Coalition for Persons with Disabilities Sarah Rule
2.O DISSEMINATION
2.1 CPD Dissemination Richard Baer
2.2 CPD Publications Richard Baer
2.3 Family Resource Library Linda Chisholm
3.O EXEMPLARY SERVICES
3.1 Up-to-3 Sue Olsen
3.2 Bear River Activity and Skill Center Richard Baer
3.3 Clinical Services Pat Truhn
3.4 Family Day Care Nutition Program Jeanie Peck
3.5 Specialty Clinics Dennis Odell
3.6 The Utah Assistive Technology Program Martin Blair
Judith Holt
3.7 Indian Children's Program Marvin Fifield
3.8 Utah Community Deveopment Block Grant Richard Baer
4.O INSERVICE TRAINING
4.1 CECSEP Cyndi Rowland
4.2 Fundamentals of AT Martin Blair
Sarah Rule
4.3 Interagency Outreach Training Initiative Sarah Rule
4.4 Super Vision Project Jill Morgan
5.O INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
5.1 Core Science Programs Alan Hofmeister
5.2 Curriculum Reform Cyndi Rowland
5.3 Development of SBD.PAL Expert System Alan Hofmeister
5.4 Estimator Richard Baer
5.5 SPIES Outreach Project Sarah Rule
5.6 Development of Multimedia Alan Hofmeister
5.7 Videotape Project Alan Hofmeister
5.8 Adaption of Captioning of Standards Thomas Risk
6.O PRESERVICE TRAINING
6.1 Interdisciplinary Training Judith Holt
6.2 Program to Prepare EI/Early Childhood Special Ed Personnel Sarah Rule
6.3 Utah Multi-Sensory Consortium Sarah Rule
6.4 Utah Multi-University Consortium Sarah Rule
7.O RESEARCH
7.1 InReach Glenna Boyce
7.2 A Financial Study of Ohio's Statewide EI Services Linda Goetze
7.3 Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support Mark Innocenti
7.4 Bridges in the Lives of Youths with Disabilities Linda Goetze
7.5 Immune Mechanism in Autism Dennis Odell
Ron Torres
7.6 Family Alliances for Supports Today and Tomorrow Richard Baer
7.7 MHC Associated Abnormaities in Autism Dennis Odell
Ron Torres
7.8 Monitoring and Measuring Systems of Care Richard Roberts
Diane Behl
7.9 Touch and Failure to Thrive Vonda Jump
7.10 Utah Early Intervention Project Follow-up Mark Innocenti
7.11 Utah Frontiers Project Glenna Boyce
7.12 Promoting Resilient Outcomes Mark Innocenti
8.O TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
8.1 Finding Utah's Most In-Need Children Daniel Judd
Mark Innocenti
8.2 Staff Development Materials on Autism Alan Hofmeister
8.3 Development of Transition Satisfaction Survey Alan Hofmeister
8.4 LRBI Quality Implementation Training Tapes Alan Hofmeister
8.5 Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center John Copenhaver
8.6 Opening Doors into Rural Communities Richard Roberts
Adrienne Akers
8.7 Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Community Evaluation Margaret Lubke
8.8 Personnel Devleopment/Paraprofessionals in Special Ed Alan Hofmeister
8.9 Web Accessibility in Mind (WebAIM) Cyndi Rowland
8.10 Hawaii Monitoring Contract Margaret Lubke


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Center for Persons with Disabilities Annual Report 2001
Project Descriptions


Center for Persons with Disabilities

1.0 Administration and Development

1.1 Administrative Support Services

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule Utah State Legislature, ADD, Overhead from Grants and Contracts

Description:

Administrative support is offered to all programs operated by the CPD. Support includes computer networking, hardware and software consultation, media development, information dissemination, accounting and purchasing services, procedural assistance with university reporting and regulations, and assistance to consumers and families.

Accomplishments:

Funds from the Utah Legislature andthe Administration on Developmental Disabilitiescontinued to support administrative functions for the CPD as a Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities' Education, Research, and Services. In addition to business and support functions within the CPD and Utah State University, activities included technical assistance to the Governors' Council and the Disability Law Center and collaboration with state agency heads and consumer and family organizations. The provision of inservice education in coordination with these organizations was amajor emphasis. CPD personnel continued to be activein the American Association of University Affiliated Programs to address issues of importance to the national network of University Centers.

1.2 K-SAR Video Production and Distance Learning

Contact Person: Funding:

Thomas Risk Fee for Services

Description:

K-SAR Video Production Facility is an award-winning, state-of-the-art multimedia production facility located at the Center for Persons with a Disabilities. K-SAR has a full-time professional production staff with a variety of technical skills in production, post-production, graphic and Internet web page development.

Accomplishments:

K-SAR has improved its DVD capabilities to not only DVD-Video, but has included DVD-ROM, and EDVD. DVD Web connectivity has the potential to create online support for web-based online instruction that the Internet could never support at the current bandwidth. Distant Education utilizing desktop conferencing, video conferencing, and Web-streaming is all functioning and performing very well. K-SAR has also included DVD support to web-streaming to enhance the video segments for full screen video. K-SAR is now an active member of THUGs, Telehealth users group. This will allow us to better adapt to the states' video conference sites. Captioning technology for DVD and other multimedia has been accomplished with new hardware and software that allows for MPEG 2, 3, and 4 compression which includes DVD and the Internet. K-SAR now offers enhanced audio sweetening and mixing for various purposes. New audio hardware and software can clean up any audio source for repurposing, or Internet use. K-SAR has added new digital DVD-ROM cameras, and players/recorders to better support video streaming, and digital multimedia uses such as DVD, and non-linear editing.

1.3 Program Development and Administration

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ADD $200,000

Description:

Core support for the administration and program development activities of the CPD has been provided by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities since the Center was established in 1972. Support is used to strengthen the business office, center administration, and supervisory support for interdisciplinary training, dissemination, exemplary services, and evaluation. All CPD faculty who receive support by ADD core funding provide technical assistance and consultation to federal, state, and local service agencies to help link resources, disseminate information, and provide service systems for individuals with developmental disabilities.

Accomplishments:

Core support from the Administration on Developmental Disabilities helped to (a) support the interdisciplinary faculty and trainees at the Center,(b) participate with the Disability Law Center (Utah's Protection and Advocacy Agency) in


Center for Persons with Disabilities

decision-making and evaluation of outcomes, and(c) participate with the Governor's Council for People with Disabilities in needs assessment, supporting projects that address the goals of the current state plan, and to evaluate the impact of these projects for consumers who live with disabilities and their families. Core support also enabled the CPD consumer liaison and faculty to participate in activities of the AAUAP, the professional organization for University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. These included participation in the Council on Consumer Affairs and the National Board. This grant also supportedparticipation with organizations and projects including the Statewide Independent Living Council and the Utah Work Incentives Project to address housing, employment, and priority issues for consumers in the state.

1.4 Utah Legislative Coalition for Persons with Disabilities

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule Utah Governor's Council for Persons with Disabilities $28,384


Description:

The Utah Legislative Coalition for People with Disabilities Project is

CPD staff member

supported by many disability organizations in Utah, including the CPD, the Governor's Council for People with Disabilities, the Disability Law Center, state disability service agencies, and consumer groups. The Coalition was organized in 1977 to provide leadership, training, coordination, and technical assistance to parents, advocates, and advocacy organizations about disability legislation. This training and technical assistance includes information about the Utah legislative process, how legislation becomes law, and how to work with legislators. The Coalition identifies legislation which will improve services and programs for citizens with disabilities, and tracks these bills through the legislative session. Training and technical assistance on legislative issues and state appropriations are also provided to the legislature. Information generated by the various research and demonstration activities of the CPD is used as appropriate by Coalition members and the Utah State Legislature.

Accomplishments:

The Coalition continued to provide training regarding advocacy to consumers living with disabilities and family members. Among the successful initiatives in the current year were increased funding to institutions of higher education to accommodate students with disabilities, provision of matching Medicaid fundstopermit individuals with disabilities in a particular income bracket to return to workwithout losing access to health care, and cost of living increases for service providers and independent living center personnel.

2.0 Dissemination

2.1 CPD Dissemination

Contact Person: Funding:

Richard Baer CPD $25,000

Description:

The Products Initiative of the CPD serves as a major vehicle for dissemination of print, video-based and software materials to assist people with disabilities and their families. The Outreach Division publishes a print and online electronic catalog of products in the areas of academics, assessment, assistive technology, behavior management, collaboration, consumer information, early childhood, effective instruction, inclusion, individualized education, parent resources, rehabilitation counseling, Section 504, and vocational skills. The electronic catalog appears on the CPD's Web page. Finally, extensive mailing lists have been developed to target products for particular consumer groups such as special educators, early interventionists, vocational rehabilitation counselors, adult service providers, etc.

Outreach, Development, and Dissemination Division also supports the dissemination efforts of other divisions and projects by offering photocopying, fax, binding and a variety of other services.

Accomplishments:

This year some 762 products were disseminated through catalog sales. Revenue from sales were in excess of $19,000. Photocopy, fax, and other services continued to be provided at roughly the same level as the 1999-2000.


Center for Persons with Disabilities

2.2 CPD Publications

Contact Person: Funding:
Richard Baer CPD $20,000

Description:

The CPD Outreach Division prepares and disseminates, free of charge, three periodic publications of interest to various groups. CPD News offers articles of interest to the professional community and each issue is disseminated internationally to approximately 2,700 subscribers quarterly. Research by CPD staff is often featured, allowing for quicker dissemination than that offered by most professional publications. Parent News features articles designed to be helpful to families of children with disabilities; 1,900 issues are disseminated four times a year. Finally, Enables is published fall and spring semesters each year , reaching an audience of about 3,300 at Utah State University. Its' primary purposes are to raise the consciousness of the university community regarding students, staff and faculty with disabilities and to provide helpful information on supporting them.

Accomplishments:

This year, four issues of CPD News were published and each was disseminated to approximately 2,600 individuals. Four issues of Parent News were published and disseminated to approximately 1,800 families. Several issues of Enables were published to keep the university community abreast of important disabilities issues. CPD publications were disseminated to 46 states and five foreign countries.

2.3 Family Resource Library

Contact Person: Funding:

Linda Chisholm CPD $9,936

Description:
The Family Resource Library contains approximately 2,000 books and videos for families of children with disabilities. The library is maintained as a lending library with free mailing of materials. Books and ordering information are listed in a catalog available upon request and on the Web. Procedural information and technical assistance are available to groups and agencies interested in replicating the library.

Accomplishments:

Approximately 170 books, videos and other materials were distributed to families during 2000-2001. Information on the library was disseminated at several state conferences. Renumbering of holdings was begun in preparation for listing them on the CPD Website and initiating electronic ordering.

3.0 Exemplary Services

3.1 Up-To-3

Contact Person: Funding:

Sue Olsen Utah Department of Health $551,856.00

CPD staff members

State Medicaid Reimbursements $152,8010


Description:

This program is contracted by the Utah Department of Health to serve families with infants or toddlers up to three years of age who have developmental delays or diagnosed conditions with a high probability of resulting in developmental delay. The intent of the program is to provide family-focused infant/toddler services in Rich, Box Elder, and Cache Counties in the natural environment of the child, therefore enhancing child development and supporting the family. Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP) are developed for each family which identifies the child and family outcomes/goals.

Accomplishments:

The Family and Child Development Program (FCDP) has once again under gone a name change. Our new name is Up-To-3 Early Intervention. The program was assisted by Dr. David Hailey who felt the program needed a name and logo which


Center for Persons with Disabilities

would be easy to remember, increase name recognition and program identity, and have positive uplifting characteristics. New brochures and professional contact letters will be disseminated to primary referral sources and community agencies. During the reporting period, Up-To-3 provided services to an average of 190 children and their families each month; a total of 487 children received service over the past twelve months. Additionally, during any average month, the Up-To-3 program responds to the needs of 35 new referrals, transitions 15 children to four different school districts, and contacts an average of 25 children who are "high risk" for developmental delays on the tracking and monitoring program. The Up-To-3 program has increased direct service providers to a total of 13.9 FTE. The program has two full-time physical therapists, the equivalent of one full-time occupational therapist, two full time speech pathologists, and 7.2 full-time equivalent service coordinators/developmental specialists. The Up-To-3 program has the highest service provider to child ratio in the state. Early intervention staff are required to complete the state Baby Watch credential within a year of hiring. Twelve staff have completed this process by finishing an average of 80 hours of inservice training and submitting a credential portfolio documenting preservice education and application of professional knowledge with children and families.

Program staff presented at the Wyoming Preschool Conference and at the National Division of Early Childhood Conference (DEC). The program also provides a training site for students from the Interdisciplinary Training Program (IDT), and the departments of Social Work, Communication Disorders, Special Education, and Psychology. Staff trained in AHEAD (a curriculum for children At Home & At Day Care), trained early intervention specialists both locally and nationally. Up-To-3 is using an on-site family participation process to provide parent-focused information for revising program policies and procedures, and public awareness materials. Four on-site family participation groups have been formed to discuss and provide feedback related to the program's intake and IFSP procedures, embedding outcomes in family routines, home visit form design, and the Up-To-3 brochure and family handbook. The web site has also been completed and will be revised to reflect on going changes and modifications.

3.2 Bear River Activity and Skill Center

Contact Person: Funding:

Richard Baer Department of Human Services $616,939

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Services $21,367

Bear River Association of Governments $1,371

Private pay: $23,370

Description:

BRASC provides training in functional, academic, social, daily living, and prevocational skills to adults with disabilities. Job development and placement services are provided utilizing competitive job-based training and supported employment service delivery models. In addition, BRASC offers family support services including respite, latch key, and summer recreation. Finally, supported living services were added to BRASC offerings this year.

Accomplishments:

BRASC continued to serve nearly 100 consumers from Logan to Bountiful, providing day training, supported employment, residential, and family support services. A center based family support program established in Bountiful was very successful as judged by comments from the families served. Unfortunately, the program proved too expensive and had to be terminated. After closing the facility, BRASC continued to serve Bountiful families by providing a summer program from a local high school. Robbyn Harper, BRASC director, resigned, causing rethinking of the administration. Paulette Godfrey was promoted to clinical coordinator of all Logan programs. Also, Craig Schaffer was hired as Brigham City clinical coordinator. Finally, Michelle Wilson was promoted to business manager for all of BRASC. The new arrangement seems to be working well.

3.3 Clinical Services

Contact Person: Funding:

Pat Truhn Client Fees $92,999

Description:

Clinical Services staff strives to develop and maintain exemplary service programs for clients to assure that client needs are met in a professional and ethical manner. Clinical Services serves as a clinical training site for USU students and the identified child clinical training practicum site for doctoral level psychology students at USU. The program financially supports two doctoral level psychology students with assistantships for advanced child clinical training.


Center for Persons with Disabilities

CPD staff member

Multidisciplinary assessment/evaluation and treatment services are provided at a reduced cost to children, youth and families and to adults with suspected learning or attentional problems or developmental disabilities. Referrals come from community agencies, school personnel, physicians, and private individuals. Additionally, Clinical Services staff provide disability evaluations for children and adults referred by Disability Determination Services for residents of the northern region of Utah. Clinical Services staff also provide consultation services to community agencies (i.e., Sunshine Terrace). Clinical Services staff work cooperatively with other Center Divisions and community agencies on direct client services programs, training, and research projects.

Accomplishments:

Clinical Services staff strives to develop and maintain exemplary service programs for clients to assure that client needs are met in a professional and ethical manner. Clinical Services serves as a clinical training site for

USU students and is one of the identified child clinical training practicum sites for doctoral level psychology students with assistantships for advanced child clinical training. Multidisciplinary assessment/evaluation and treatment services are provided at a reduced cost to children, youth and families, and to adults with suspected learning or attentional problems or developmental disabilities. Referrals come from community agencies, school personnel, physicians and private individuals. Additionally, Clinical Services staff provide disability evaluations for children and adults referred by Disability Determination Services for residents of the northern region of Utah. Clinical Services staff also provide consultation services to community agencies (i.e., Sunshine Terrace). Clinical Services staff work cooperatively with other Center Divisions and community agencies on direct client services programs, training and research projects.

During the past year, Clinical Services provided 2,200 hours of child clinical training to seven students enrolled in the child clinical practicum and 2,000 hours of advanced child clinical training to two psychology students. Clinical Services also provided clinical training to two interdisciplinary trainees. Clinical Services staff provided comprehensive interdisciplinary evaluations to 238 new clients during the year. Additionally, Clinical Services was awarded a fee-for-service subcontract to conduct comprehensive interdisciplinary clinical evaluations of clients referred by Utah's Disability Determination Division as part of a grant to AAUAP by the Social Security Administration. Staff served on the Ethics Committee at Sunshine Terrace and the Citizen's Foster Care review Board.

3.4 Family Day Care Nutrition Program

Contact Person: Funding:
Jeanie Peck USOE $125,000

Description:

This project administers the child nutrition program for family home day care providers. Providers receive training in standards of quality day care and nutrition program guidelines. Providers are given support and technical assistance. Meals served to children are reimbursed through federal funds.

Accomplishments:

All participating day care providers were monitored during the year. Currently, there are 155 homes participating in the program, with more than 1,850 children receiving services. Quarterly workshops were held for day care providers.

3.5 Specialty Clinics

Contact Person: Funding:
Dennis Odell Children's Special Health Services

Description:

Specialty clinics in developmental disabilities and neurology are held at the CPD periodically through Children's Special Health Services. In addition, referrals can be made to other specialty clinics held in other parts of the state by CSHS. Medical services are also provided to the Clinical Services Program as part of their evaluations. In addition, medical services are also provided to cover those with developmental disabilities who need medication or follow-up.


Center for Persons with Disabilities

Accomplishments:

During the past fiscal year, 262 patients were served through CPD Specialty clinics.

3.6 The Utah Assistive Technology Program (UATP)

Contact Persons: Funding:

Martin Blair USDOE/NIDRR $370,276

Judith Holt

Description:

The mission of the UATP is to expand availability of assistive technology devices and services through a consumer-responsive, comprehensive, statewide program of technology-related services. The project is administered by the CPD but jointly managed by a Board made up of the Directors of the State Division of Rehabilitation, Special Education, Family Health, Division of Services to People with Disabilities, private organizations, and consumers. The project provides information on assistive technology and assistive technology services , training materials, and technical assistance on funding. Special emphasis is placed on the systems change and consumer participation.

Accomplishments:

Various service and information networks have been developed including The Utah Center for Assistive Technology, Access Utah Network,The Utah Assistive Technology Foundation, andAssistive Technology Access Centersaround the State.During FY 2001, in collaboration with the Utah Legislative Coalition for People with Disabilities. UATP was successful in generating an additional $150,000 in state appropriated funds to be used for the purchase of assistive devices.Training was provided to over 2,000 individuals in the intermountain region. Technical assistance was provided to several hundred consumers and service providers in Utah. A statewide strategic plan was developed to enhance the availability of AT in Utah. Over $600,000 in federal funds and nearly $40,000 in state funds were acquired to improve access to AT throughout the state. Outreach and dissemination of AT-related information occurred in rural areas of Utah, including the Navajo Nation.

The project has reached thousands of consumers, caregivers and providers through presentations at conferences, fairs, exhibits, training events, schools, libraries, and provided technical assistance. An accessible play yard has been designed and is being developed in collaboration with Shriners Hospital. Outreach and dissemination of AT-related information has occurred in rural areas of Utah, to ethnic minority groups, limited English-speaking health care providers, and the elderly. The Intermountain Aging Review was edited and an article written by UATP staff. This was distributed to over 500 agencies in the Intermountain west. In addition, outreach targeted libraries to encourage participation in application for LSTA funds. More information is available on our website: http://www.uatpat.org.

3.7 Indian Children's Program

Contact Person: Funding:

Marvin Fifield IHS $835,000


Description:

This program provided diagnostic and clinical services to Indian children and familiesreferred by the Indian Health Service,tribal organizations and other community-based programs on the Navajo, Hopi, and multi Pueblo reservations in New Mexico, southern Colorado, and southern Utah. In addition, technical assistance and training was provided to the referring organizations in meeting the needs of children referred. The program was administered by the CPD as a consortium with theUniversity Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research, and Servicesin New Mexico and Arizona as consortium members. An organizational consortium and management structure provided direction and evaluation to the project.

The unique focus of this program was that services are delivered in the homes and communities where the children live. Training and technical assistance provided by project staff were determined by the clinical needs of the children referred who are unable to obtain services from other resources.

Accomplishments:

The project has provided assessment and treatment services to over 3,000 Indian children and their families located in 126 different rural and remote communities. Over 574 different community service agencies have referred children from the catchment area. In addition, over 21 Head Start programs have referred children for services. The average age of the


Center for Persons with Disabilities

children served was 5 years, and each family served was provided an average of six contacts.

For the most part, children referred and served are experiencing complicated and severe learning and/or behavioral problems.Evaluation, technical assistance, training, and therapy were provided by staff of theICP in the homes and communities of the families of the children served.Coordination and close relationships were maintained with onsite service projects and organizations.

A summary report on the services provided during the past 10 years of the program,which includes thesource of referrals andrecommendations, was published in January of 2001. Copies of this summary report can be obtained from the Center for Persons with Disabilities at Utah State University.

3.8 Utah Community Development Block Grant

Contact Person: Funding:

Richard Baer Community Development Block Grant $374,413

Description:

Bear River Activity and Skill Center (BRASC) provides day training, supported employment, and family support services out of facilities in Logan and Brigham City. The Community Development Block Grant provided funding to purchase the Logan facility and repair the roof of the facility in Brigham City.

Accomplishments:

The grant was secured and an environmental review completed. The facility was purchased. Improvements needed to bring the Logan facility into compliance with university code were completed. The building is now in use. The roof at the Brigham City facility is under repair.

4.0 Inservice Training

4.1 Collaborative Early Childhood Special Education Program through Distance Education (CECSEP)

Contact Person: Funding:

Cyndi Rowland Utah State Office of Education $112,646

Description:

The CECSEP program offers access to a Utah certification program in early childhood special education (ECSE). Many students live far from one of the two institutions of higher education in the state that offer coursework leading to the birth-to-five ECSE teaching certificate (i.e., Utah State University and the University of Utah). The Utah State Office of Education is a partner with USU and the U of U to increase the numbers of ECSE certified personnel in remote and rural areas. Most of the students involved in CECSEP are those who work full time in ECSE without proper certification. A typical student takes two courses a semester until they are completed with their program. The specialization coursework is delivered through multiple technologies including the statewide EDNET system which provides fully-interactive, real-time, televised broadcasts and the Internet. CECSEP coursework is supported with a website, (http://www.cecsep.usu.edu) where students can link to course materials, assignments (including the analysis of brief video clips), participate in "chats" with other students and instructors, and obtain information about program requirements, advisement, and funding opportunities. Practicum supervision is conducted over videoconferencing software in real-time. During lab experiences, local facilitators assist students in their home communities; thus students do not need to leave family or community ties to pursue a career in teaching young children with disabilities. The project supports faculty travel to coordinate across university programs, delivery of coursework via distance media, and tuition reimbursement for students who receive a "B" or better on required coursework.

Accomplishments:

In the past funding year the CECSEP project delivered courses to 61 students representing 18 school districts around the state. This year 6 students completed their student teaching.

Over the life of the project (seven years), the CECSEP staff have been in contact with 253 students, and conducted formal written advisement for 206 students across 33 Utah school districts. CECSEP has graduated a total of 36 students. There are currently 57 students actively seeking certification in early childhood special education by taking courses each semester.

The certification program has been extended to personnel in 33 school districts, including the 18 most rural in the state. By the end of this academic year, 50 total project students, who live in remote areas of the state, will have completed all the


Center for Persons with Disabilities

requirements for state certification. They could not have done so in the absence of this project. Many other students will complete certification in the following years. In this way, the CECSEP project has contributed significantly to quality education for young children with special needs in rural and remote areas of the state.

4.2 Fundamentals of AT: Skill and Competency-based Training

Contact Persons: Funding:

Martin Blair Administration on

Sarah Rule Developmental Disabilities, USDHHS $94,516

Description:

The Fundamentals of AT course provides critically needed skills and training to frontline providers, practitioners, and consumers in assessment, acquisition, financing, customization, and of assistive technology. The program is localized to the state of Utah and provides hands-on application exercises. It also serves as a networking opportunity for participants, enhances consumer/provider partnerships, and provides

CPD staff member

continuous updates on methods and devices in the ever-changing field of assistive technology.

Accomplishments:

During the second year of the project, 27 individuals participated in assistive technology training. These included special education teachers, speech and language pathologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and members of the Utah education agencies'adaptive and assistive technology action teams. Fourteen participated in the credentialing exam administered by RESNA. Participants were positive in their evaluations of the course. The content was developed in response to needs assessments from the group with input from consumers experienced in the use of assistive technology. Need assessments are being conducted for training that will be provided in the 2001-2002 year.

4.3 Interagency Outreach Training Initiative

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule State of Utah $460,000

Description:

To systematically address the outreach training needs in Utah, state funding was obtained by the CPD to assist Utah's disability service agencies in providing essential training and technical assistance. The Interagency Outreach Training Initiative (IOTI) addresses training gaps, particularly those where other funding is not available, such as paraprofessional training. In addition, the IOTI facilitates coordination of training efforts among disability service agencies and consumer groups in Utah.State agencies and organizations throughout the state participate in establishing training priorities andapproving proposals for training activities. Participating organizations include The Office ofRehabilitation Services, Office of Special Education Services, Division of Services for People withDisabilities, Division of Community and Family Health, Division of Mental Health, Division of Aging and Adult Services, Utah Schools for the Deaf and theBlind, the Utah Parent Center, and the Utah Governor's Council for People with Disabilities. Consumer representatives are appointed by the Governor's Council.

Accomplishments:

The IOTI funded nine projects during the 2000-2001 year: (1) "TrainingLaw Enforcement andJudicial Agency Personnel Regarding Consumers," $39,158, conducted by TURN Community Services and directed by Sue Behle; (2) "Training in Interpreter Certification," $33,153, conducted by the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind and directed by Joseph DiLorenzo; (3) "Training in Early Indicators of Emotional and Behavioral Problems," $25,000,conducted by The Children's Center and directed by Pamela Wilkinson; (4) "Training in Assistive Technology," $39,987, conducted by Utah State University and directed by Martin Blair; "Training for Child CareProviders," $11,000,conducted by the Children's ServiceSociety anddirected by Marty Shannon; (5) "TrainingLaw Enforcement and Judicial Agency Personnel Regarding Consumers with Disabilities," $31,978, conducted by the Salt Lake City Police Department and directed by Krista Dunn and Bill Shelton;(6) "Training in Self Determination," $15,500, conducted by the Arc of Utah and directed by Jerry Costley; (7) "Behavioral Training for Paraprofessionals," $44,816,conducted by Utah State University and directed by


Center for Persons with Disabilities

Marilyn Likins; (8) "Training in Positive Behavioral Supports," $49,580, conducted by the TURN Community Services and directed by Sue Behle; (9) "Paraprofessional Supported Employment Training," $114,943, conducted by Salt Lake Community Collegeand directed by Kate McConaughy. Results of these projects are currentlybeing compiled.

Data from the projects funded during the 1999-2000 year were analyzed. These indicated that 1,818 professionals, paraprofessionals, consumers with disabilities and family members participated in training. The projects collectively delivered 1,110 hours of training.

4.3 (a) Developmental Disabilities Justice Project

Contact Person: Funding:

Sue Behle IOTI $39,158

Description:
This project is designed to develop a curricula and provide training to law enforcement personnel in ten jurisdictions across the state about people with disabilities and their unique challenges as either offenders or victims in the criminal justice system. The project will also provide information and resources to 30 prosecuting attorneys, public defenders and judges in those same jurisdictions.

Accomplishments:

The project received referrals for training from other criminal justice groups upon the recommendations of training participants. All day trainings were provided to two large groups organized by the Children's Justice Center and to the staff at the Rape Recovery Center. In addition training was provided to69 law enforcement personnel from 23 municipalities, five sheriff's departments, 12 attorneys from five prosecutors' offices, 14 state DCFS workers (child protective services), 10 people from three courts, 18 counselors in the criminal justice system, and one doctor and one nurse from a hospital setting. Additional workshops are scheduled atan annual judges training, the statewide association of prosecutors, and a group of public defense lawyers.

4.3 (b) Supported Employment Training for Paraprofessionals

Contact Person: Funding:

Kate McConaughy IOTI $114,943

Description:

This project teaches paraprofessionals to serve as job coaches in supported employment. It uses a competency-based approach that teaches both knowledge and application of knowledge in the field. Community service organizations refer employees for the training. In addition to basic training, the project provides specialization inservice training on topics pertinent to experienced job coaches and the consumers they serve, and makes technical assistance available to address individual's needs.

Accomplishments:

The project delivered instruction both onsite and via distance education, as well as specialty administrative training sessions. Web-based curriculum was revised and additional information placed in the modules.

4.3 (c) Field Initiated Training: Mental Health Issues in Early Intervention

Contact Person: Funding:

Pamela Wilkison IOTI $25,000

Description:

This project provides a training program for paraprofessionals, parents, and professionals working with disabled infants and toddlers and their families in rural areas of the state. Training will assist families and providers from school special education preschool programs and mental health centers in identifying early indicators of emotional behavioral problems including adjustment disorders; attachment disorders; regulatory, anxiety, and mood disorders; autism; and posttraumatic stress disorder in the 0-5 population.

Topics include recognition of social-emotional developmental problems, when and where young children should be referred for mental health services, helping educate families regarding their children's mental health needs, and providing interventions to assist families with children at risk for the development of psychosocial pathology. The training will include both didactic presentations and small group, case-oriented discussions.


Center for Persons with Disabilities

Accomplishments:

Outreach and trainingfor early interventioncoordinators within the state. Curriculum and evaluation materials were developed. Appropriate assessment tools and interventions were discussed with participants. Training sites included Vernal, Price/Moab, Logan, and St. George. Each participant received a training package of resource materials, including screening and educational tools to implement in their work with disabled young children.

4.3 (d) Training is Assistive Technology

Contact Person: Funding:

Martin Blair IOTI $39,987

Description:

Collaborating partners from the Utah Assistive Technology Program (UATP), the Utah Bureau of Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN), the Disability Law Center (DLC) and the Social Research Institute (SRI) at the University of Utah developed and provided a consumer-responsive training program to educate consumers and service providers about how to gain access to assistive technology (AT) through the health care system in Utah.

Accomplishments:

This assistive technology training grant generated an overwhelming degree of interest statewide among professionals who prescribe AT for people with disabilities.Approximately 210 individuals attended eight sixty-minute presentations and 104 people participated in two half-day trainings to learn how to access assistive technology through the health care system in Utah, approximately four times as many people as estimated would participate in the grant proposal. Participants learned how to identify critical elements of letters of medical necessity and of the assistive technology funding request process, as well as how to identify information needed for the appeal process after receiving a denied assistive technology funding request.

4.3 (e) Interpreter Certification Training

Contact Person: Funding:

Joseph DiLorenzo IOTI $33,153

Description:

Since 1994, The Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind (USDB), has offered certification assistance to uncertified persons working as sign language interpreters in rural areas statewide. In 1996, USDB received a grant from Utah State University, Interagency Outreach Training Initiative to expand training that would include employees working for other agencies. This expansion provides interpreter training expertise to individuals who otherwise would not have the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills in sign language interpreting.

Accomplishments:

Technology allows USDB to reach individuals statewide. First, The Utah Educational Network broadcasts USDB's interpreter training weekly, on Mondays and Fridays in nine locations, including Ogden, Logan, Orem, Richfield, St. George, Blanding, Cedar City, Manila and Vernal. Second, three weekend immersion workshops are presented throughout the year on the campus of USDB in Ogden. Overnight accommodations and meals are available free of charge. Third, a

CPD staff members

one-week intensive summer camp is offered to prepare participants for the State of Utah's interpreter certification tests. Finally, USDB provides a small reimbursement stipend to individuals taking state certification tests who have participated consistently in year round training. Over the past five years Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind has helped more than sixty individuals pass state certification tests.

For more information on how you can participate with USDB, please contact, Jean Thomas at: 801-629-4821 or by email at: bsogd1.jthomas@state.ut.us .

4.3 (f) Self Determination Training (An IOTI initiative)

Contact Person: Funding:

Jerry Costley IOTI $15,500


Center for Persons with Disabilities

Description:

This project provides training to family members and staff with regard to the moral, ethical, and legal issues involved with people with disabilities decisions about self determination.

Accomplishments:

This project will be extended to complete the objectives of the workscope.

4.3 (g) Positive Behavioral Supports (An IOTI initiative)

Contact Person: Funding:

Sue Behle IOTI $49,580


Description:

This project provides training to adult service providers about the use of positive behavioral supports. The project used a previously-developed curriculum to provide systematic training to direct care and supervisory staff who work in

CPD staff member

community-based and ICF/MR programs. Participants complete field-based assignments on the job.

Accomplishments:

Curriculum and manuals were revised and produced according to interviews. In addition to the training provided paraprofessionals and behavioral specialists, several parent groups also requested training. Feedback indicates a high level of satisfaction for the training.

The project was also asked to develop and conduct training for staff at the new program for people with disabilities at the Utah State Prison and staff from the forensic unit at the State Mental Hospital.Ongoing requests and increased number of attendees validates the efficacy of the training.

4.3 (h) Positive Behavioral Supports (An IOTI initiative)

Contact Person: Funding:

Marilyn Likins IOTI $44,816


Description:

The Utah Association of Community Services has been operating the Positive Behavior Supports Project for several years. Over that time, the project has provided 40 hours of training to over 200 provider staff. This year, the trainees will include teachers and parents as well as provider staff. The project employs a combination of the most knowledgeable academicians and practitioners in the field of behavior in the state of Utah. The trainers include Dr. Sue Behle, Debbie Harbert, Marion Hunt, Dr. Shelia Forsythe, Dr. Rob O'Neal, Dr. Robert Morgan, Jim Harrison and Dr. Allan Tribble. The curriculum was developed and delivered by these experts who also provide hands-on follow-up site visits to help implement the learned techniques on the ground.

The curriculum was based on a model developed at the University of Utah Department of Special Education and then revised and refined to meet the specific needs of Division of Services for People with Disabilities' providers. The curriculum combines the best of positive behavioral approaches including functional assessment and related positive interventions. It is designed to fit into a person-centered approach and encourage self-determination as well as to develop strong protections for the human rights of people with developmental disabilities. Each trainee will complete between 30 and 40 hours of direct classroom training as well as another 10 to 20 hours of hands on-site instruction. A manual is included for each trainee as well as several components of evaluation including a performance evaluation.

Anyone interested in participating in Positive Behavioral Supports training, please call the Utah Association of Community Services at (801) 328-4580. A training session will begin in Salt Lake on January 6, at Community Treatment Alternatives. Other training will begin in the Northern Region in March, and in the Provo and Eastern Region in February. Please contact the UACS office for time and a schedule. The training and materials are free for participants. Parents, teachers as well as direct care staff are invited to attend.


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Accomplishments:

Two semester credit hours are available for this paraeducator course offered via distance education (SPED 6790). After discussion with other instructors, it was decided that it was very appropriate for teacher/paraeducator teams to take the course, thereby sharing the same information, discussing, and planning for more effective management within their work settings. The behavioral content of the course remained the same, but a supervision, observation and planning component were added to the teachers' course requirements. The class was broadcast to districts in Tooele, Ogden, Weber, Box Elder, Davis, Gunnison, Roosevelt, Salt Lake, Jordan, Murray, Granite, St. George and Monument Valley.

4.3 (i) Special Needs Training for Child Care Providers

Contact Person: Funding:
Marty Shannon IOTI $11,000

Description:

Training for child care providers on topics such as inclusive child care, getting to know children with disabilities, building relationships with families and including children with disabilities in daily activities are provided.

Accomplishments:

Two qualified instructors worked in a team-teaching environment and conducted four sessions within the state in collaboration with Child Care Resource and Referrals. Training was offered from Kaysville to St. George, Utah.The biggest accomplishment was to the change of attitude about caring for children with disabilities.

4.3 (j) Training Law Enforcement and Judicial Agency Personnel Regarding Consumers with Disabilities

Contact Person: Funding:

Krista Dunn IOTI $31,978

Bill Shelton

Description: This project will assist the police department in creating special units called Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) made up of officers, mental health providers, consumer advocates and others to develop and provide the curriculum for police trainers. These teams will provide training to officers (CIT certification) consisting of a 40-hour multidisciplinary training, along with mandatory recertification to maintain standards and update knowledge. The project was granted an extension for completion of training to December 30, 2001.

Accomplishments:

Officers were selected for the training teams.Project staff worked with the State Department of Mental Health to develop a certification program, and to design a pin that CIT officers could wear that would be recognizable by consumers. Project staff also worked with the jail and institutions that serve persons with mental illness in Salt Lake City to streamline and coordinate efforts.Twenty-six officers, four sheriffs' deputies and one dispatch supervisorwere trained and certified. Training was so successful and well received that one officer was assigned as a CIT traineras a full-time position. Site visits were made to the state mental hospital to further enhance participants' exposure to and ability to develop relationships with mental health consumers.CIT trainees also participated in a fun program for children at the Shriner's Hospital that will become an annual event.

4.4 Super Vision Project

Contact Person: Funding:

Jill Morgan USDOE $167,700

Description:

This project trains teachers in Utah and Idaho to supervise paraeducators using validated curriculum and a problem-solving, consultative method. Using experienced and well-qualified staff at the Center for Persons with Disabilities, this project includes a training of trainers component, to strengthen local capacity in participating school districts providing the means of ongoing support and training at termination of the funding period. Teachers already possess instructional and behavior management skills, but typically have not been trained in the direct supervision and training of paraeducators in the use of these skills for the delivery of quality educational services to children and youth with disabilities.


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Accomplishments:

Since the beginning of the project, over 400 semester hours of training in teamwork and self-evaluation have been provided to teachers and paraeducators Utah, Idaho, and Nevada. During the current year, workshops and seminars have also been presented on topics such as teamwork, defining roles and expectations, and effective communication and supervision of paraeducators to more than 300 teachers and paraeducators, and approximately 100 education administrators have attended presentations on the issues surrounding the employment, training and supervision of paraeducators at state and national conferences. The participant manual entitled Teamwork and Self-Evaluation for Teachers and Paraeducators was completed in 2000, and a facilitator manual containing training resources followed in 2001. Field data have been collected for an administrator handbook to be produced by project's end.


5.0 INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

5.1 Core Science Programs: Dissemination and Effective Implementation

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister USDOE $147,890

Description:

The purpose of this project is to support regular and special education teachers in addressing the needs of students with disabilities in the area of science.

Accomplishments:

The program was implemented in 25 sites across Utah and Idaho. The sites emphasized students with learning disabilities. This year's workscope was the transfer of video staff development materials from videotape to DVD.

5.2 Curriculum Reform: The Development of a Curriculum Template for Applied Problem-Solving in Distance Education Learning Communities

Contact Person: Funding:

Cyndi Rowland U.S. Department of Education, Fund for the Improvement of

Postsecondary Education $142,970

Description:

The purpose of this three-year project is to create and evaluate the use of a low-cost multimedia curriculum tool (hybrid CD-ROM with Internet capabilities) that will assist students, particularly distance education students, to (a) apply and reflect upon what they have learned with instructor support and feedback, and (b) participate in a community of learners who engage in constructive problem-solving. The project uses a Research and Development design to create this curricular tool. During development, the project will support nine field-tests across five disciplines found in postsecondary education. Given formative data at the conclusion of each field-test, the curriculum will be refined and readied for the next field test. Dissemination of the findings and use of the curricular tool and process is an important aspect of the project. Staff working on this innovative project hope to provide postsecondary education with a low-cost, practical, and replicable solution to the problem of getting students to apply what they have learned in their coursework and to participate with communities of learners.

Accomplishments:
During this year, the Acropolis tool was entirely redesigned into a Cold Fusion format. This decision allowed the Acropolis team to add features seen as desirable from year two field-test participants as well as create a tool that could be sustained long after the period of federal funding. The Acropolis team also attended to details in the tool so that Acropolis would be fully accessible to individuals with disabilities. After the redesign, five instructors across two institutions of higher education used Acropolis in their courses. Evaluation data indicate that Acropolis is as effective as other class-based simulations and that both students and instructors enjoyed their Acropolis experience. One unexpected accomplishment this year was the development of a chat tool that is fully accessible to individuals with disabilities.

5.3 Development of SBD.PAL Expert System

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister USOE $5,000

Description:

During the last project year, staff focused on developing a set of materials to assist educators in conducting and interpret


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ing a functional analysis. These materials were designed to interface with the expert system. The goals of the materials are to assist educators in: (1) identifying factors that precede and follow the problem behavior; (2) interpreting the factors to hypothesize one or more motivations or reasons for the students' behavior; and (3) Developing a set of intervention strategies.

Accomplishments:

Materials completed contain a computer program and a short implementation manual. This project is now completed.

5.4 Estimator

Contact Person: Funding:

Richard Baer Utah State Office of Education $50,398

Description:

This project is a cooperative effort between the CPD and Effective Instructional Materials and Systems. It is updating software used by Utah special educators to calculate the discrepancy between aptitude/IQ and achievement. This is an important consideration in determining if a student has a specific learning disability. Since the necessary calculations are lengthy and require detailed knowledge of test characteristics, the Estimator software saves expensive professional time and minimizes the possibility of errors.

Accomplishments:

A new version of the Estimator software, Version 7.0 was developed and distributed to all Utah school districts during the 1999-00 school year. Project staff have met monthly with the state's LD test selection committee which reviews tests and makes recommendations to the

CPD staff members

State Office of Education for tests to be included in the Estimator software. A research project to systematically consider the correlation between aptitude and achievement for each of the federal LD achievement areas is being planned. Finally, application was made to present a paper and a poster on Estimator at the 2001 National Association of School Psychologist's annual convention.

5.5 SPIES Outreach Project (Strategies for Preschool Intervention in Everyday Settings)

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule OSERS $146,919

Description:

Today, many who provide services designed to promote the development of children share the belief that services should be conducted within the context of everyday settings. In the SPIES curriculum, everyday settings are defined as the daily routines and activities that are part of a child's life. In the home, these routines and activities may include dressing, eating, brushing teeth, and playing with family members. At school, they may include center time, snack time, story time, and free play. In the community they may include shopping or attending entertainment. For most children, interacting in everyday settings is all that is needed to promote their optimal development. However, children with disabilities, special health needs, or those who are at risk for the development of a disability often need supports in order to learn and develop through interactions in everyday settings. In these instances, adults can provide intervention to help the child learn and develop in areas where he may need special help and encouragement.

The intervention strategies introduced in SPIES are designed to help children master their goals and objectives. Using everyday settings as the context for intervention, we will show how adults can plan and carry out intervention and how they can determine if intervention was successful. We do not mean to suggest that the intervention strategies introduced in SPIES are the only ones available, nor do we mean to suggest that all intervention can occur in everyday settings. We do want to show adults ways to take advantage of everyday settings to provide intervention that can help children master a variety of goals and objectives. The intervention strategies introduced in SPIES are based on methods of instruction that may be called naturalistic. Naturalistic methods of instruction have the following characteristics: They are used in everyday settings, incorporate developmentally and individually appropriate activities, and are based on a child's interest. The first characteristic of Naturalistic methods is that they are used in everyday settings. There are several advantages to embedding instruction in everyday settings. One advantage is that it allows for dispersed practice and


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children can practice skills throughout the day in a variety of settings. For example, a child can practice a language goal, such as labeling objects during story time, snack time, or free play. This process encourages the generalization of skills across settings. Another advantage is that the adult can help children integrate multiple skills in a single setting. For example, during free play the adult can help a child work on several objectives that may include social skills, motor skills, and language skills. The second characteristic of Naturalistic methods is that they incorporate developmentally and individually appropriate activities. Developmentally and individually appropriate activities support "the notion that all young children should have equal opportunities to experience their surroundings, to make choices, to develop independence and to move beyond their current skills, concepts and strategies". Developmentally appropriate activities are those that other children of the same age choose to do and that promote learning and development by keeping children actively engaged. Individually appropriate activities are those that may be adapted so that a child with a disability can participate, even though he may not participate in the same way as other children. The third characteristic of Naturalistic methods is that they are based a child's interest. If a teaching opportunity is based on a child's interest, the adult can be reasonably sure the skills and concepts taught are relevant to the child and have a clear purpose.

CPD staff member

Accomplishments:

The SPIES curriculum is now used and evaluated by formal outreach 24 sites throughout the United States. For the year 2000-2001, we have received evaluation data from an additional 151 persons trained through the curriculum. Outside of our formal evaluation process, an additional 273 persons have received SPIES training. SPIES has now been disseminated to 33 states, Puerto Rico, and Iceland. The SPIES Internet Site has been enhanced to provide added value through training enhancements, an annotated bibliography and links to other early childhood sites. SPIES related presentations have been made at several state and national conferences, including the Division of Early Childhood Conference and the Annual Conference of the American Council on Rural Special Education. Project SPIES has

designed a website specifically for parents and caregivers of children with disabilities (SPIES for Parents at http://www.cpd.usu.edu/spiesparents/). This website has modified SPIES to be accessible to the layperson and to be accessible through the Internet. SPIES continues to arrange for additional outreach sites and continues to improve the delivery of the SPIES for Parents website.

5.6 The Development of Multimedia to Foster Inclusion, Self-Esteem, and Prevention of New Disabilities

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister Utah State Office of Education $12,050

Description:

This project funded the preparation of a public service announcement of foster inclusion, self-esteem, and prevention of new disabilities.

Accomplishments:

Programs have been telecast to TV viewers. This project has been completed.

5.7 Videotape Project - Employing Persons with Disabilities

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister Utah State Office of Education $28,000

Description:

Last year's funding produced an eleven-minute videotape featuring the benefits of hiring people with disabilities. Production of a second videotape detailing more specific information about hiring people with disabilities is underway. All production will be under the guidance of the Utah Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities.

Accomplishments:
The videotape training program completed and disseminated.


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5.8 Adaption of Captioning of Standards for Digital Video Technologies

Contact Person: Funding:

Thomas Risk USDOE $119,202

Description:

This project worked to make multimedia materials more accessible by adapting captioning standards for digital technologies.

Accomplishments:

The CD-ROMs demonstrating the multimedia captioning technology have been developed and submitted for external review. The program has been completed. A manual and instructions are now available for anyone interested in captioning for CD-ROM, and is available through K-SAR Productions.

6.0 Preservice Training

6.1 Interdisciplinary Training

Contact Person: Funding:

Judith Holt Not applicable

Description:

The Interdisciplinary Training (IDT) program provides opportunities for students from a variety of disciplines as well as consumers with disabilities and family members of children with disabilities to become part of interdisciplinary teams. These teams, with faculty mentors, will provide services and supports to children with disabilities and their families, as well as adults with disabilities. The didactic, clinical, and research components of this program are carefully designed and implemented to enhance the trainees' awareness, knowledge and skills. With the growing trend towards collaborative interdisciplinary efforts in the workplace, there is an increased need for persons who have strong, well-developed interdisciplinary teamwork skills. Additionally, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has extended the need for awareness and knowledge of disability issues to all employers, employees, and to the general public. IDT trainees may participate in the interdisciplinary training program at one of three levels:

· Orientation/Awareness;

· Intermediate/Skill Development; or

· Leadership / Specialist /Experiential.

Regardless of the level of competency selected, each trainee will develop an Individualized Training Plan, in consultation with an assigned faculty advisor and the IDT Director. The Individualized Training Plan addresses the IDT core competencies and objectives. To fulfill these competencies, the trainee will participate in a series of seminars and select from a menu of clinical and research experiences. In addition to the broad array of services and settings for children and adults with disabilities provided by the Center for Persons with Disabilities, community-based programs will also be utilized for training purposes. Both graduate and undergraduate students may apply for the IDT program. Stipends may be available for long-term trainees. The IDT program is also available for 1-3 hours of credit (undergraduate and graduate) through the Department of Special Education. The IDT program is also available to consumers with disabilities as well as family members of children with disabilities.

Accomplishments:

During the academic year 2000-2001, 16 long-term trainees successfully completed the IDT. Disciplines represented: audiology, community health, English, family and marriage therapy, psychology, social work, special education, speech and language pathology. Three trainees were adults with disabilities. Faculty and professional staff from each of the CPD Divisions assisted with the IDT Program and faculty from Comm.D and Psychology also participated in a supervisory role. Overall, approximately. 50 individuals were actively involved, in addition to the trainees. Each long-term trainee completed 300 clock hours of training experiences including:

A. A didactic component which included weekly three-hour seminars during Fall 2000 and Spring 2001. Faculty from all CPD Divisions and several USU Departments presented the seminars, in collaboration with parents, service providers and adults with disabilities. Seminars were provided on the following topics: Mission of the CPD and the IDT program; Disability legislation and funding; Advocacy for people with disabilities; Interdisciplinary teaming; Service agencies for individuals with disabilities; Research methodologies;


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Research databases relating to health and disabilities; Molecular research and disabilities; How to be an informed consumer of research; and Cultural and diversity issues.

B. A clinical component, including participation at a variety of clinical sites associated with the CPD; Bear River Activity Skills Center (BRASC), Family and Child Development Program (FCDP - transition preschool and home visits), Clinical Services, Child Care Nutrition Program, and the Utah Assistive Technology Program.

C. Research activities, including directed experiences in the Biomedical Laboratory, and participation in program evaluation using a Participatory Action Research model . In order to strengthen skills in working with individuals with disabilities and their families, trainees were required to accompany service providers on at least two home visits. They were also assigned to Participatory Action Research (PAR) teams, which investigated issues faced by service providers (BRASC, Clinical Services and FCDP). These teams consisted of trainees, service provider staff, and individuals with disabilities or family members. Feedback from trainees suggested that some of the most powerful insights gained from the program were gained through contact with parents and other

CPD staff member

family members of individuals with disabilities and ongoing contact with the trainees who were also consumers of services.

In addition, in March 2001, a partnership between the University of Utah Medical School and the CPD was awarded a five-year grant from the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health: the Utah Regional Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Program (ULEND). This was the only new program funded in the competition, and drew heavily on the newly established IDT program as a model. It will provide $1.5 million over five years to support interdisciplinary training between the two campuses with trainees in medical and health professions. The PAR teams were featured on a poster presented at the Fifth Annual EIRI conference, at USU's Disability Awareness Day, and to the CPD Advisory Board. The use of the PAR model with IDT trainees is an innovative addition to interdisciplinary training that is unique to the CPD. Three manuscripts are being prepared for publication, with others under discussion. The viability of the IDT Program has led to several other projects: (1) assisting the Utah Department of Health in collecting and analyzing data to develop a statewide plan for children and adults with traumatic brain injury; (2) analyzing results from a statewide fiscal intermediary survey for the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities; and (3) supporting the program evaluation process conducted by the Multi-University Consortium in Sensory Impairments.

6.2 Program to Prepare Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education Personnel

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule OSERS $109,646

Description:

This project addresses the critical shortage of personnel prepared to serve young children with disabilities and their families. The project will support students who pursue a program of study leading to Utah's early childhood special education teaching certificate and/or its early intervention credential. The goal is to provide financial support to some 77 students. The project will support students who complete a minor program of study in early childhood special education. It also supports the development and delivery of an interdisciplinary course co-instructed by faculty from the Departments of Special Education and Family and Human Development. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to work with team members from other disciplines in the delivery of intervention services. Interdisciplinary teams of students complete an experience in serving young children with disabilities in inclusive settings.

Accomplishments:
Twenty five students received support from the project between December, 2000 and July, 2001. Eleven students were recommended for certification in early childhood special education between July, 2000 and June 30, 2001. Course co-instruction continued with faculty from the Department of Family and Human Development, the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitationand a parent of children with disabilities.


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6.3 Utah Multi-Sensory Consortium: Statewide Preparation of Early Childhood Specialists and K-12 Teachers in Vision and Hearing Impairments

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule University of Utah Subcontract $128,970

Description:

This project supports students who wish to obtain endorsements to teach students with vision impairments and who are ages birth through 21 years. It is a collaborative effort between the University of Utah and Utah State University to address the shortage of teachers qualified to serve students with sensory impairments.

Accomplishments:

During the first year of the project, faculty from Utah State University and the University of Utah worked to establish cooperative advisement procedures, address student recruitment with an emphasis on cultural diversity, and to develop a database for tracking and monitoring student progress. Coursework was offered as planned, both on campus and at a distance. Seven students received support for their studies from the USU subcontract.

6.4 Utah Multi-University Consortium: Statewide Preparation of Early Childhood Specialists in Vision and Hearing

Contact Person: Funding:

Sarah Rule OSERS $40,000

Description:

This project will prepare certified early childhood special education teachers to obtain the recently-approved endorsement to teach young children with vision impairments. It is a multi-university effort of the University of Utah (Kathleen Robins, Principal Investigator) and Utah State University. Students obtain the early childhood special education certificate either on campus at the University of Utah or Utah State or off campus through the Collaborative Early Childhood Special Education Program. The additional endorsement courses are taken through the Multi-University Consortium for Sensory Impairments.

Accomplishments:

During the current (and final) year of the project, 12 students received support through Utah State University tocomplete the endorsement to teach young children with sensory impairments.Staff will complete final evaluation procedures to document the impact of the project.

7.0 Research

7.1 InReach: An Investigation of a Collaborative Transition Model from NICU to Early Intervention

Contact Person: Funding:
Glenna Boyce USDOE $179,995

Description:

The purpose of InReach is to develop, implement, and test a collaborative transition process and a strengths-based/mutual competency home visiting model of intervention. This project is addressing the intervention needs of a special group of infants whose birthweight (<1000g) or gestational age (< 30 weeks) make them presumptively eligible for Part C early intervention services. The project's goals are to:

·Examine the current transition process and common interventions for this population;

·Collaboratively develop a seamless transition process that supports parents and provides necessary services;

·Adapt a strengths-based/mutual competency model of intervention for use with this population; and

·Compare the effects of alternative transition experience in terms of child, family, and system outcomes.

Accomplishments:

The project achievements during the year are summarized in the following:

1. Enlistment of infants and families ended in November, 2000 with 21 in the comparison group and 40 in the DDI VANTAGE (experimental) group. The final assessments (when the infants are 15 months of age) is ongoing and will be completed in November of 2001.
2. During the InReach study the collaborative transition focused on having a joint IFSP (Individualized Family Service Plan) care conference in the hospital with the family and NICU and DDI VANTAGE staff participating.


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These were successfully held for each infant in the experimental group, as planned, although two were held in the families' homes due to early, unanticipated discharge from the NICU.

3. DDI VANTAGE staff are continuing to implement the activities learned in the mutual competency training, including making home movies of daily activities with the parent and infant, jointly administering (with the parent) the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, and sending the infant updates to the NICU case manager.

4. Dissemination of preliminary findings is ongoing with presentations being made at both local and national conferences.

7.2 A Financial Study of Ohio's Statewide Early Intervention Services

Contact Person: Funding:

Linda Goetze Ohio Department of Health $341,736

Description:

The overall goal of this project is to develop and describe at the state and county levels, Ohio's current early intervention finance policy, services, and associated costs, and to develop alternatives and recommendations for changes in those policies.

Accomplishments:

To meet the requirements for this proposal, a comprehensive evaluation of the Ohio early intervention system will be conducted with a focus on the following tasks:

1) A description of current early intervention state and county policy. This will describe various key early intervention components and will particularly focus on the variations in finance, cost, and services throughout the state;

2) A review of research and models from other states particularly focused on efforts related to early intervention finance;

3) Employ Participatory Action Research (PAR) methods with early intervention stakeholders, utilizing information gathered in 1 and 2 above, to develop proposed changes to policies that support effective early intervention services;

4) Bring together the information gained through this evaluation, along with input from various key early intervention stakeholders in Ohio, to develop a viable plan for system change in financing.

7.3 Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support

Contact Person: Funding:

Mark Innocenti OSERS $407,250

Description:

This project will test language and emergent literacy outcomes of a Bilingual Early Language and Literacy Support (BELLS) Program, which will include both early English immersion and home language and literacy support. The multi-site, naturalistic, longitudinal comparative study will be conducted in Utah in conjunction with the Guadalupe Schools in Salt Lake City. The combined effects of the home language environment and early English immersion will be examined in relation to emergent literacy outcomes. The research objectives are:

· Does early English immersion of infants from Spanish-speaking families, beginning at ages 1, 2, or 3, facilitate English language and emergent literacy skills by ages 4 and 5?

· Does an enriched home language and literacy environment, whether in English or Spanish, facilitate language and emergent literacy skills in relation to early English immersion?

· Do specific intervention strategies, focused on language and emergent literacy, that are individualized and developmentally appropriate in naturalistic contexts improve the acquisition of language and emergent literacy in both English and the home language?

· Are these relations moderated by other factors such as, child factors (age, developmental level, gender), parent factors (language, literacy, educational values, responsiveness), family factors (socioeconomic status, family size), and social factors (cultural and ethnic identity, immigrant and generational status).?

Accomplishments:

The specific activities of the BELLS project are meeting those identified in the original grant proposal. Accomplishments include:

·A partnership has been formed with the Guadalupe Schools and with the community of Midvale. Enrollment of subjects from both locations has been occurring.

·Assessment batteries for children and families have been developed. Coding schemes have been identified for coding of language and for mother/child interaction.


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·A subcontract has been initiated with the University of South Dakota for coding of language transcripts.

·Training activities with the staff of the Guadalupe schools has been occurring. A collaborative process has been used to identify training topics and evaluation activities within the program.

·Project staff have met with the Family Advisory Board which consists of Hispanic families who have a young child.

·Assessors have been trained in the Salt Lake City area and assessment activities are ongoing, and project staff made two national presentations.


For more information on the project, view the presentation at: http://eiri.usu.edu/Bells/Bells_files/frame.htm.

7.4 Bridges in the Lives of Youth with Disabilities

Contact Person: Funding:

Linda Goetze OSERS $328,561

Description:

This study brings together a rich longitudinal extant base of student developmental scores, descriptions of school services and settings, family demographics with measures of social inclusion and post-school outcomes.

Accomplishments:

New data from youth and families about their community experiences and adaptation including the areas of work, recreation, leisure, and residential experiences in the community will be joined with the extant data to examine those

CPD staff member

relationships. The primary goal of the project is to describe the degree of community adjustment of youth with disabilities and their families and evaluate the influence of school inclusion, student and family characteristics on levels of community adjustment.

The first Bridges newsletter has been written and sent to participants. It describes initial findings of the study and features some recent experiences of one of youth in the study who lives in Iowa.

7.5 Immune Mechanism in Autism

Contact Person: Funding:

Dennis Odell NICHD $236,000

Ron Torres

Description:

Autism may result from faulty immune responses against brain tissue, which induce brain lesions. We are studying the possibility that the patient's immune system damages the brain and/or that the mother's immune system attacks the child's brain during pregnancy.

Accomplishments:

Data collection has been completed for this project. Subjects with autism and control subjects from Oregon and Utah have been evaluated, and HLA typing accomplished. This has added greatly to our ongoing database examining genes in the HLA region and autism. This work is still ongoing as part of other projects, and data is in the process of analysis. Three papers have been submitted so far this year, and are in various stages of publication. We continue to see evidence of a connection with specific genes in the HLA system, specifically C4B complement gene and HLA class II DR alleles. The meaning of these associations is not yet clear, but is being explored.

7.6 Integration and Development of Community-Based Family Supports for Utah (Family Alliances for Supports Today and Tomorrow)

Contact Person: Funding:

Richard Baer Administration on Developmental Disabilities $200,000

CPD Administration $8,972

CPD Bridging Funds $20,850

Outreach Division $30,944

Vice President for Research $22,343


Center for Persons with Disabilities

Description:

FASTT is a cooperative effort between the Center for Persons with Disabilities and the Utah Parent Center whose initial premises were:
· Many families with a member with a disability in Utah receive no services;

· Many families with a member with a disability in Utah who do receive services need an increased level of services to meet their needs;

· Federal and state funding for services are not likely increase dramatically in the foreseeable future; and

· If new families are to be served and the level of services is to be increased, communities need to find ways to use federal and state resources more efficiently, and develop local resources to supplement federal and state resources.

FASTT staff will be working in a number of Utah communities to better meet the needs of families. Initial efforts have begun in Ogden, a federally designated empowerment zone with a number of sizable minority communities. Project staff are conducting a needs assessment to determine what needs families have and how many families have them. Staff are also forming, training and supporting action teams composed of individuals and family members that wish to focus on developing local resources to meet identified needs. Materials and procedures developed and field tested in Ogden will be used to replicate the projects efforts in additional communities in future years.

Accomplishments:

An independent living action team obtained state funding to start an independent living center in Ogden, Utah. Facilities were obtained, a director hired, and a dynamic program begun. Two other action teams were formed. One team will address transition and one will address childcare issues. Both have set goals, written plans to meet their goals, and are in the process of implementing their plans. A state/local advisory council meeting was held in January. The councils advised that the project seek continuation funding, lay plans to sustain the project in Odgen, and expand to other areas of the state if funding allows. Administration for Developmental Disabilities (ADD) funding for the project ended early in 2001. The project has been continuing with funding from the Division, the CPD, and the Vice President for Research. A new grant was written to ADD and, hopefully, federal funding will again be available in September 2001.

7.7 MHC Associated Abnormalities in Autism

Contact Person: Funding:

Dennis Odell NICHD $138,923

Ron Torres

Description:

This grant is in conjunction with the University of Utah. It is funded from March 1, 1997 to February 28, 2002. The major thrust of these studies is to more thoroughly explore the relationship between the major human histocompatibility locus (MHC) and autism.

Accomplishments:

Data collection is ongoing. Many subjects with autism and their family members, as well as control families have been diagnosed by team members at the University of Utah. Determination of class I, II and III HLA alleles has been accomplished on most of those in the study. Also, IgA serum levels have been done, as well as other related studies. Data is being correlated with clinical information and MRI findings through studies by U of U investigators.

a picture of a child playing with adults

7.8 Monitoring and Measuring Community-Based Integrated Systems of Care

Contact Persons: Funding:

Richard Roberts MCHB $255,078

Diane Behl

Description:

The purpose of this project is to develop and implement a national strategy for monitoring and reporting progress toward Healthy People 2010's performance outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN):
·All CSHCN will receive coordinated ongoing comprehen- sive care within a medical home.


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·All families of CSHCN will have adequate private and/or public insurance to pay for the services they need.

·All children will be screened early and continuously for special health care needs.

·Services for CSHCN and their families will be organized in ways that families can use them easily.

·Families of CSHCN will partner in decision making at all levels, and will be satisfied with the services they receive.

·All youth with CSHCN will receive the services necessary to make appropriate transitions to adult health care, work, and independence.

The following states are participating in the project: Utah, Vermont, Ohio, Arizona, South Carolina, and Oregon.

Accomplishments:

A participatory action research model in which a consortium of stakeholders develops measures to help guide and report on the systems is under development. Stakeholders include families of children with special health care needs; community-based public and private providers including pediatricians; state, regional, and national level programs for children with special health care needs and their families, and professional and parent organizations involved in developing systems at community, state, and federal levels. A monitoring and measurement data management and reporting system will be developed. To date, measurement strategies have focused ondata warehousing and program improvement strategies. A recent product is a working document entitled Measuring Success for Healthy People 2010.

7.9 Touch and Failure to Thrive

Contact Person: Funding:

Vonda Jump University of Chicago $8,000

Description:

This pilot project at the University of Chicago Medical Center is funded by the University of Chicago. The focus is investigating the effects of infant massage on behavioral and neurochemical processes as well as the parent-child interaction for infants and young children diagnosed with failure-to-thrive. Twenty infants who are receiving services from the Grow Clinic at theUniversity of Chicago Medical Center will be randomly assigned to either the treatment (infant massage by caregiver) or control (rocking by caregiver) group. First morning urine samples will be collected and analyzed for cortisol, dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine before and after the intervention. Videotaped interactions between parents and children will be obtained before and after the intervention.

Accomplishments:

The project has recently moved from the Boston Medical Center to the University of Chicago Medical Center with Dr. Larry Gray, a developmental pediatrician.Methodological issues are currently being discussed, with revisions to ensure success working with high-risk families.

7.10 Utah Early Intervention Project - Follow-Up

Contact Person: Funding:

Mark Innocenti Utah State Office of Education $74,269

Description:

The Utah Early Intervention Project (UTEIP), was originally funded through the Utah Departments of Education and Health, as a three-year multi-method, longitudinal study of the effects of early intervention for high-risk and developmentally disabled young children birth through 5. Following completion of the original study, the Utah State Office of Education funded a follow-up study to continue to track children enrolled in the original study as they progressed through their academic career. This evaluation is participatory in nature in that evaluation and USOE staff will collaborate to determine specific questions to be addressed each year. Evaluation data will continue to be collected on the children and families involved in the areas of changes in classification, movement in and out of special education and other special services, service delivery patterns, Individual Education Plans, extended school year placements, and parent perceptions of services. This new information will be used to examine current issues in service delivery as well as in analyses with extant data to better examine later impacts of early intervention.

The following objectives have been identified for the 2001/02 year:

·Continue collection of longitudinal data as in past three years;

·Identify children, who exit from special education, compare those who exit from those who remain in special education and determine:

-Are differences on early scores or are they related to program characteristics while in early intervention or after exiting early intervention?


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-Children will be matched in these groups based on initial developmental characteristics and differences in placement trajectories will be examined while determining the impact of factors such as health status, family context, classification, and program characteristics.

-Are differences based on inclusion settings?

·Evaluate the effects of inclusion on classification and the interaction of child, family, and program characteristics with inclusion;

·Examine if current placement tells us anything about past services.;

·Examine changes in classification status based on program, inclusion, parent, or child characteristics;

·Obtain current IEPs and examine for types of changes from early intervention IEP goals;

·Obtain statewide administered third grade standardized test results and examine impacts of child, parent, program, inclusion, and longitudinal characteristics on these outcomes;

·Disseminate quarterly newsletter to relevant school district staff, parents, and others.

Accomplishments:

The following activities were accomplished during the 2000/2001 year. Contact has been maintained with approximately 234 families of the original 300 in the study. This is an excellent attrition rate for a longitudinal study. We do have information on approximately 20 parents who have moved out of state, but these parents are no longer contacted. Parents of 234 children enrolled in the study were contacted by phone and a questionnaire completed. Issues addressed in the questionnaire include current placement and services, movement in and out of special education, satisfaction with services, additional services received, and information on special types of settings (home schooling, specialized centers, etc.). Of these parents, 137 report their child to be receiving IEP based services. Teachers of children identified by their parents as being in special education were contacted for placement and service information and for basic information on child classroom functioning.

Focus groups on preschool teachers and staff perceptions of IEPs were conducted. Information on IEPs was collected during four focus groups held at the Statewide Preschool Conference. All people involved in the focus groups were teachers or other classroom service providers. Preliminary findings are in draft form.

For general information, last year (1999/2000) 219 parents were contacted and 140 children were reported as receiving special education services. Last year, 20 percent of the children were in kindergarten, 55 percent in first grade, 22 percent in second grade. One was in third grade and the remainder were in preschool. Of those in special education, 60 percent were classified developmentally delayed, 17 percent multiple disabilities, 13 percent speech and language impaired, and the rest fell into other categories.

7.11 Utah Frontiers Project: A System of Care for Children and Youth with Serious Emotional Disturbances (SED) in Frontier Areas

Contact Person: Funding:

Glenna Boyce Child, Adolescent and Family Branch of the Center for Mental Health Services USDHHS $190,349

Description:

The Utah State Division of Mental Health, with regional mental health divisions, is conducting a nationally funded project, the Utah Frontiers Project, to improve community-based mental health services for children with SED and their families in rural, frontier areas of the state. Kane, Garfield and Beaver counties were the first project area (Cohort 1) in the state; Carbon, Emery, and Grand counties (Cohort 2) are also participating. This five year project started in October 1, 1998; it is one of approximately 43 projects across the nation funded by Child, Adolescent and Family Branch of the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS). A national evaluation of the projects has been mandated by Congress to learn how the projects are developed and how they help children and families. Glenna C. Boyce and James F. Akers at the Early Intervention Research Institute at Utah State University are conducting the Utah Frontiers evaluation in conjunction with Sherilin Rowley fromLiaisons (LINCS). The goals of the study are to keep children at home, in school and out of trouble in the community. The Utah evaluation involves four components: (1) a cross-sectional descriptive study; (2) child and family outcome study; (3) system-level assessment; and (4) services and cost study.

Accomplishments:

The activities performed in year 2 have continued in year 3.The activities are briefly summarized in the following:

(1) Efforts have continued to collect accurate, valid data. For, example the training, supervision, and mentoring of the


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In-Home Evaluators (interviewers/assessors) has continued with several training sessions. Also, in Cohort 1 (Kane, Garfield, and Beaver counties) the interview techniques of the In-Home Evaluators in Cohort 1 were observed by USU staff. Feedback was given to the evaluators. In Cohort 2 the initial training of the In-Home Evaluators was completed in preparation for the enlistment of subjects into the study.

(2) Assessments were completed at six month intervals for subjects in Cohort 1. Assessments in Cohort 2 will begin in 2001-2002.

(3) Introductory meetings were held in the communities in Cohort 2 (Price, Castle Dale, Green River and Moab) with the Local Interagency Councils (LICs) and withFour Corners Mental Health staff.

(4) Changes were made in the computer assisted interview format to accommodate the changes made by MACRO International.

(5) The process of providing feedback information to the clinicians from the questionnaires completed by the parent in the assessment interviews was refined. Clinicians were consulted about the content and format of the reports.

(6) Presentations were made to state groups, as well as the CMHS Grantee Meetings.

7.12 Promoting Resilient Outcomes

Contact Person: Funding:

Mark Innocenti OERI/USDOE $89,914

CPD staff member

Description:

The primary purpose of PRO is to design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of a home visiting model based on the concept of resiliency and related child development theories. The project focuses on developing skills in caregivers that will allow them to enter into more nurturing relationships with their children such that they can develop positive behaviors and by so doing prevent later behavior problems. This project is strengths-based, rather than deficit-based, and focuses on facilitating positive, future academic and behavioral development. The target group is primarily enrolled in Utah FACT P-5 programs. These are state funded, collaborative programs for children environmentally at-risk, ages prenatal to 5, and their families. Some programs are being enhanced by the intervention introduced by this study. Specifically, home visitors and FACT team members are trained in the Mutual Competence model of providing preventative intervention. The primary outcome desired is a secure attachment and increased positive interactions between each caregiver and child.

Accomplishments:

This project has completed the training phase of the project. Project staff continue to work with the Healthy Steps program in Davis County and the Guadalupe Schools Home Base program ( Salt Lake City) on a follow-up basis. Final data collection activities are occurring. Project outcomes are focused on maternal attachment, parent-child interaction, ecocultural adaptation, and cognitive development. Contextual data on families and treatment verification data are also being collected. The project is using a participatory research model that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative research methods. The final year of the project is focused on developing a dissemination package for the Mutual Competence Model and on analysis of obtained data.

8.0 Technical Assistance

8.1 Finding Utah's Most-In-Need Children: Process Improvement for Severely Disabled and Culturally Diverse Populations

Contact Persons: Funding:

Daniel Judd Community and University Research Initiative $38,783

Mark Innocenti

Description:

The purpose of this project is improve the Child Find process in Part C early intervention programs in Utah. Stakeholder teams in rural communities are working with project staff to improve the Child Find process for locating children with


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severe disabilities and those with disabilities living in Spanish-speaking families. These teams include stakeholders from all aspects of the Child Find process, including service providers, medical professionals, community leaders, parents with early intervention experience, and other members of the community.

Accomplishments:

We have completed the second year and we are moving beyond local processes to systems that serve the two target groups, including children ages zero to three living in Emery, Grand, Wasatch, and Summit Counties (a) with severe disabilities, and (b) those living in Spanish-speaking families. Following are accomplishments realized within the communities:

·Medical care is improving. Improvement of the child find process depends on community empowerment to build an infrastructure of services. Services basic to the health of children and mothers are housing, medical care, and child care. Improving access to medical care was the first priority of community teams. Specific examples of improvements made by the Project from three of the target communities are found in the corresponding section of the Mid-Year Report.

·Childcare is improving. Child care is part of the social infrastructure that supports child find. Nationwide, we see that low-income families rely heavily on child care services, especially parents of children with special needs. This is also true in two of the communities in which we are working, Green River and Park City. Project staff are actively involved in child care solutions for all communities and are working on several fronts: Financial resources are being infused into the certification process. The Project is offering $100 scholarships to Hispanic women willing to become certified to establish child care in their home. Green River has a budget of $22,000 for two individuals, one of which will be Hispanic, to perform community development around issues of early childhood care and education.

·Capacity is growing in the target communities. Improving the system for finding children with special needs is the goal of this project. The focus of our project has been on Hispanic families because they are most likely to be left out of service systems when a community is building its capacity. Hispanic communities face limitations in their ability to build capacity. We have worked to reduce limitations in acceptance, leadership, and access to information. Specific examples from three of the target communities are found in the corresponding section of the Mid-Year Report. Funding is arriving for community development among rural Hispanics. This focus on improving services for growing Hispanic communities in Utah has attracted additional funding. Funding totaling $7,000 has been obtained through a private foundation to establish emergency medical funds in three Hispanic communities and to assist the City of Green River develop child care resources. In December, graduate students and project staff assisted the city of Green River to write a grant and obtain a $22,000 grant through a Head Start mini-grant initiative.

·Community relationships are building system improvements. Trust comes with continuity. We attend team meetings at least monthly to work on the needs that the team has identified and at the same time build a broader network of

CPD staff member

relationships in the community. Relationships between health care providers and Hispanic women were highlighted early on in the process with mixed success: In Green River the Medical Center's Physician's Assistant took a personal interest and made a number changes to accommodate Hispanic families. In Castle Dale, the Emery Medical Center is making changes but the pace is slower and the results less consistent. In the Park City area, we are partnered with the Peoples' Health Center, who is managing a Hispanic emergency fund, and the USU extension services who are conducting classes in Spanish.

8.2 Development and Dissemination of Staff Development Materials on Autism

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister Utah State Office of Education $19,906

Description:

This project provides technical assistance to teachers and administrators in Utah public schools on effective instructional programs for children with autism.


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Accomplishments:

Workshop training was completed and videotape training models are under development. This project is now completed.

8.3 Development of Transition Satisfaction Survey

Contact Person: Funding:
Alan Hofmeister USOE $25,000

Description:

Study focusing on IEP meetings in public schools and the team members attending those meetings. Survey instruments and group/individual interview formats will be developed and administered. The data collected will be processed and reported. A pre-IEP planning meeting intervention will be developed and tested. The intervention will focus on preparing team members to positively impact IEP planning meeting satisfaction.

Accomplishments:

Data has been analyzed and provided to the Utah State Office of Education. This project has been completed.

8.4 LRBI Quality Implementation Training Tapes

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister USOE $128,814

Description:

This project produced a set of intervention videotapes that paralleled the hierarchy of interventions outlined in the LRBI document, and provided inservice training to special education personnel, pupil services staff, related service providers, and administrators utilizing the videotapes, quality implementation checklists, and the LRBI document.

Accomplishments:

Statewide workshops were conducted, emphasizing functional analysis. This project is now completed.

8.5 Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC) Region 5

Contact Person: Funding:

John Copenhaver USDOE/OSEP $1,178,333

Description:
The MPRRC provides technical assistance to State education agencies in developing quality programs and services for children with disabilities. The MPRRC identifies and analyzes persisting problems that interfere with the provision of special education services. It links state education agencies experiencing similar problems, assists them in developing solutions and supports them in their efforts to adopt new technologies and practices. The MPRRC serves Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Arizona, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Accomplishments:

The following are some of the accomplishments of the Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center for the year 2000-2001. 1. Assisted the Bureau of Indian Affairs in organizing and conducting their first special education law institute. Over 500 educators and parents attended the conference. 2. Assisted Utah in organizing and implementing their annual special education law institute; over 600 parents and educators participated. 3. Worked with OSEP and the other RRCs in conducting two self-assessment institutes for 47 SEA/LAs. The institutes were held in Salt Lake City and Chicago. 4. Assisted South Dakota in developing and implementing a new results based monitoring process. 5. Conducted Section 504 trainings at two parent alliance conferences. 6. Assisted Wyoming in facilitating their first public forum meetings. 7. Facilitated and presented at the regional NECTAS/NASDSE Section 619 meeting. 8. Participated in the OSEP/RRC/NECTAS improvement planning meeting. 9. Conducted a self-assessment and participated in a two day OSEP evaluation of the MPRRC. 10. Participated in the WRRC and GLARRC on-site OSEP evaluation. 11. Helped facilitate the November 29­30 OSEP National Monitoring Summit. 12. Facilitated the first National Charter School Conference. 13. Coordinated the third annual alternate assessment forum where 130+ individuals attended. 14. Began the replication and implementation of transition outcome projects in North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Utah, and New Mexico this quarter. 15. Expanded the Montana Transition Outcome Project from two pilot districts to 55 additional districts this fall. 16. Gave a teleconference presentation on the Transition Outcome Projects for NASDSE. 17. Hosted a face-to-face meeting of transition specialists for the MPRRC region. 18. Implemented a comprehensive investigation to determine the effective


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ness of program and services for a select group of Utah's students with sensory impairments. 19. Developed a neighboring states teleconference program with states in the northern part of the MPRRC region to examine cross state solutions to problems with teacher shortages, credentialing, and reciprocity. The neighboring states of Idaho and Minnesota are invited as well as their corresponding RRCs­WRRC and GLARRC. 20. Presented at New Mexico's first Inaugural Conference on School Dropouts which looked at other states dropout prevention programs. 21. Assisted Montana's Professional Consortium in developing a statewide paraprofessional training program and explaining their newly developed paraprofessional guide to participants at Montana's Council for Exceptional Children's Conference. 22. Developed and conducted a comprehensive investigation of Utah's laws, regulations, services, and financial relationships between and among agencies that effect the programs for Utah's students with sensory impairments. 23. MPRRC assisted the Bureau of Indian Affairs in developing and implementing a new monitoring process that focuses on positive results for children with disabilities. 24. MPRRC implemented a region wide teleconference work group to address issues relating to behavior management and discipline. 25.

CPD staff member

MPRRC conducted a major training for Head Start providers in a six-state area regarding their roles and responsibilities under Section 504/ADA. 26. MPRRC has created an electronic employment bulletin board that involves eight states and assists them in recruiting general and special education staff. 27. MPRRC assisted Kansas in their self-assessment process in preparation for the OSEP monitoring. 28. MPRRC staff assisted the New Mexico Parent Training Center with the implementation of their annual conference. 29. MPRRC staff completed the para-educator training program and completed training for approximately 100 people in North and South Dakota for the BIA. 30. MPRRC completed the North Dakota Alternate Assessment and helped develop the scoring and Rubrics. All children in North Dakota taking the Alternate Assessment have scores to report, meeting the requirements of IDEA 97. 31. MPRRC involved all MPRRC states in training linking agents for the EMSTAC program. 32. MPRRC facilitated the Wyoming Steering Committee for Self-Assessment and helped them submit the assessment to OSEP. 33. MPRRC assisted Wyoming in preparing their SIG grant application and submitting it to OSEP in February. 34. MPRRC conducted focus sessions to identify issues related to entry and exit process for related services in New Mexico. Results were analyzed and used to develop a final report. 35. MPRRC assisted New Mexico in developing a statewide IEP form that meets the new IDEA requirements. 36. MPRRC developed and facilitated a session for Special Education Advisory Council members for the OSEP Leadership Conference. 37. MPRRC began the replication and implementation of transition outcome projects in South Dakota and with all secondary BIA schools in New Mexico. 38. MPRRC initiated discussions with will have draft TAAs developed on implementing the Transition Outcome project in Arizona and Colorado for the 2001/2002 school year. This means that this project and effort will be in place in every state in the MPRRC region, including the entire BIA system. 39. MPRRC held teleconferences with transition personnel across the region. 40. MPRRC was invited to present for the OSEP/CEC Partnership Annual Cadre Meeting in Arlington, Virginia. 41. MPRRC was invited to present at the National CEC meeting in Kansas City. This was a co-presentation with MPRRC, Montana, and Wyoming. 42. MPRRC helped innovate and took part in the first Stakeholders Institute that truly accomplished joint problem-solving among diverse groups. 43. MPRRC held a training of complaint investigators, including recently contracted investigators, occurred immediately following the resolution, through consent decree, of a class action law suit against the SEA regarding the complaint process in Arizona. 44. MPRRC brought together 59 stakeholders (parents, parent training centers, superintendents, special ed directors, principals, teachers, SEA staff, and others), along with the direct intended beneficiaries (due process hearing officers and mediators) to participate in due process hearing and mediation training, which included a review of substantive and procedural requirements of IDEA and its implementing regulations, OSEP memorandum and interpretations, and case law. Given the small number of hearings and meditations each year in this state, the information was valuable to all of the stakeholders who have had little or no direct experience with meditations or special education hearings. 45. There has been an increase in participation in the Legal Collaboration Network. The calls consistently involve dissemination of information contained in regulations, comment and analysis to the regulations, or OSEP memoranda. The participants continue to express that the network is valuable.

8.6 Opening Doors into Rural Communities

Contact Persons: Funding:

Richard Roberts MCHB $249,993
Adrienne Akers


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Description:

Opening Doors into Rural Communities is providing technical assistance and evaluating the efforts of four rural communities as they attempt to develop more comprehensive, coordinated early intervention systems.

Accomplishments:

ODRC is currently providing assistance to four communities including Pocatello, Idaho; Lewiston, Idaho; Augusta, Maine; and Jefferson County, Missouri. The communities will be targeting the following serviced integration strategies as recommended by the Federal Interagency Coordinating Council: (a) common application and eligibility procedures; (b) the use of blended or flexible funding; (c) integrated data and information systems; and (d) coordination of early intervention with the medical home. Project efforts have focused on providing technical assistance to support the community efforts and on measuring the anticipated changes in family satisfaction with services as well as changes in the service system infrastructure.

8.7 Safe & Drug Free Schools and Communities Evaluation

Contact Person: Funding:

Margaret Lubke Utah State Office of Education $12,676

Description:

This contract was awarded to collect incidence data. Schools districts within Utah will be grouped into ten geographic regions with between three and five districts in each group. Staff use the responsive/cluster evaluation model to help districts strengthen their programs in terms of operationalizing the SDFSCA Principals of Effectiveness. The regional on-site visits involve stakeholders from the Utah State Office of Education, the state SDFSCA Advisory board, school districts, SDFSCA Prevention Specialists from county Mental Health organizations, and other volunteers from outside the region who come together to share common goals, questions, and experiences.

Accomplishments:

In addition to conducting the onsite visits, for the past five years we have been responsible for designing the data collection forms and aggregating state-wide incident information for the SDFSCA program. This has provided a performance measure that indicates the success of the overall program. In designing the data collection forms, we have conducted focus groups with local district personnel and related stakeholders around the state to develop a common understanding of the terms and definitions included on the incident reporting form.

8.8 Statewide Personnel Development for the Effective Involvement of Paraprofessionals in

Special Education

Contact Person: Funding:

Alan Hofmeister USOE $154,223

Description:

This project developed, validated, and implemented a statewide training program for special education administrators. It addressed competencies needed to develop district-wide policies for paraprofessionals in special education, and developed, validated, and implemented a statewide training program for special education teachers and related services personnel who have direct supervision responsibilities for paraprofessionals.

Accomplishments:

More than 900 professional and paraprofessional staff have been involved in this project, and staff provided numerous workshops. Courses, workshops, and a national conference have been planned and implemented. The annual state paraeducator's conference at Snowbird was supported. This project is now completed.

8.9 Web Accessibility in Mind (WebAIM)

Contact Person: Funding:
Cyndi Rowland LAAP $262,112

Description:

Web Accessibility In Mind (WebAIM) is administered through a grant provided by the Learning Anywhere Anytime Program Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education. The goal of WebAIM is to improve the national picture of accessibility to web-based educational opportunities for individuals with disabilities. WebAIM utilizes the strength of national partnerships to accomplish the goal of the project. Those partners are:


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CPD staff member

·Teaching Learning through Technology Affiliate of the American Association of Higher Education;

·George Mason University; and

·BlackBoard Inc.

Given the enormous problems in web site accessibility, WebAIM will help in the following ways:

·Disseminate materials that raise awareness and assist postsecondary institutions to identify and solve web accessibility problems.

·Create a systematic model for training and technical assistance to support the development of accessible web sites.

·Refine a web authoring tool (BlackBoard) to support web accessibility at post-secondary institutions.
·Develop a model for institutional coordination and reform to support web accessibility.

Accomplishments:

In the second year of the project WebAIM partners disseminated print-based information on the problem of inaccessible Web sites to a potential

readership of 5.5 million readers. Over 20,000 unique visitors came to the WebAim.org Web site for information on accessible design. WebAIM partners delivered face-to-face dissemination (e.g., national conferences and workshops) to over 10,000 individuals and intensive training to over 500 Web developers across 18 institutions of higher education. Well over 10,000 individuals completed electronic training from the Web site (e.g., tutorials, online courses). BlackBoard completed their first release of a course management tool that is accessible to the new 508 federal regulations for accessibility.

8.10 Hawaii Monitoring Contract

Contact Person: Funding:

Margaret Lubke State of Hawaii, DOE $18,500

Description:
Technically, Hawaii only has one school district with seven subdistricts located on five islands, with onsite visits scheduled on a rotating, three-year cycle. The schools in the Hawaii system include some small rural schools located in places and some with huge numbers of students such as Honolulu on the island of Oahu. This contract is a multi-method evaluation of services for students with disabilities who attend island public schools and includes the islands of Oahu, Maui, Hawaii, Kawaii and Molokai. The project uses a discrepancy evaluation model to document and ensure compliance with specific Federal and State regulations. As part of the discrepancy evaluations, staff interview and survey stakeholders, including parents, teachers, school principals, and agency administrators, identify validated and promising practices implemented by each school and agency.

Accomplishments:

The results of student record reviews were provided to school staff in an effort to confirm findings and ensure the accuracy of the data collected before reports were finalized. Evaluation staff in combination with agency administrators established recommendations for program improvement as well as corrective actions to address procedural and timeline errors. The project is now completed.


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Compiled and Edited: Kelleen Smith

Cover Design: Joel Taylor

Cover Photography: USU Photo Services
Photography: Kelleen Smith



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